Nina Burleigh really blew it this time. Wednesday morning, Newsweek retracted their reporter's Monday story on "How an Alt-Right Bot Network Took Down Al Franken." Newsweek's move leads to a bigger question: When will the Associated Press correct or retract reports claiming Florida high school massacre perpetrator Nikolas Cruz was connected with white nationalism?



At the Associated Press on Friday, economics writer Paul Wiseman attempted to rewrite history, pretending that "trickle down" economics is a term Republicans have used for their economic plans since the days of Ronald Reagan, and that the current GOP tax plan which has made it through the House and is being considered by the Senate is more of the same thing. In fact, Reagan's policies, which were supply-side, growth-oriented and behavior-changing, did not cause only tiny amounts of money to "trickle down" to everyday Americans; they instead led to explosive and sustained employment and across-the-board income growth which hasn't been seen since.



After a six-month respite, the Associated Press has started aggressively going after Donald Trump and his administration over conditions in the U.S. economy. In an opening salvo at 1:25 p.m. on Tuesday, the AP criticized as "not completely accurate" the following completely accurate Trump tweet: "Highest Stock Market EVER, best economic numbers in years, unemployment lowest in 17 years, wages raising."



On Friday, a lawyer for the New York Times, arguing before a Manhattan federal judge, claimed that the paper made "an honest mistake in posting the editorial" claiming that Sarah Palin directly incited the shooting of Arizona Congresswoman Gabby Giffords in 2011.



Desperate to make a case that voter-ID laws kept "many" people who should be allowed to vote from casting ballots in Wisconsin in November, two reporters at the Associated Press claimed "it is not hard to find" examples of Badger State residents who were "turned away." Left unexplained is how reporters Christina A. Cassidy and Ivan Moreno apparently could only identify four people out of hundreds of thousands allegedly affected after six months of searching. Despite a headline claiming that those involved faced "insurmountable" barriers, each person cited could have successfully cast a ballot, but failed to do so because of inadequate follow-through.



Thursday at NewsBusters, I noted that all of the major-media "fact-checking" efforts recognized by Duke University's ReportersLab.org website lean left, and that almost all of them are quite decidedly on the left. That only begins to explain how the "fact-checkers" are distorting the news landscape.



Reporter Jennifer Steinhauer has been at the New York Times since 1989, and has been covering Congress since 2010. Despite her decades of experience, she committed two horribly ignorant errors in her Thursday coverage of the Senate's vote to undo an Obama administration rule which had prevented states from "blocking funding for family planning clinics that also provide abortions."



It's becoming quite obvious that the Associated Press, which has tilted ever more to the left for several decades, has been on the verge of going completely off the rails since their coordinated plan to elect Hillary Clinton failed in November. Naturally, the AP has directed its ever-increasing hostility at Donald Trump and his administration since that fateful day — seldom more obviously than in Tammy Webber's treatment of Trump's tribute to Ryan and Carryn Owens in his Tuesday speech to a joint session of Congress.



On Wednesday, an early Associated Press report following the confirmations of two of Donald Trump's cabinet nominees employed extraordinarily strident and bitter language, portraying Republican Senate Committee which approved those nominations as de facto bullies who were "unilaterally" imposing their will. An evening revision updating that afternoon report expanded that portrayal to include Trump's Supreme Court nomination of Neil Gorsuch. Naturally, there's no indication that the previous Democratic Senate under Majority Leader Harry Reid employed the same "nuclear option" tactic when his party was had control.



In a late Wednesday afternoon NewsBusters post, I commented on the extraordinary hostility reporters at the Associated Press exhibited towards Donald Trump and his administration during their first two full business days in power. In that post, I wondered if they might be carrying a childish grudge over not being able to ask the first question at Press Secretary Sean Spicer's briefings, as they virtually always have since last decade. An unbylined late Tuesday AP report spotted by John Hinderaker at Powerline confirmed my suspicion. They're mad as hornets, and clearly can't handle it.



It's hardly a secret that establishment press news organizations have had a hard time coping with the reality that Donald Trump is this nation's President-Elect.

Having worked so zealously in their failed effort to push Hillary Clinton over the finish line while abandoning all remnants of journalistic standards, the Associated Press and its reporters appear to be among the hardest hit. That status is exemplified in the AP's November 18 temper tantrum disguised as a report on Trump's Cabinet and staff selections.



The New York Times has not merely climbed aboard the bandwagon of Truth, which exalts the fraudulent September 2004 CBS 60 Minutes report about President George W. Bush's Texas Air National Guard Service. It's now serving as the film's de facto lead apologist.

The most recent example demonstrating how deeply in the tank the Old Gray Lady has gone is Stephen Holden's Thursday film review published in Friday's print edition. Holden's praise comes from an alternative universe where genuine "truth" clearly doesn't matter, and uses a tortured analogy which in reality disproves his attempt at making a point (bolds are mine throughout this post):