Tim Graham

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Executive Editor


Tim Graham is Executive Editor of NewsBusters and is the Media Research Center’s Director of Media Analysis. His career at the MRC began in February 1989 as associate editor of MediaWatch, the monthly newsletter of the MRC before the Internet era.

Graham is co-author with MRC president Brent Bozell of the books Collusion: How the Media Stole the 2012 Election and How To Prevent It From Happening Again in 2016 (2013) and Whitewash: What The Media Won’t Tell You About Hillary Clinton, But Conservatives Will (2007). He is also the author of the book Pattern of Deception: The Media's Role in the Clinton Presidency (1996).

Graham is a regular talk-radio and television spokesman for the MRC and has made television appearances on MSNBC, CNBC, CNN, Fox News, and the Fox Business Channel. His articles have appeared in The Wall Street Journal, The Washington Times, National Review, and other publications.

Graham left the MRC to serve in 2001and 2002 as White House Correspondent for World, a national weekly Christian news magazine. He returned in 2003. Before joining the MRC, Graham served as press secretary for the campaign of U.S. Rep. Jack Buechner (R-Mo.) in 1988, and in 1987, he served as editor of Organization Trends, a monthly newsletter on philanthropy and politics by the Washington-based Capital Research Center.

Graham is a native of Viroqua, Wisconsin and graduated from Bemidji State University in northern Minnesota. 

Latest from Tim Graham

The National Football League’s preseason is under way, and National Anthem-hating quarterback Colin Kaepernick still doesn’t have an NFL job. One can easily identify the liberal journalists by their anguish over this so-called injustice. You can also identify them by their dishonest arguments. Washington Post sports columnist Jerry Brewer pulled out a very large straw man on August 17 in a column headlined “Days of docile black athlete have ended. Get used to it.”


The Huffington Post raised eyebrows with their shade-throwing at departing White House strategist Steve Bannon. Their first headline on their home page read “GOY, BYE!” The Jewish word for a non-Jew is usually not seen as derogatory, but it sounded derogatory in this usage. You know you've raised eyebrows when Keith Olbermann suggests you've become a little unglued. HuffPost editor Lydia Polgreen cheered it as an "epic splash."


So much of the liberal media’s spin is about creating an anti-Republican momentum, or in this era an anti-Trump momentum. Take Politico’s Friday story headlined “President’s arts and humanities committee resigns over Trump’s Charlottesville response.”

Edward-Isaac Dovere began:"Another advisory group is walking away from President Donald Trump after his equivocation on neo-Nazis and white supremacists, with the President’s Committee on the Arts and Humanities resigning en masse Friday morning." How dramatic is this if the entire commission was appointed by Obama, and is a conga line of Obama supporters?


Political reporters sounded like they were headed for fainting couches after President Trump’s press event at Trump Tower. Reporters professed incredulity that Trump would continue to criticize “anti-fascist” violence, as if those events mattered. The president's declaration that there were fine people on “both sides” of Saturday’s events sounded like people marching with Nazi flags were fine. But the media protected Barack Obama when he sounded tone-deaf after Americans died.


The Associated Press vice president for standards announced that they will try to avoid using the term “alt-right” to describe neo-Nazis and white supremacists, since it "may exist primarily as a public relations device." To which many conservatives will say: Good, we’ve never wanted to be associated with those noxious beliefs. The AP wasn't that sensitive to positive sounds of the self-described "Antifa" or "anti-fascist" movement....because they can barely report that such groups exist.


CNN delighted in reporting the results of a recent poll question which asked: “How much do you trust the things you hear in official communications from the White House? Do you trust almost all, most of it, just some of it, or nothing at all?” Forty-three percent picked “some of it,” as people tend to do in a poll. Twenty-four percent chose “almost all” or “most,” and 30 percent picked “nothing at all.” CNN spun this as a victory for "journalism."


On Tuesday morning, NPR’s Morning Edition skipped over an inconvenient part of a leftist chant as they ripped down a statue honoring the Conferate soldier in Durham, North Carolina. Jeff Tiberii of NPR affiliate WUNC-FM began by reporting the protesters chanted "No KKK, No Fascist USA" bounced off the old county courthouse in Durham, leaving out the phrase "No Cops." Or the phrase "No Trump."


This is a good demonstration of the worst use of anonymous sources -- not to provide sensitive and valuable information, but to insult people with no consequences. Yahoo News is circulating a report from Tom Porter of the dying husk of a magazine called Newsweek about how President Trump announced his daughter Ivanka would had the U.S. delegation at the Global Entrepreneurship Summit in southern India in November. The magazine writer noted a former Time reporter tweeted that an Indian diplomat, whose name he didn't reveal, remarked on Ivanka: "We regard Ivanka Trump the way we do half-wit Saudi princes. It's in our national interest to flatter them.”


Everyone expected the liberal media to hound President Trump to denounce his "base" of white supremacists and neo-Nazis specifically after the vehicular homicide in Charlottesville on Saturday, and once other Republicans showed how it was done, the media pressure intensified. But it takes a special kind of liberal-media jerk to denounce the actual Republican Nazi-denouncers as just positioning for the 2020 campaign. Meet New York Times reporter Eric Lipton.


New York Times columnist Thomas Friedman advised the Democrats to embrace some of Donald Trump's beliefs, because "Some things are true even if Donald Trump believes them!" If they hope to attract Trump voters in the midterms they will have to make some moves toward the president. But if you look at his list, you'll notice the TV news elite doesn't want to acknowledge any truth on Trump's "gut issues." 


MRC's Brent Baker caught a nasty attack from Hollywood director Rob Reiner on MSNBC's airwaves Saturday after the news broke that a woman counter-protesting white supremacists was hit and killed by a car backing up at extreme speed. Reiner called Trump an "accessory" to the death for "stoking this stuff" of white resentment. Reiner recently tweeted about the need for "all-out war" on the president. 


Conservative CNN analyst Ben Ferguson was one of the first pundits to face liberal-media anger over President Trump's Twitter reaction to a vicious vehicular homicide against Klan counter-protesters in Charlottesville, Virginia on Saturday afternoon. “We condemn in the strongest possible terms this egregious display of hatred, bigotry, and violence on many sides — on many sides,” Trump said.


The world of television and how Hollywood delivers it keeps changing. Streaming services like Netflix, Hulu, and Amazon have become prestige brands whose original programming draws a pile of Emmy nominations. But as much as technology changes, some things remain the same. The entertainment factories keep ripping on Republican politicians in the crudest terms.


Former CBS News correspondent and Fox News analyst Bernard Goldberg ran through a list of polls showing President Trump "embarrassed" America, then championed a column by never-Trumper Bret Stephens in The New York Times challenging Trump backers: "If the president were to sexually assault a woman in the Oval Office tomorrow, would you still justify your vote on the view that Neil Gorsuch's elevation to the Supreme Court made it all worthwhile?"


In April of 2004, New York Times White House correspondent Elisabeth Bumiller rudely challenged President George W. Bush: “Two and a half years later, do you feel any personal responsibility for September 11?” Bumiller is now the paper’s Washington bureau chief, and she can’t even take personal responsibility when her newspaper falls flat on its factual face.

The Times is under fire for its un-factual report that the Trump administration was suppressing a draft of a climate change report that, oops, had been posted on the Internet in January, making it comical to read the boast "A copy of it was obtained by the New York Times," as if the Internet was a secret hideaway.


It was not a Mensa meeting when Larry King interviewed British comedian Russell Brand about socialism and fascism, among other topics. Brand cast Trump as a grotesque figure – talk about the pot calling the kettle black – but said he at least seemed authentic. King shot back “But he’s authentic/not-authentic. Because, does he have a philosophy?” Brand held up Norwegian socialism as the "answer" for the world, and King told Brand he looked "almost Jesus-like." 


CNN reporter Jim Acosta pitched another fit in the White House briefing room on August 2, asserting that Trump’s immigration policy was refuted by a poem at the Statue of Liberty. Trump aide Stephen Miller fought him tooth and nail, slamming him for a “cosmopolitan bias.” There was no doubt that the liberal elites would sympathize with acidic Acosta. But here’s what’s surprising: when the Washington Post "Fact Checker" team evaluated Miller vs. Acosta, they had to admit Miller was correct on all three statements evaluated.


Breitbart’s being mocked by “mainstream” media figures on Twitter for reporting on emails New York Times environment reporter/activist Coral Davenport sent to sympathetic fellow greens at the Environmental Protection Agency to produce hard-hitting reports on Trump’s EPA boss Scott Pruitt.


Here’s one way you can tell liberal reporters are upset that Stephen Miller embarrassed Jim Acosta and his “cosmopolitan bias” and “ignorance” from the White House podium. The Washington Post gossip section is complaining about the alleged hypocrisy of his elitist condominium home. On the front page of Tuesday’s Style section – the “Reliable Source” gossip column is typically on page 2 – came the headline “Trump adviser has his own ‘cosmopolitan’ abode in DC.” This is not how they treated Bernie Sanders when he bought his third home. 


Vice President Mike Pence denounced as “fake news” an imaginative front-page Sunday New York Times story on Republicans quietly plotting to run for president in 2020 in case, as their headline intimated, “Beleaguered Trump Isn’t on the Ballot.” Reporters Jonathan Martin and Alexander Burns wildly speculated in the first paragraph that “Mike Pence’s schedule is so full of political events that he is acting more like a second-term vice president hoping to clear the field than a No. 2 sworn in a little over six months ago.”