Callista Ring

MRC Contributing Writer


Latest from Callista Ring

If there was ever any doubt about the intentions of Sacha Baron Cohen’s Who is America?, Sunday night’s episode settles it. Three out of the four segments in tonight’s episode of the Showtime series mocked conservatives while none mocked liberals.



Showtime claims that its new series Who Is America? “explores the diverse individuals who populate our unique nation.” However, Sunday night’s premiere episode makes it clear what the show is actually about—ridiculing conservatives. In the premiere, Cohen takes the form of four different characters, complete with heavy make-up, costumes, and accents. Three out of the four segments mock conservatives through humiliation, the cheapest form of humor.



It was only a matter of time before a show centered on the LGBT community and AIDs in the late 1980s would push the myth that Ronald Reagan turned a blind eye to AIDs. Sunday night’s episode of FX’s Pose falsely claimed President Reagan “will not say the word ‘AIDS.’"



In case there’s any doubt left about the political leanings of billionaire media mogul Michael Bloomberg. The former Republican, turned “Independent” announced he will spend $80 million supporting Democrats in the 2018 midterm elections.



Tuesday night, TVLand’s normally apolitical sitcom Teachers joined the ranks of TV shows ridiculing religious people. In the episode, “Of Lice and Men,” public school teacher Mary Louise (Katie O’Brien) walks in on her pastor masturbating to a picture of her boyfriend.



The season finale of Showtime’s Billions culminated in U.S. Attorney Chuck Rhoades (Paul Giamatti) attempting to remove Trump appointed Attorney General Waylon “Jock” Jeffcoat (Clancy Brown) from office. Last episode, after Chuck discovered that AG Jeffcoat, a parody of AG Jeff Sessions, earned all of his money illegally, he plans to lure Jeffcoat into obstructing justice. 



FX’s new transgender drama series, Pose, boasts the largest LGBTQ cast ever assembled for a scripted TV show—but that’s not enough. The show also wants to tackle Trump-era politics…like literally every show on TV today. Pose follows a group of transgender/gay people and their community trying to find their way in 1987 New York City.



Showtime’s Billions continues its vendetta against Attorney General Jeff Sessions by characterizing its Jeff-Sessions parody character, Attorney General Waylon “Jock” Jeffcoat (Clancy Brown), as a man who “recognizes no legal or moral authority, no justice but his own” and deserves “assassination."



Liberal comedienne Michelle Wolf can’t get enough support for her White House Correspondent’s Dinner routine. In the bonus episode of David Letterman’s Netflix series, My Next Guest Needs No Introduction, he praises Wolf for having “the guts to stand up there” and “decimate the place.”



The first half of season 5 of Arrested Development took multiple swipes at President Trump, even though the show takes place before his presidency. Released on Netflix on May 29, the show inserts many of Trump’s statements made on the campaign trail into the plot.



The second season finale of CBS’s The Good Fight does not deviate from the show’s Trump obsession. With plots to assassinate the president and fictional Trump infidelity accusations, The Good Fight’s political agenda has never been clearer. The show announced its intentions early in the season with their impeachment episode, where the show claimed that the best way to impeach the president is to throw wildly false accusations at him until something sticks.



In Sunday night’s episode of Fox’s Family Guy, “Are You There God? It’s Me, Peter,” Peter Griffin meets a very vulgar God while in a coma and eventually learns that God doesn’t exist, which is unsurprising for the show created by notorious atheist Seth MacFarlane. The conversation between the two ranges from God’s non-existence to God’s statement that humans are reincarnated as other animals and humans to God’s misconduct with some angels.



Showtime’s Billions can’t decide what type of show it wants to be. Google characterizes the show, “Wealth, influence and corruption collide.” Two episodes ago, U.S. Attorney Chuck Rhoades (Paul Giamatti) colluded with corrupt hedge fund manager Bobby Axelrod (Damian Lewis) to plant evidence in an innocent man’s house and put him in jail to cover up their own involvement in a company sabotage gone wrong. Yet when it comes to President Trump, all of a sudden Billions is all about doing what’s right and “mounting the resistance."



CBS’s The Good Fight continues to push its liberal agenda unashamedly. Sunday’s episode likened President Trump’s immigration policy to the Holocaust, touted sanctuary cities, and showcased a nude photo of First Lady Melania Trump.



CBS’s left-leaning The Good Fight surprisingly questioned the validity of the #MeToo movement and the Black Lives Matter movement in its latest episode. Sunday's episode, “Day 478,” referred to both movements as starting out with good causes, but eventually turning into mobs. The episode also accused President Trump’s tax cuts of being bad for the poor.



It continues to be very clear that CBS’s The Good Fight can only be enjoyed by liberals. The constant Trump-bashing is one thing, but the show delights in portraying Republicans as evil idiots while Democrats are portrayed as America’s reasonable saviors. Sunday’s episode, “Day 464,” focuses on the allegations in the Steele Dossier that Trump acquired the services of prostitutes in a Ritz-Carlton Moscow hotel room. 



The Good Fight’s obsession with President Trump has gone from ridiculous to terrifying. Impeaching President Trump isn’t enough for the CBS All Access show. On Sunday’s episode, “Day 457,” a character makes multiple references to assassinating the president.



No show suffers from Trump Derangement Syndrome more than CBS’s The Good Fight. In addition to the episode titles, which are simply the number of days President Trump has been in office, almost every episode features a fake, absurd news segment on the President. In Sunday’s episode, “Day 450,” the Democratic National Committee interviews ten law firms with the goal of finding the best strategy to impeach Trump when the Democrats win both the House and Senate in November. The solution our righteous main characters come up with? Lie. 



Showtime’s Billions, a show that traditionally shied away from getting too political, has tossed its hat into the ring and joined the tirade of TV shows attacking the Trump administration. The third season premiere introduced Trump-appointed attorney general Waylon Jeffcoat (Clancy Brown), an evil, redneck Jeff Sessions parody who demanded that U.S. Attorney Chuck Rhoades (Paul Giamatti) refrain from prosecuting cases against Wall Street. In Sunday’s episode, “A Generation Too Late,” Jeffcoat demands that Rhoades prosecute an innocent man. As a result, Rhoades tells one of his colleagues: “We, the Maquisards, will mount the resistance. We will not let this son of a b*tch define justice for the SDNY."



Sunday’s episode of CBS’s The Good Fight presents an extreme, racist version of the person who’s supposed to be defending the conservative position. The show has made it very clear that it has its own leftist agenda to push. But along with serving as liberal propaganda, tonight’s episode, “Day 443” pretends to give an alterative, conservative viewpoint by using someone making assertions that no reasonable person would agree with.