P.J. Gladnick

P.J. Gladnick's picture
Contributing Writer


I am probably the only writer on NewsBusters to have received an award from the Soviet Union. It was for my work as an American correspondent for Krokodil Magazine which you can see chronicled in I Was A Commie Writer.

I live in South Florida which is full of eccentrics which is why I feel right at home here. My main accomplishments in life were winning a bottle of aftershave when I was eight and having the biggest PING List (over 1000 Pingees) on the Free Republic forum for my DUmmie FUnnies blog. This is fortunate since I suffer severely from Ping List Envy. 

Prior to the advent of the Web, I wrote a syndicated humor column that appeared in dozens of newspapers throughout North America. Only complete humility forbids me from telling you that my columns appeared in the Houston Chronicle, St. Petersburg Times, L.A Herald-Examiner, Winnipeg Free Press, Cleveland Plain Dealer, Vancouver Sun, and lots of other periodicals that I am much to humble to list. 

 Oh, I also produced an award-winning satirical comix website called PJ's Comix. This sort of balances out the fact that I am the WORST basketball player in the world.

My frequent commentaries (or rantings for those who don't appreciate me) can be found at my DUmmie FUnnies YouTube Channel.

Latest from P.J. Gladnick

Brutal.

That's the way to sum up the Daily Beast description of wealthy Democrat candidate for president, Tom Steyer. The purpose of their Saturday article by David De La Fuente was to shame the Democrats into including "candidates of color' at their next presidential debate but a big take away from the story was that it basically described Steyer as a scam artist. 



The Daily Beast somehow expects history to be rewritten. Why? Because an accurate portrayal of history could help Donald Trump. The history the Daily Beast is upset about is the portrayal of Richard Jewell in the film "Richard Jewell" as a victim of the FBI and much of the media for being put forward as the suspect in the 1996 Centennial Olympic Park bombing in Atlanta Georgia. The reason for the Daily Beast's discomfort is that they think it makes the film pro-Trump. 



Which American president of the past fifty years has been toughest on the Chinese? The immediate answer to any rational person possessing the slightest bit of sentience would, of course, be President Donald Trump. However, according to Tuesday's Washington Post fantasy by their Beijing bureau chief, Anna Fifield, the Chinese government loves Trump because they are supposedly able to manipulate him by reading his tweets and easily bribe him. Yes, bribe him.



One measure of the rapidly declining fortunes of the House impeachment inquiry is the sharply contrasting tune of two Politico articles about a New Jersey Congresswoman (D-Naturally) regarding that issue. Exactly two months ago it was a very different political world as Michael Kruse went full Drama Queen describing the choice of freshman Congresswoman Mikie Sherrill to support an impeachment inquiry despite a pledge to her constituents to concentrate on the issues. 



For months the mainstream media has been portraying China's President Xi Jingping as having a much stronger hand than a supposedly weaker President Trump in the current trade war. However, CNBC's Jim Cramer wasn't buying that at all on Monday's Squawk Box. In fact he was very critical of the American press for the way they have been reporting this situation even going so far as to say that despite what the press has been saying, Xi is actually in a much weaker position than Trump.



Do you have a bizarre desire to both bore and annoy your fellow Thanksgiving dinner guests? Well, good news! CNN's Zachary B. Wolf on Wednesday provided a handy dandy guide on how to easily accomplish this task with "Get smart on impeachment before Thanksgiving dinner."



A sure sign that the impeachment of President Trump is in trouble, as reflected by declining support for it by the public according to polls, is the sheer desperation displayed by Politico legal affairs columnist Renato Mariotti. No one at Politico has been a bigger cheerleader for impeachment than Mariotti and the recent decline in public interest in this seems to be sending poor Renato over the edge. 



On CNN Saturday, host Michael Smerconish recommended that a bunch of gossipers be named as Time's "Person of the Year." The gossipers he had in mind were the diplomats who appeared at the House Impeachment Inquiry and testified based on second and third hand hearsay. Hearsay, of course, is what gossip is, namely relaying information that they heard from somebody else and, often, the person they heard it from also heard it from someone else as well.



It is no surprise to find out that the Democrats are impeaching President Trump for strictly political reasons. What is a surprise is that Atlantic magazine revealed that is the main motivation for impeachment. 

