Rebecca Downs

Contributing Writer


Latest from Rebecca Downs

In Netflix’s Another Life, released July 25, just about everything that can go wrong on the mission does. Including an unintended pregnancy, which the show uses as a chance to push abortion, through euphemisms, of course, in its season finale. Sometime in the future, an alien artifact has landed on Earth. A crew, led by Niko Brekinridge (Katee Sackhoff) has been sent aboard the Salvare to investigate why the aliens have come.



As BBC's Years and Years, which has aired in the United States on HBO, came to a close with Episode 6 airing July 29, the writers couldn't help but throw in some more comparisons between evil Prime Minister Vivienne Rook (Emma Thompson) and President Donald Trump.



On BBC’s Episode 4 of Years and Years, which aired July 15 in the United States on HBO, it’s now 2027. The world continues to be in chaos, with financial and governing problems plaguing European nations. The United States is hit, too, as Roe v. Wade has finally been overturned, all these years later.



Kevin Bacon’s character Jackie Rohr may be the star FBI agent of Showtime’s early 90s-era Boston drama City on a Hill, but he’s far from likable. In July 14’s episode, “From Injustice Came the Way to Describe Justice,” he’s once again seen casually having sex with his mistress, while his wife and mother-in-law are left home wondering where he is.



On the second episode of BBC’s Years and Years, which aired in the United States on HBO July 1, the woes of the Lyons family have become more catastrophic. A year has passed since the nuking of the Chinese island of Hong Sha Do in the final days of the Trump presidency, which has brought about sanctions and trade wars.



BBC One’s limited series Years and Years tells the story of the Lyons family living in the United Kingdom between 2019 and 2034. Episode 1, which premiered in the United States on HBO on June 24, quickly shows us that President Trump will be reelected in 2020, but ends with the vision of Trump having just fired nuclear missiles at China.



With a bloody body count of 55, Nicolas Winding Refn's latest project, Too Old to Die Young, which premiered June 14 on Amazon Prime, takes violence and death to another level. The 10 episodes pack murder, rape pornography, sex trafficking, torture, and incest into what Refn refers to as “a 13-hour movie.”



Detective Armando Cruz (Armando Riesco) is known by fellow Detective Alice Toussaint (Crystal Ann Dickinson) as having a “bleeding heart for black men,” and in May 26’s episode of Showtime's The Chi, “Blind Eye,” viewers gain a glimpse as to why.



The passage of abortion laws in Georgia and Alabama have caused a flurry of media reactions, including many misleading ones. At least 16 articles claimed or suggested women would be jailed for having abortions, even though the laws’ text is available for all to read, and specifies women will not face prosecution.



In the May 16 finale of For the People, "A Choice Between Two Things," the public defenders’ office and prosecutors take on voter intimidation perpetrated by “a pro-business advocacy group.” The episode opens on Election Day, with defense attorney Jay Simmons (Wesam Keesh) waiting in line to vote with his parents, naturalized citizens from Syria.



If you thought it was sick how abortion advocates celebrated Valentine’s Day, wait until you see how they marked Mother’s Day.



Fox’s Star season finale aired May 8, and along with it came the long-awaited American Sound Awards (ASA) ceremony, where the girl band, Take 3, is up for Best Pop Album. To start the awards show is a sacrilegious music performance, from the singer everyone loves to hate, Lil Dini (Marcos Palacios), and up-and-coming rapper Rashad (Major).



With just one episode left before the season finale, Fox’s Proven Innocent finally delves into immigration policy in its May 3 episode, “In Defense of Madeline Scott-Part 1.” It's also not the first episode this week to tackle the issue, with Grey's Anatomy gracing viewers with stories of families separated and "caged like animals."



Another Thursday night means more Chuck Lorre shows, and the likelihood that Lorre is going to mock President Trump in a very bizarre way. Following The Big Bang Theory’s May 2 episode, “The Plagiarism Schism,” shows viewers obstetrical forceps. Lorre hints that Trump may have been injured by such forceps when being born, and that he may even have syphilis.



While protesting an Alabama bill on abortion, State Rep. John Rogers made some pretty outlandish comments: “Some kids are unwanted, so you kill them now or you kill them later. You bring them in the world unwanted, unloved, you send them to the electric chair. So, you kill them now or you kill them later.” But, since he’s a Democrat, he’s been given a free pass by the media.



Over the weekend, President Trump held a rally in Wisconsin, where he criticized Democratic Governor Tony Evers for saying he’d veto a bill requiring doctors provide medical care to babies born alive from an abortion. The media predictably pounced.



On April 22, Democratic Kansas Governor Laura Kelly vetoed SB 67, a bill which would have merely informed women about the possibility of abortion pill reversal. But it’s not just the Kansas governor, some liberal media outlets are complicit in denying women the full-range of information when it comes to the abortion pill.



In the Star universe, Atlanta may be a sanctuary city now, but that doesn’t stop Gravity Records from continuing to turn Simone (Brittany O’Grady) into “a political figure on the national stage” in April 24’s episode “Square One.”



Netflix’s No Good Nick tells the story of Nick (Siena Agudong) who catfishes an unsuspecting family, the Thompsons, into thinking she’s family. Add in the Thompsons' daughter, the socially conscious Molly (Lauren Lindsey Donzis), and it gets a whole lot weirder.



With a redacted Mueller report being released today, it's not merely the talking heads who are reacting in a bizarre fashion, it's also Hollywood, too.