In an Internet meme from President Obama’s first term, George W. Bush asked America, “Miss Me Yet?” Even though The Daily Beast’s Michael Tomasky is a liberal, he does miss Dubya, after a fashion. In a Monday column, Tomasky called Bush “one of the worst presidents” ever but conceded that when he was POTUS, the Republican party was a mere “war-starting, economy-wrecking” outfit, while today’s GOP is far worse in terms of “open racism and paranoid sociopathy.” Tomasky sees Bush as well-positioned to spearhead the reform Republicans need: "After Trump (hopefully) loses, Bush should try to lead the GOP back to planet Earth…The best remaining way for Bush to salvage his reputation is to trash Trump’s.”



In its coverage of Egypt's declaration of a national holiday to mark the ouster of Islamist dictator Mohammed Morsi (also spelled "Mursi") three years ago, the Associated Press recast history. It completely ignored Morsi's assumption of de facto dictatorial powers only months after he was "freely elected" in 2012, his government's brutal repression while he was in power, and his Muslim Brotherhood's attempt to ramrod sharia law and socialism into the country's constitution and legal framework.

The wire service, by noting that "millions of Egyptians took to the streets on June 30 (2013), to call for Morsi to step down," also effectively admitted that it attempted to downplay the size of the protest crowds in its original reporting three years ago. Most other news services accurately reported at the time that "millions" had taken to the streets throughout Egypt, while the AP would only acknowledge "hundreds of thousands."



Roughly 24 hours after attacking Christianity as contributing to the Orlando terror attack on the gay night club, Wednesday’s CBS Evening News did their due diligence in devoting a full segment to how a slew of Islamic countries punish anyone who is or suspected of being gay with death. 



All the networks in the “big three” praised President Obama, during their evening shows on Tuesday, for taking the presumptive GOP nominee to task on how to fight the War on Terror. They all talked about Obama’s takedown in glowing terms, while pointing out how Donald Trump’s strategy breeds hate. NBC even saluted the Democratic Party for putting Obama and Hillary Clinton together to fight Trump. 



ThinkProgress LGBT Editor, Zach Ford, blames “conservative Christians” for the Orlando shooting, which tragically killed or injured over 100 people this past weekend. According to Ford, conservative Christians caused the shooting in two ways: by their own “violence” to the LGBT community and by their anti-Islamic sentiment, a “spark” for the attack.



In his second speech on Sunday morning's terrorist massacre in Orlando, Florida, President Barack Obama said on Monday that "the shooter was inspired by various extremist information that was disseminated over the Internet," that "we see no clear evidence that he was directed externally," and that "this is certainly an example of the kind of homegrown extremism that all of us have been so concerned about for a very long time."

The press, led as usual by the Associated Press, is certainly cooperating with those characterizations. Presumptive Democratic Party presidential nominee Hillary Clinton has clearly made up her mind that Omar Mateen committed a "lone wolf" attack, and that banning "assault weapons" would somehow prevent future such attacks. The problem, of course, is what one means by "homegrown" and "directed."



The Washington Post’s Anthony Faiola is worried about Germany. Actually, he’s worried about the thousands of Muslim refugees inundating the country and “testing the national will to protect minority rights adopted after World War II.”



On Tuesday, Twitchy and a number of other fine sites found what amounted to be one of the more hysterical corrections one will ever see and involved none other than everyone’s favorite liberal newspaper, The New York Times. 



Two weeks ago, yours truly posted on a very inadequate March 26 U.S.-distributed Associated Press story out of Glasgow the previous day (since expired) about the murder of Asad Shah. Despite the fact that far more information was known at the time, the wire service would only acknowledge that "the killing of a Muslim shopkeeper who wished Christians a happy Easter is being investigated as 'religiously prejudiced,'" and (four paragrahs in) that "The suspect, who police say is Muslim, has not been identified or charged." AP has not done a follow-up story, even though far more beyond what it failed to originally report is now known.

In a Washington Post "WorldViews" blog post on Friday, Max Bearak attempted to bring readers up to date, in the process exposing — but from all appearances acquiescing to — Orwellian attempts by the dominant Muslim community to disavow their religion's association with Shah's murder and to distance themselves from their hostility towards other faiths.



Perhaps it would be understandable if U.S. media outlets chose not to cover the death of Asad Shah in Scotland. After all, it occurred overseas, and only one person has died.

But the Associated Press did decide to cover the story and post it at its subscribers' U.S. news sites. As such, the AP has a duty to reveal what is known at the time its reports appear. Thus far, it has failed miserably. It is painfully obvious why that failure has occurred, namely because Asad Shah's death inconveniently answers the following question: "Why don't we hear more outrage from moderate Muslims over those who invoke Islam to justify terrorism and persecution, thereby, according to popular perception, highjacking their supposedly inherently peaceful religion?"



On his Sunday program, CNN's Fareed Zakaria asserted that the relationship between conservative/Republican leaders and the grassroots was "similar" to the "dynamic" between moderate Muslims and Islamists: "A main cause of the rise of extremism in the world of Islam has been the cowardice of Muslim moderates...It is now clear that a similar dynamic has been at play in the world of conservatism." He claimed "some of its most distinguished mainstream members" of the conservative movement "have embraced the rhetoric and tactics of the extremes."



With France wracked by Islamic terrorism and anti-Semitic attacks, Thursday’s New York Times offered some valuable public relations on behalf of poor, downtrodden, persecuted Muslim immigrants, with Suzanne Daley, formerly the national editor for the paper, issuing a classic bleeding-heart report that skipped all the problems and came complete with hostile labeling of immigrant critics: “Rap Gives Poor Youths A Voice In France – Artists Confront The Far Right.” It’s part of the Times’ strange, intermittent “banlieue” beat, in which Times reporters whitewash the violence and terrorist sympathies that fester within unassimilated Muslim-dominated ghettos in France, in favor of a tale making them victims of government persecution.