 



Swing voters are not reacting well to the Democrat impeachment effort. A Politico article written by Gabby Orr reveals a distinct lack of support for impeachment by voters in focus groups. The survey was conducted by a pro-Trump super PAC called America First Action, but they screened out all voters who were committed to voting either for or against Trump in 2020: "participants were asked if they thought Trump should be impeached. Not a single person raised a hand..."



Perhaps Bloomberg writer Hannah Elliott might want to consider shedding her social justice warrior armor while reviewing films such as the popular Ford v Ferrari  because her obsession about "diversity" absurdly clouds her review. Elliott's antagonism to what she sees as an unforgiveable depiction of the white male oriented world of car racing in the 1960s begins with the title, "Ford v Ferrari Depicts a Generation of Car Guys That’s Best Left Behind," and continues throughout her SJW hit piece disguised as a review.



Buried deep within YouTube's new Terms of Service, due to go into effect on December 10, is an ominous clause. Perhaps they hoped few or, better yet, none would notice that it has the potential to destroy viewpoints with which YouTube and its parent company Google disagree, namely conservative channels. The good news is that the TOS clause in question which has the potential to wipe out many conservative channels has been spotlighted by several websites and YouTubers, including Mark Dice.



Cenk Uygur, former MSNBC host and co-founder of the leftist YouTube channel The Young Turks, has announced his candidacy for the seat that Katie Hill resigned from in disgrace, the 25th Congressional District in California. One of his campaign promises that I'm sure he will be able to fulfill is to fight Republicans like "someone who's going to rip their face off." The Hollywood Reporter article about his upcoming campaign is headlined "Cenk  Uygur Unloads on Rivals in Race to Replace Katie Hill in Congress: 'I'm Going to Maul Them.'"



Justice for Taylor Swift! Yeah, now that's a cause that your average working American can get behind. And it is also a cause taken up by presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren which has resulted in widespread mockery. Okay, the mockery hasn't quite reached the levels inspired by the reaction to her hyping of a DNA test last year that revealed that Warren is maybe 1/1024 Native American but it is up there.



Sean Spicer is a lousy dancer. In fact, he is a downright horrible dancer. The good news is that Spicer seems to have no problem living with that obvious defect. However,  the fact that the former White House Press Secretary remains on ABC's Dancing With the Stars week after week has driven New York Times dance critic Gia Courlas into a state of extreme outrage.



The Atlantic Magazine admitted (approvingly) that the Latest Saturday Night Live skit was less a satire and really more of a campaign ad for Senator Elizabeth Warren. The Sunday article by Spencer Kornhaber made this admission both in the title, "SNL Runs an Ad for Elizabeth Warren," and body of the article. 



CNN's Jim Sciutto took the idea that the consumer and the manufacturers ultimately pay for tariffs in the form of increased prices of imported goods to absurdly assert that the United States does not collect tariffs. It wasn't just an unfortunate slip of the tongue on the part of Sciutto because he emphasized his silly assertion twice and both times, as you can see and hear in the video, with an air of superior authority to Peter Navarro who happens to have an extensive academic background in economics.



While reading the absurd New York Times impeachment porn fantasy by Carl Hulse, you have to pinch yourself every few sentences to remind yourself that you are actually reading a bizarre what-if written by the chief Washington correspondent for that newspaper and not the wild speculations of a DUer loon at the Democratic Underground. What-if an asteroid were to hit the planet to disrupt the impeachment process? Nope. Something even more ridiculous.

 

>What if the Senate votes to convict Trump after he was impeached by the House, meaning about 20 Republican senators would willing commit political suicide to satisfy the Democrats, and then, and then just a majority of them could vote to keep him from running for President again.



CNBC's John Harwood, best known for his extreme bias against Republican and conservatives and in favor of Democrats, has let his Trump Derangement Syndrome get the better of him in the form of tweeting displeasure over the death of ISIS leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi. Like many Democrats, Harwood was outraged that Trump went around members of Congress, including Nancy Pelosi.

 



You pretty much know that the leftist hive of Teen Vogue would exclude conservatives in its survey of youth politics when the synopsis of each young person from 16 to 24 featured is prefaced by the sentient being's preferred pronouns. Preferred pronouns, of course, are one of the easy symbols to recognize that any such article would act as if conservative or Republican youth would be considered to be creatures from another world thus not even within the Teen Vogue realm of being considered for attention.