Amelia Hamilton

Contributing Writer


Latest from Amelia Hamilton

Hulu's Four Weddings and a Funeral tv adaptation is...odd. Co-created by Richard Curtis, who created the original movie, and Mindy Kaling (The Mindy Project), I had high hopes that this team could deliver a heartfelt, funny comedy that either left out the politics or was somewhat balanced. Instead, Republicans and conservatives are overtly insulted and mocked.



The third season of Veronica Mars aired on the CW in 2007 and now, 12 years later, Hulu has brought it back. I am what one might call a dedicated "Marshmallow" - a superfan of the titular teen detective who was equal parts sarcastic and hard-boiled. Imagine both my excitement when I found out the show was coming back and my abject disappointment when I found out that this fourth season was chock full of liberal nonsense.



In the latest season of Netflix's Comedians in Cars Getting Coffee, released July 19, Ricky Gervais joins Jerry Seinfeld for two episodes. During this time, they reflect on the nature of comedy in today's easily offended culture that isn't so convinced about free speech. Ironically enough, they also tell a joke that is making headlines for, you guessed it, being offensive. 



Fans of Netflix's Stranger Things might remember Erica Sinclair, Lucas' little sister who stole the show in season two. She's back in season three and an absolute American hero. Not only does she join the team to save the world from the Russians, she makes sure everyone understands that it's all about capitalism versus communism. 



Netfilix released a new show on April 12, Special, that is supposedly a comedy, but is really a woke double whammy about a disabled gay man trying to make his way in the workplace. As if that wasn't enough, they sprinkle in more left-wing content along the way. Five minutes into the first episode, "Cerebral LOLzy," we find out that one of the main characters supposedly had an orgasm during an abortion.



Netflix's new comedyTurn Up Charlie is a strange mix of anti-liberal messages being delivered through the story and pro-liberal messages being said in the actual dialogue. Ultimately, it is about how the screwed-up entertainment industry can make people forget their priorities and the repercussions it has on a family, a decidedly anti-liberal point of view. However, the characters occasionally spout the kinds of things liberals who have never even met a Republican would say - like that their Republican parents used to shoot animals in the front yard.



Secret City: Under the Eagle, the second season of Netflix's Australian political drama released March 6, portrayed Americans as lying to their allies, droning their friends, and not caring if innocent people are hurt or killed in the process. This season finds reporter Harriet Dunkley (Anna Torv) investigating a cover up in the Australian government. When an explosion at a suburban home kills four people, it is initially blamed on a gas leak, then on the family's teenaged son, who survived. The truth, as it turns out, is far more sinister and, of course, the Americans are involved.



There were times when watching the new Netflix teen fantasy series The Order I genuinely wondered if they were intending for the show to sound satirical. In the first half of the first episode, viewers were treated to a reference to "one percenter parasites," new students at Belgrave College, where the show takes place, were directed to "male, female, and non-binary bathrooms" and given "how not to rape" pamphlets, and former president George W. Bush was compared to Mussolini. Unfortunately, I think this is the state of young adult content in 2019.



The Ranch is back on Netflix with the second half of season six and, while we used to be able to count on them to represent conservatives in the "flyover" states, they just couldn't resist getting in a dig at President Trump this time around. 



Have you been longing for a cartoon about drag queen superheroes? Nor was I, but Netflix has given us one anyway. It's Super Drags, which the streaming service describes as "three gay co-workers lead double lives as drag queen superheroes, saving the LGBTQ community from evil nemeses." Throughout the series, there is one nemesis who remains constant and, of course, he is religious. And looks like Hitler.



On paper, the new Amazon Prime original series Forever should be great. It stars Fred Armisen and Maya Rudolph as June and Oscar, a middle-class married couple in California. Those two actors together should have made it a hilarious comedy. Instead, Forever was a rambling and pointless slog and, in the second episode, unnecessarily insulting towards Christians. 



I'm a pretty big fan of the stories featuring Jack Ryan (there are more than 20 books by Tom Clancy, plus movies including Clear and Present DangerThe Hunt for Red October, and The Sum of All Fears), so I was delighted that Amazon Prime came out with a new series based on the American CIA officer called simply "Tom Clancy's Jack Ryan" on August 31.



This won't be much of a loss to conservative audiences, but Hulu's Casual just dropped its last 8 episodes on Tuesday. This new run of episodes was pretty much more of the same liberalism but with one twist - season four takes place a few years after season three, with creators saying that puts it at around 2022 or so.



One might expect Jerry Seinfeld's latest edition of Comedians in Cars Getting Coffee, "2018: Freshly Brewed," on Netflix to get political, since comedians just can't seem to help themselves right now in jumping on the Trump bashing train, so I was pleasantly surprised to find the focus on funny instead of on politics. In fact, when guests tried to get political, Seinfeld quickly shut them down, or - shock - they talked about liberal intolerance!



Kiss Me First, which is new to American audiences on Netflix, but originally premiered back in April in the UK, is a bizarre story for young adults. If it's not the appalling number of references to anal sex, it's the borderline encouragement of suicide or the overall idea that nothing matters because "lunatics are in charge now." Overall, I have to wonder what the creators were thinking, and what anyone was thinking, either here or abroad, in choosing to air it. 



Part 5 (otherwise known as season 3, part 1) of The Ranch, starring Ashton Kutcher, was released June 15 on Netflix and our heroes just found out that the gas pipeline, which was going to bring them some much-needed financial relief, has been canceled thanks to protesters. When Rooster meets one of the protesters in a bar, he tells her she "fucked up a lot of peoples' lives with that protest" and realizes that is the one thing that could stop him from hitting on an attractive woman. 



With Memorial Day weekend upon us, it's not all about a day off and a barbeque, it's about honoring and remembering those who made the ultimate sacrifice for our freedom. Really, it's something we should be doing all year long, but in Hollywood it's the opposite. They seem to take joy in dragging down our military. I guess it's too much to expect them to show some respect and gratitude to those who defend their right to free speech, though, isn't it?



In the third season of Bill Nye's not-so-humbly titled Netflix series Bill Nye Saves the World, there are an unusually large number of shots taken at religion. Even more awkward are the clumsy attempts at what seems to be outreach to people of faith, they are almost painful to watch they're so bad.



Holy Week is upon us and Easter, the holiest day of the Christian year, is Sunday. NewsBusters readers won’t be surprised to hear that popular culture isn’t kind to Christians, but you may not have seen some of the worst examples to have polluted our television screens in the last year.



I love a British mystery as much as, if not more than, the next guy, but I could barely make it through Collateral on Netflix. It was like they had a social justice checklist and created a storyline around it, then added in some extra characters to check the boxes they'd missed.