Amelia Hamilton

Contributing Writer


Latest from Amelia Hamilton

With Memorial Day weekend upon us, it's not all about a day off and a barbeque, it's about honoring and remembering those who made the ultimate sacrifice for our freedom. Really, it's something we should be doing all year long, but in Hollywood it's the opposite. They seem to take joy in dragging down our military. I guess it's too much to expect them to show some respect and gratitude to those who defend their right to free speech, though, isn't it?



In the third season of Bill Nye's not-so-humbly titled Netflix series Bill Nye Saves the World, there are an unusually large number of shots taken at religion. Even more awkward are the clumsy attempts at what seems to be outreach to people of faith, they are almost painful to watch they're so bad.



Holy Week is upon us and Easter, the holiest day of the Christian year, is Sunday. NewsBusters readers won’t be surprised to hear that popular culture isn’t kind to Christians, but you may not have seen some of the worst examples to have polluted our television screens in the last year.



I love a British mystery as much as, if not more than, the next guy, but I could barely make it through Collateral on Netflix. It was like they had a social justice checklist and created a storyline around it, then added in some extra characters to check the boxes they'd missed.



Sunday night means spending another hour with the most unbearable show on television- HBO's Here and Now, a show about a Portland (of course) academic, his wife (who runs an empathy training initiative for high schoolers), and their kids, one biological, the others adopted from countries that they believed had been wronged by America in some way. No, really. In the March 4 episode "Hide and Seek," we get to know the Shokrani family a little better, as well as their thoughts on Islam. 



How to Get Away WIth Murder has some pretty interesting ideas on race in America. In the March 1 episode "Lahey v. The Commonwealth of Pennsylvania," Annalise (Viola Davis) is headed to the Supreme Court with a big class-action judicial reform case alleging inadequate public representation for black and underpriveleged defendendents. Being a Shonda Rhimes show, this was an excuse for race-baiting comments. 



Will & Grace is kind of obsessed with saying that Republicans are secretly gay. Usually, the jokes (and I use the term loosely) are about Mike Pence but, in the March 1 episode "Three Wise Men," they mixed things up by making Senators John McCain and Lindsey Graham the targets of their aspersions.



Freeform's Grownish is significantly less political than its parent show Blackish but when it goes there, it really goes there. In the February 28 episode "Who Gon Stop Me," a drug dealer at Cal U is killed leading to a crackdown on campus drug use. That's a definite disappointment for main character Zoey Johnson (Yara Shahidi), whose narration opened the episode calling drug use one of "three major components that make college a blast." 



HBO's new drama Here and Now has basically become a parody of the left. It's full of trendy social justice themes, buzzwords, and Chicken Little-style angst that the sky is most certainly falling. The show could use the exact same storylines, even the same script, and come up with a hilarious satire about self-important liberals in the Pacific Northwest.



HBO's Here and Now continues to try to set the gold standard for being the most obnoxiously woke show on television. In its premiere last week, we met the main family, the Bayer-Boatwrights, who are made up of an academic, some kind of a counselor (we will see more in this week's episode), and their children adopted from around the world in a show of how "progressive and evolved they are."



The Freeform comedy Grownish follows Zoey Johnson (Yara Shahidi) after she leaves her family home on ABC's Blackish and goes off to college. She's growing up and learning new things and, on the February 14 episode "Erase Your Social," the lesson is about how to handle social media. Of course, they decided to make it about Trump.



Have you been looking to close out your weekend with a program that is insufferable and self-satisfied beyond measure? Then, boy, does HBO have the show for you! Here and Now premiered February 11 with its pilot episode "Eleven, Eleven," which introduced us to the painfully enlightened Bayer-Boatwright family. If you wonder how much of a cliche the show is, it opens with a dude in a man bun riding his bike down the streets of Portland. Of course. 



CW's comedy Jane the Virgin has gone through its ups and downs. In the early seasons, it wasn't terribly political. Then it became political (and terrible) as soon as Trump was elected, but it actually chilled out a little this year. So why, in the February 2 episode "Chapter Seventy-Three," did they feel the need to take a random dig at Ivanka Trump? 



Will & Grace really hates Mike Pence, that's nothing new. Usually, though, the show is suggesting that he hates gay people, not that he himself is secrely gay. That seemed to change in the February 1 episode "Staten Island Fairy." 



Fox's new medical drama The Resident was taken to task on Twitter upon its premiere last week for its completely unrealistic portrayal of what goes on in American healthcare and the January 29 episode "Comrades in Arms" was no different as it portrayed medical personnel ordering unnecessary tests to drive up costs and the hospital administration refusing to treat a dying illegal immigrant. 



The NBC comedy Superstore spent their January 25 episode exploring the difference between things that are real, things that are imaginary, and things that were once real and are now extinct. The episode title "Angels and Mermaids" might give you a clue as to how they treat faith in those discussions. 



Medical drama The Resident premiered on January 21 with its pilot episode, in which we get to know the doctors at the fictional Chastain Park Memorial Hospital in Atlanta. Chief of Surgery Dr. Randolph Bell (Bruce Greenwood) is highly-respected but, it turns out, it kind of a a jerk, and has an interesting take on the state of American immigration. 



The January 18 episode of Will & Grace was as offensive as ever. They took a bizarre number of shots at the Bible out of nowhere as well as delivering some stale Russia "jokes."



Alone Together is a new show on Freeform which chronicles depressing Millennial best friends Benji (Benji Afalo) and Esther (Esther Povitsky) living in Los Angeles. The second episode, "Road Trip," aired on January 17 and followed the pair going on a road trip with their friend Jeff (Edgar Blackmon) to celebrate Benji's birthday and we find out how they feel about Republicans in what might be the most disgusting way possible.



Proctor & Gamble has a new campaign out called "The Talk," which is encouraging people to talk about bias. Since the main character in Blackish, Dre (Anthony Anderson) works for a marketing firm, the January 16 episode "Bow Knows" was a tie-in with this campaign in which his team is tasked to work on it. Being the sole black member on the team, he spends the episode trying to figure out how to explain to the rest of them that every black parent must have a talk with their kids about the realities they will face.