The New York Times burnished its reputation for hostility toward religion with a crass tweet that denigrated the American family of Mormons, massacred by a drug cartel in Mexico, as they were traveling in an SUV caravan on Monday. Six children and three women were killed. The Times tweeted the story out on Tuesday afternoon with negative connotations of the women and children victims: 



Atheist Jim Brockmire (Hank Azaria) on IFC’s Brockmire might not make much headway in finding God, but he does find plenty of ways to offend in April 17’s episode, “The Yips.”



A drama based on the supernatural world of witches and warlocks aimed at teens and young adults is probably not the best place to look for clean, wholesome fun, especially if the venue is Netflix. There are three specific topics brought into Part Two of Chilling Adventures of Sabrina that will cause concern for conservative parents.



Comedian David Cross insists that his stand-up routine is not political or anti-Donald Trump in any way. But during his most recent show for a bunch of Trump supporters in Utah, local news reported that he joked about beating the president into a “bloody pulp and then urinating and defecating on him.”



HBO proudly aired their star Bill Maher doing stand-up in Tulsa, Oklahoma on Saturday night, with a routine centering on mocking President Trump. "Doesn’t everything about this man scream microdick? The bragging, and the buildings with my name on it! And the debates. He was talking about his dick at the debates! That guy is president." Maher went on to suggest Trump "never once brought a woman to orgasm."



If you’ve ever watched The Big Bang Theory or its new spin-off Young Sheldon, you already know that both shows love to remind viewers how much main character Sheldon doesn’t believe in God and likes to bash Christianity. But just in case you missed the 5,924,835 references that came before, Thursday night’s episode of Young Sheldon, “Demons, Sunday School, and Prime Numbers,” made sure to remind everyone once again.



More proof that the New York Times’ political bias extends into death. The latest hostile treatment of a figure who ran afoul of the liberal line on social issues appeared Thursday, in an obituary of the president of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (the Mormon church). Thomas Monson received less sympathetic treatment than did ruthless longtime Communist dictator, Fidel Castro.



Strange New Respect? New York Times religion reporter Laurie Goodstein celebrated the Mormon faith of fierce Trump critic Sen. Jeff Flake in Thursday’s paper. The online headline was the goopiest: “Flake’s Speech Bore Marks of Mormon Faith, Not Just Politics.” The text box was pretty gushy too: “In standing up to President Trump, standing ‘for what you believe in.’” Suddenly, the NYT approves of Mormonism! That’s quite a change from what the paper thought in 2012, when Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney put that religion in the spotlight.



Cyd Zeigler hit the NCAA from the left in a Tuesday post on Outsports for not going far enough in their move to take NCAA playoff games in several sports out of North Carolina over its "anti-LGBT 'HB2' law." Zeigler contended that "if the NCAA is serious, it is only a matter of time before BYU [Brigham Young University] gets kicked out of the association...[a]nd every other school with an anti-LGBT policy." The writer singled out several religious schools for having "policies...far more sinister and discriminatory than North Carolina."



It’s no secret that ABC pushes the gay agenda. But if you doubt it, wait until its newest miniseries comes out (pun intended).

Authored by openly gay screenwriter Dustin Lance Black, When We Rise will detail the history of the gay rights movement from the 1969 Stonewall Riots to the present day. It follows the stories of three people who are also members of the women’s rights movement, the peace movement and the black rights movement. “It's When We Rise, not When Gay People Rise,” Black told Adweek. “It's about how everyone benefits when we lift up any one group in this country.” If you think it will be a neutral examination of one of the biggest rights movement of our time, think again. 



The New York Times wrote a staff editorial about the Mormon Church and their refusal to baptize the children of same-sex couples. The headline was “Stung by Edict on Gays, Mormons Leave Church."

In an earlier story, the Times found that nearly 1,500 people resigned during a “mass resignation” on November 14. There are nearly 15 million members in the Mormon Church, so if 1,500 resignations constitute a “massive drove,” they may want to rethink their math – that’s only about 0.0001 percent of the church which “resigned," many of them what you would call inactive or fallen members of the church.



On Thursday's The Nightly Show on Comedy Central, host Larry Wilmore skewered President Barack Obama in the aftermath of Russia undermining the President's Syria policy by bombing the Syrian rebels Obama has been supporting.

The Comedy Central host reminded viewers that Obama had mocked Mitt Romney in 2012 when the GOP presidential candidate warned that Russia would be one of America's greatest foreign policy problems, as Wilmore referred to Obama's cocky dismissal of Romney as "near-sighted snobbery," and played a clip of the exchange with Romney.