As if Weekends with Alex Witt weren’t bad enough, viewers were subjected to a weekday with Alex Witt as she guest-hosted the 11 a.m. hour of MSNBC Live on Friday. During a discussion with RNC communication director Sean Spicer, Witt brought up New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s recent insulting remarks about “extreme conservatives.” The weekend host played a clip of Cuomo’s comments and then tried to turn them into an indictment of the Tea Party.

Witt demanded of Spicer: 



Phil Griffin, head of the MSNBC cable television channel, told Marisa Guthrie of the Hollywood Reporter that he accepts responsibility for recent embarrassments that led Alec Baldwin and Martin Bashir to leave the network and Melissa Harris-Perry to offer a tearful on-air apology.

"These were judgment calls made by some of our people. We handled them. We were transparent. That is our philosophy: Be factual, and step up when you make a mistake,” Griffin asserted. “We took responsibility for them and took action. They were unfortunate,” but “I don't think it hurt us in any way.”



Sometimes I think people at MSNBC have Sarah Palin on the brain.

In a Morning Joe segment about Melissa Harris-Perry’s apology to the Romney family for mocking their adopted black grandson, and former Governor Mitt Romney’s classy acceptance of said apology, host Joe Scarborough for some reason decided to take a totally unprovoked and unnecessary cheap shot at Sarah Palin (video follows with transcript and commentary):



Following Melissa Harris-Perry's smear on Mitt Romney's adopted black grandson - the third in a series of recent high-profile faux pas by MSNBC hosts - Fox News media analyst Howard Kurtz asked a question Friday whose answer appears to definitively be "Yes."

"[H]as the channel developed a culture in which harsh personal attacks are encouraged, or at least tolerated?"



When he revealed to Fox News Channel viewers the winner of the Media Research Center's liberal media Quote of the Year, substitute host Eric Bolling couldn't "run the actual footage" of the description of the disgusting scatalogical treatment that former MSNBC Martin Bashir wished on Sarah Palin "because it's too obscene" for television, MRC founder and president Brent Bozell noted on the January 2 edition of Hannity.

What's also obscene, Bozell complained, was how MSNBC executives never expressed any disgust at Bashir's comments (video below):



How much do you need to know about a subject before expressing a strong opinion during a panel on MSNBC? Apparently very little, as Washington Post columnist Jonathan Capehart took part in a Monday afternoon discussion on the future of the Washington Redskins National Football League team since coach Mike Shanahan had just been fired.

Kristen Welker -- fill-in host for that weekday's edition of Andrea Mitchell Reports -- asked: “Are the Redskins stronger moving forward without Shanahan?” Capehart replied: “You’re asking the wrong guy here. I don’t know anything about football.” Instead, he turned to a liberal talking point: “But this much I do know: The name of the football team, personally speaking, is an abomination and that they should change it.”



Wrapping up the Media Research Center’s “Best Notable Quotables of 2013,” it's time to present the “Quote of the Year” for 2013, and the top two runners-up, as selected by our panel of judges.

Past “winners” include Discover magazine's Melissa Lafsky, who took the prize in 2009 for this reflection on Mary Jo Kopechne, who drowned in the back seat of Senator Ted Kennedy's car four decades earlier: “[One wonders what] Mary Jo Kopechne would have had to say about Ted’s death, and what she’d have thought of the life and career that are being (rightfully) heralded. Who knows — maybe she’d feel it was worth it.”

In 1998, then-Time contributor Nina Burleigh was recognized for declaring how she “would be happy to give him [Bill Clinton] a blow job just to thank him for keeping abortion legal. I think American women should be lining up with their presidential kneepads on to show their gratitude for keeping the theocracy off our backs.” (This year’s winners and corresponding videos after the jump.)



Today’s installment of the Media Research Center’s “Best Notable Quotables of 2013,” as selected by our 42 expert judges: The “Damn Those Conservatives Award,” recounting journalists’ nastiest attacks on conservatives.

Past winners of this venerable award include: Nina Totenberg in 1991, for verbally accosting then-Senator Alan Simpson after a Nightline appearance on October 9 of that year: “You big [expletive]....You are so full of [expletive]. You are an evil man....You’re a bitter and evil man and all your colleagues hate you.”

In 2005, Helen Thomas took top honors for a quote she gave The Hill newspaper: “The day I say Dick Cheney is going to run for President, I’ll kill myself. All we need is one more liar.” Luckily for Helen, Mr. Cheney did not choose to run in 2008. (This year’s winners and videos after the jump.)



Last week, the Media Research Center announced our “Best Notable Quotables of 2013,” reviewing the worst media bias of the year as selected by the 42 expert judges who reviewed dozens of quotes.

During the first half of 2013, liberals hoped they could leverage the tragedy of last year’s horrible shooting in Newtown, Connecticut, to push through their long-sought wish list of new federal gun restrictions, and the media cheered them on. Here are the quotes our judges designated as the worst of the worst, as catalogued in the MRC’s “Gunning for the Second Amendment Award.” (Winning quotes and video below the jump.)



After Martin Bashir lost his MSNBC job for making a vile anatomical suggestion, you might think that others at the "Lean Forward" network would be circumspect about engaging in comparable crudeness.

But that didn't stop John Heilemann on today's Morning Joe. Whereas Bashir's remark focused on the beginning of the alimentary canal, Heilemann's went to its other extremity. Asked how he'd deal with Senator Rand Paul's theory that extending unemployment benefits does the unemployed a disservice, Heilmann said "I'd tell Rand Paul to stick that where it belongs." View the video after the jump.



This week, the Media Research Center announced our “Best Notable Quotables of 2013,” reviewing the worst media bias of the year, as selected by our panel of 42 expert judges.

2013 was the year that scandal after scandal — from the IRS targeting the Tea Party, to Benghazi, to the lies surrounding ObamaCare, and on and on — hit the Obama administration, but journalists kept acting as if the President and his team were clean as a whistle. So today, the results of our “Move Along, Nothing to See Here Award,” for denying Obama’s scandals.  (Winning quotes and video below the jump.)



Is there an anatomical limit to how many times someone can put their foot in their mouth?

Consider the case of CNN's Piers Morgan who on Twitter moments ago actually accused former Alaska Governor Sarah Palin of getting Martin Bashir fired by MSNBC: