Amelia Hamilton

Contributing Writer


Latest from Amelia Hamilton

On paper, the new Amazon Prime original series Forever should be great. It stars Fred Armisen and Maya Rudolph as June and Oscar, a middle-class married couple in California. Those two actors together should have made it a hilarious comedy. Instead, Forever was a rambling and pointless slog and, in the second episode, unnecessarily insulting towards Christians. 



I'm a pretty big fan of the stories featuring Jack Ryan (there are more than 20 books by Tom Clancy, plus movies including Clear and Present DangerThe Hunt for Red October, and The Sum of All Fears), so I was delighted that Amazon Prime came out with a new series based on the American CIA officer called simply "Tom Clancy's Jack Ryan" on August 31.



This won't be much of a loss to conservative audiences, but Hulu's Casual just dropped its last 8 episodes on Tuesday. This new run of episodes was pretty much more of the same liberalism but with one twist - season four takes place a few years after season three, with creators saying that puts it at around 2022 or so.



One might expect Jerry Seinfeld's latest edition of Comedians in Cars Getting Coffee, "2018: Freshly Brewed," on Netflix to get political, since comedians just can't seem to help themselves right now in jumping on the Trump bashing train, so I was pleasantly surprised to find the focus on funny instead of on politics. In fact, when guests tried to get political, Seinfeld quickly shut them down, or - shock - they talked about liberal intolerance!



Kiss Me First, which is new to American audiences on Netflix, but originally premiered back in April in the UK, is a bizarre story for young adults. If it's not the appalling number of references to anal sex, it's the borderline encouragement of suicide or the overall idea that nothing matters because "lunatics are in charge now." Overall, I have to wonder what the creators were thinking, and what anyone was thinking, either here or abroad, in choosing to air it. 



Part 5 (otherwise known as season 3, part 1) of The Ranch, starring Ashton Kutcher, was released June 15 on Netflix and our heroes just found out that the gas pipeline, which was going to bring them some much-needed financial relief, has been canceled thanks to protesters. When Rooster meets one of the protesters in a bar, he tells her she "fucked up a lot of peoples' lives with that protest" and realizes that is the one thing that could stop him from hitting on an attractive woman. 



With Memorial Day weekend upon us, it's not all about a day off and a barbeque, it's about honoring and remembering those who made the ultimate sacrifice for our freedom. Really, it's something we should be doing all year long, but in Hollywood it's the opposite. They seem to take joy in dragging down our military. I guess it's too much to expect them to show some respect and gratitude to those who defend their right to free speech, though, isn't it?



In the third season of Bill Nye's not-so-humbly titled Netflix series Bill Nye Saves the World, there are an unusually large number of shots taken at religion. Even more awkward are the clumsy attempts at what seems to be outreach to people of faith, they are almost painful to watch they're so bad.



Holy Week is upon us and Easter, the holiest day of the Christian year, is Sunday. NewsBusters readers won’t be surprised to hear that popular culture isn’t kind to Christians, but you may not have seen some of the worst examples to have polluted our television screens in the last year.



I love a British mystery as much as, if not more than, the next guy, but I could barely make it through Collateral on Netflix. It was like they had a social justice checklist and created a storyline around it, then added in some extra characters to check the boxes they'd missed.



Sunday night means spending another hour with the most unbearable show on television- HBO's Here and Now, a show about a Portland (of course) academic, his wife (who runs an empathy training initiative for high schoolers), and their kids, one biological, the others adopted from countries that they believed had been wronged by America in some way. No, really. In the March 4 episode "Hide and Seek," we get to know the Shokrani family a little better, as well as their thoughts on Islam. 



How to Get Away WIth Murder has some pretty interesting ideas on race in America. In the March 1 episode "Lahey v. The Commonwealth of Pennsylvania," Annalise (Viola Davis) is headed to the Supreme Court with a big class-action judicial reform case alleging inadequate public representation for black and underpriveleged defendendents. Being a Shonda Rhimes show, this was an excuse for race-baiting comments. 



Will & Grace is kind of obsessed with saying that Republicans are secretly gay. Usually, the jokes (and I use the term loosely) are about Mike Pence but, in the March 1 episode "Three Wise Men," they mixed things up by making Senators John McCain and Lindsey Graham the targets of their aspersions.



Freeform's Grownish is significantly less political than its parent show Blackish but when it goes there, it really goes there. In the February 28 episode "Who Gon Stop Me," a drug dealer at Cal U is killed leading to a crackdown on campus drug use. That's a definite disappointment for main character Zoey Johnson (Yara Shahidi), whose narration opened the episode calling drug use one of "three major components that make college a blast." 



HBO's new drama Here and Now has basically become a parody of the left. It's full of trendy social justice themes, buzzwords, and Chicken Little-style angst that the sky is most certainly falling. The show could use the exact same storylines, even the same script, and come up with a hilarious satire about self-important liberals in the Pacific Northwest.



HBO's Here and Now continues to try to set the gold standard for being the most obnoxiously woke show on television. In its premiere last week, we met the main family, the Bayer-Boatwrights, who are made up of an academic, some kind of a counselor (we will see more in this week's episode), and their children adopted from around the world in a show of how "progressive and evolved they are."



The Freeform comedy Grownish follows Zoey Johnson (Yara Shahidi) after she leaves her family home on ABC's Blackish and goes off to college. She's growing up and learning new things and, on the February 14 episode "Erase Your Social," the lesson is about how to handle social media. Of course, they decided to make it about Trump.



Have you been looking to close out your weekend with a program that is insufferable and self-satisfied beyond measure? Then, boy, does HBO have the show for you! Here and Now premiered February 11 with its pilot episode "Eleven, Eleven," which introduced us to the painfully enlightened Bayer-Boatwright family. If you wonder how much of a cliche the show is, it opens with a dude in a man bun riding his bike down the streets of Portland. Of course. 



CW's comedy Jane the Virgin has gone through its ups and downs. In the early seasons, it wasn't terribly political. Then it became political (and terrible) as soon as Trump was elected, but it actually chilled out a little this year. So why, in the February 2 episode "Chapter Seventy-Three," did they feel the need to take a random dig at Ivanka Trump? 



Will & Grace really hates Mike Pence, that's nothing new. Usually, though, the show is suggesting that he hates gay people, not that he himself is secrely gay. That seemed to change in the February 1 episode "Staten Island Fairy."