During the past few days, several news outlets -- including the New York Times and CNN -- have reported that during Hillary Clinton’s 2008 presidential campaign, the Democratic candidate “overruled” a sexual misconduct charge made by one of her senior advisers. Most national media outlets skipped over that Clinton-embarrassing scoop.


Sunday’s New York Times carried reporter Amy Chozick’s exit interview with Cecile Richards, the retiring president of Planned Parenthood: “Planned Parenthood Chief, Exiting, Plans Her Next Move.” She led off with an unlikely anecdote from Richards making pro-lifers out as hypocrites and the leader of America’s largest abortion mill as an advocate for women’s health care.


Bye-bye Hillary? Amy Chozick’s profile on the front of the New York Times Sunday Review featured the headline “Without Her.” It was a regretful (possible) goodbye to Hillary the high-profile feminist heroine, while crediting her with igniting the #MeToo movement, and postponing mention of her inconvenient husband as long as possible: "Hillary Clinton, the first woman who had a real shot at the presidency, has finally set off a national awakening among women. The only catch? She did it by losing."


Twin toadying: New York Times political reporter Amy Chozick relished Hillary Clinton and other women D.C. liberal feminist figures (both in and out of power) in two stories Sunday, one on the front of Sunday Styles and one on the front of Sunday Business. Chozick, who led the paper’s coverage of Hillary Clinton’s failed presidential campaign, couldn’t help fawning over Clinton even in a mildly critical story.


In the New York Times Sunday Review, chief Hillary Clinton campaign reporter Amy Chozick (who is writing a book on the campaign) tells tales from the makeup room at sexist, biased Fox News in “Hillary, Roger, and Me.” The story’s text box: “Ailes made female reporters look like models, and Clinton like a criminal.” Chozick’s distaste for conservative-leaning television was apparent. She implied that it was just a shame that “poetic justice” wasn’t served, and that Hillary Clinton didn’t bring down Trump and Ailes herself.


The New York Times is getting awful cocky about big Democratic victories on November 7. One of the two leading stories on the front of Monday’s paper: “Obama Targets G.O.P. Control of Statehouses.” The other lead story found no worries for Hillary Clinton’s campaign in the home stretch: “Victory In Sight, Clinton Presses Beyond Trump – Appeals to Vote Early – With Lead in the Polls, She Turns to Backing Other Democrats.”


The New York Times coverage of the final presidential debate was dominated by what it termed “a remarkable statement that seemed to cast doubt on American democracy” -- Trump’s refusal to state he would accept the results of next month’s presidential election, along with a cutting front-page opinion on how Hillary flustered Trump. There was also another ideologically slanted fact-check of the debate.


On her MSNBC show on Wednesday, anchor Andrea Mitchell referred to the leaked e-mails from Hillary Clinton campaign chairman John Podesta as “an incredible, rich narrative of what was going on inside the campaign” but then asked New York Times reporter Amy Chozick “what do we see as the really, you know, smoking guns, if you will, in these e-mails?”


The second presidential debate at Washington University in St. Louis on Sunday night was widely seen as a decent performance by Donald Trump, but the New York Times frantically spun away from Trump’s attacks on Hillary Clinton for enabling her husband’s treatment of women. The NYT's Haberman  dismissed a press conference of women accusing Bill Clinton of sexual assaults: “If anyone was wondering how ugly tonight is going to get, Trump just answered it." The Times' fact-checking also found Trump's debate claims false by a staggering 13:1 ratio.


The New York Times played preemptive defense for Hillary Clinton as Trump telegraphed a possible hit on Bill Clinton’s dark sexual past, with the Times dismissing claims of sexual assaults by Bill Clinton as "disputed" and trying hard to turn the tables on Trump and his past infidelities:"...he also contended that infidelity was 'never a problem' during his three marriages, though his first ended in an ugly divorce after Mr. Trump began a relationship with the woman who became his second wife."


During the first presidential debate Monday night, Hillary Clinton brought up a two-decade old Donald Trump “controversy” over complaints he made about Miss Universe 1996, Alicia Machado, regarding her post-pageant weight gain. Trump took the bait, and the New York Times eagerly glorified Machado, carrying water for the Clinton campaign while burying unflattering details from Machado’s past. Republican citizens could only dream of such coverage when they dare attack Democrats.


On Monday's Andrea Mitchell Reports on MSNBC, host Mitchell displayed the latest example of a journalist trying to push blame for Hillary Clinton's history of being secretive onto her political opponents "beating up on her" and causing her to feel the need to be defensive. During a discussion of Clinton withholding from the press that she had pneumonia, thus leading it to be a surprise when she fainted during a 9/11 commemoration, Mitchell wondered if pressure from Donald Trump and Rudy Giuliani made her be secretive about it.