Rebecca Downs

Contributing Writer


Latest from Rebecca Downs

Last year, Hulu’s Shrill shocked voters with its main character, Annie (Aidy Bryant), abusing emergency contraception and ultimately getting an abortion--on screen. The abortion was then normalized in the worst way, with Annie declaring she felt “really, really good” and “very fucking powerful” afterwards. Then again, when the show is made by abortion activists, including the woman behind “shout your abortion,” it’s sadly not so surprising.



Sheriff Bill Hollister (Stephen Dorff) is having a busy day on the February 13 episode of Deputy. It's a day made all the more complicated by getting into a car accident with Deputy Brianna Bishop (Bex Taylor-Klaus). Being in the hospital sets Bishop off, which leads to the show's reveal that the character, like Taylor-Klause, is non-binary. What's worse is when she talks to the Sheriff's wife, Dr. Paula Reyes (Yara Martinez), the doctor claims that "there are more than two sexes."



Hippie parents Alicia (Tika Sumpter) and Paul Johnson (Mark-Paul Gosselaar) learn to get outside of their comfort zones in the February 11 Valentine's Day episode of ABC's Mixish. In the show, which takes place in the 1980s, Alicia has to grow comfortable with young Rainbow (Arica Himmel) going on a date with Bryce.



The first half hour of the 92nd Academy Awards started off very woke on Sunday night on ABC, from the opening musical number being sung by a self-declared "queer, black artist" to Steve Martin and Chris Rock going on a riff about all the white nominees.



While television networks largely celebrate abortion, it’s worth noting that a celebration of life is taking place, with the annual March for Life on January 24. Whether networks will finally give these peaceful pro-lifers their due in media coverage, after for years neglecting them, remains to be seen. Meanwhile, liberal television networks, from news shows, to actress spokespersons, to television dramas, continue to promote abortion to the public.



If you wondered what kind of dad that liberal Ryan (Jordan Masterson) was going to be to his new daughter on Last Man Standing, January 23’s episode “Bedtime Story” clued us in.



Last week, Paramount’s latest television series, 68 Whiskey, introduced viewers to the plight of Sergeant Rosa Alvarez (Cristina Rodlo) whose DACA status is being revoked. Thus, she’s being dismissed from the Army. January 22's episode, "Finger Lickin' Good" continues the storyline, with a lot of insults for our "racist goddamn country."



It seemed only natural that January 19's 26th annual Screen Actors Guild Awards on TNT and TBS would get political. Why is that? Well, known Trump-basher Robert De Niro was being honored with a life achievement award.



The series premiere of Paramount’s 68 Whiskey on January 15, “Buckley’s Goat,” introduces viewers to the boozed up, foul-mouthed (they drop uncensored f-bombs 25 times in 60 minutes), overly sexed (the very first scene involves soldiers getting it on) Army medics stationed in Afghanistan.



By the end of the third episode of USA’s Dare Me, it’s perfectly clear that there may not be any good guys in this dark high school cheerleading drama. All the teens are either abusing each other, abusing alcohol, covering up for a coach’s affair, or getting older men to perform sex acts on them.



Fox’s new series, Deputy, told the story of Sergeant Bill Hollister (Stephen Dorff), the great, great, great, great grandson of one of the first Los Angeles deputies killed on the job. Hollister became sheriff after the newly elected sheriff suffered a heart attack and died.



Netflix’s Soundtrack is a charming musical telling the story of the interracial relationship between musician Sam (Paul James) and artist Eleanor "Nellie" (Callie Hernandez), partly through flashbacks. The show’s charm, however, is ruined by the character’s selfishness centered around an abortion.



It was bound to happen: a show about the LGBT community and an episode about bathrooms. In the December 29 episode of Work in Progress, “161, 153, 137, 122, 106, 104, 102 (We're Still Counting Almonds),” main character Abby (Abby McEnany), who is a lesbian, laments how she’s confused for a man when she uses the bathroom.



Showtime’s December 8 premiere of Work In Progress, titled “180 Almonds,” is the latest dark comedy from Abby McEnany, who plays Abby, a self-described “fat... queer dyke who has done shit in her life." How dark of a comedy is it? The opening quickly segues from Abby talking on the phone to someone with a "wazzup" greeting to telling her therapist she plans to kill herself in 180 days; a therapist who ends up dying, mid-session in her chair.



In Netflix’s Another Life, released July 25, just about everything that can go wrong on the mission does. Including an unintended pregnancy, which the show uses as a chance to push abortion, through euphemisms, of course, in its season finale. Sometime in the future, an alien artifact has landed on Earth. A crew, led by Niko Brekinridge (Katee Sackhoff) has been sent aboard the Salvare to investigate why the aliens have come.



As BBC's Years and Years, which has aired in the United States on HBO, came to a close with Episode 6 airing July 29, the writers couldn't help but throw in some more comparisons between evil Prime Minister Vivienne Rook (Emma Thompson) and President Donald Trump.



On BBC’s Episode 4 of Years and Years, which aired July 15 in the United States on HBO, it’s now 2027. The world continues to be in chaos, with financial and governing problems plaguing European nations. The United States is hit, too, as Roe v. Wade has finally been overturned, all these years later.



Kevin Bacon’s character Jackie Rohr may be the star FBI agent of Showtime’s early 90s-era Boston drama City on a Hill, but he’s far from likable. In July 14’s episode, “From Injustice Came the Way to Describe Justice,” he’s once again seen casually having sex with his mistress, while his wife and mother-in-law are left home wondering where he is.



On the second episode of BBC’s Years and Years, which aired in the United States on HBO July 1, the woes of the Lyons family have become more catastrophic. A year has passed since the nuking of the Chinese island of Hong Sha Do in the final days of the Trump presidency, which has brought about sanctions and trade wars.



BBC One’s limited series Years and Years tells the story of the Lyons family living in the United Kingdom between 2019 and 2034. Episode 1, which premiered in the United States on HBO on June 24, quickly shows us that President Trump will be reelected in 2020, but ends with the vision of Trump having just fired nuclear missiles at China.