Tom Blumer

Tom Blumer's picture
Former Contributing Editor


Tom Blumer has written for several national online publications  primarily on business, economics, politics and media bias. He has had his own blog, BizzyBlog.com, since 2005, and was with NewsBusters from December 2005 to July 2018. Along the way, he's had a decades-long career in accounting, finance, training and development.

Latest from Tom Blumer

Ali Bashar, a 20 year-old Iraqi who sought and was rejected for asylum in Germany, has been arrested after fleeing to Kurdistan, and has now reportedly admitted to raping and killing 14 year-old Susanna Feldman in Wiesbaden in May. A New York Times report posted before that reported admission, as well as Associated Press items appearing both before and after it, betray a clear reluctance to acknowledge key facts in the case, and an overriding concern that opponents of Germany's permissive migration policy might gain political traction from this horrific crime.



A highly-informed friend called me early Saturday afternoon and told me how impressed he was with Donald Trump's knowledge, temperament, and poise at the Saturday morning's press conference held just before the President was to leave for Singapore. Over at MSNBC, the guests on Saturday's AM Joy show certainly didn't view Trump's performance similarly. They relentlessly attacked Trump's mental health, physical health, and intelligence with a level of viciousness justifying questions about their mental health, physical health, and intelligence.



On Fox & Friends Thursday morning, the show's co-hosts discussed the Obama administration's deceptive attempt to allow Iran to gain access to the U.S. financial system. Its objective was enable Iran to retrieve $5.7 billion in previously frozen funds from Oman, while telling Congress and the American people that nothing of the kind would ever be permitted. 



Snopes.com's so-called "fact checks" are so often inane — NewsBusters has caught it "fact-checking" an obviously satirical post — that it's tempting to dismiss it as irrelevant. That would be a mistake. It's therefore important to call sites like Snopes out when they play their deceptive "fact check" games. That's what the site's Bethania Palma definitely did in discussing a claim about California's recently-passed water-use legislation.



On Monday, columnist James Freeman at the Wall Street Journal's "Best of the Web" noted the selective memories seen in the vast majority of the press over President Donald Trump's relatively noncommittal but nonetheless protocol-breaking tweet an hour before Friday morning's upcoming jobs report. Many of them had a serious case of the vapors, but didn't recall three instances when former President Barack Obama did the same thing during his presidency, with as much or more specificity.



Both the Associated Press and Reuters have described today's 7-2 Supreme Court ruling in Masterpiece Cake Shop v. Colorado Civil Rights Commission as "narrowly" decided and "limited." The justification for this characterization is thin, and AP has erroneously contended that "the big issue in the case, whether a business can refuse to serve gay and lesbian people," remains undecided.



There isn't enough room in a single post for all of the contempt and ridicule NBC's latest hiring move deserves. The PR department at its MSNBC cable outlet waited until early Saturday morning to tweet its announcement that Ben Rhodes, the Obama administration's Deputy National Strategic Advisor for Strategic Communications, would be joining both NBC and MSNBC as a "Political Contributor." Who knew that systematically misleading and ridiculing the press while in office in the name of selling the fatally flawed Iran nuclear "deal" would be a resumé enhancer?



In his coverage of Friday morning's stellar jobs report, the Associated Press's Chris Rugaber came up with a couple of doozies aimed at curbing readers' enthusiasm. The AP economics writer half-expected that employers would rein in their hiring over confrontational rhetoric President Donald Trump and other foreign leaders have recently engaged in over trade and tariffs. He also implausibly framed the record-low black unemployment rate of 5.9 percent merely as evidence that employers are just now finally "taking chances" with potential workers "they had previously ignored."



If the folks at the New York Times are capable of being embarrassed over their errors, the one President Donald Trump decisively exposed Friday would lead to a lot of red faces at the Old Gray Lady. Don't count on it. A week ago, the paper falsely reported that an administration spokesperson had said that holding the U.S-Korea summit in Singapore on its originally planned date of June 12 would be impossible. That spokesperson did not say that, and an audio recording proved it. Friday afternoon, Trump announced that the U.S.-Korea summit in Singapore is on — for, yes, June 12.



Friday evening, Fox News's Martha MacCallum interviewed Washington Examiner chief political correspondent Byron York. In that interview's second half, the pair discussed new information which contradicts key contentions about "How the (Trump)-Russia inquiry began" made in a December New York Times story. That story claimed that the investigation began as a result of a May 2016 "heavy drinking" meeting between low-level Donald Trump campaign foreign policy adviser George Papadopoulos and Alexander Downer, Australia's top diplomat in Great Britain.



Figures for the May ratings period show that CNN's primetime audience shrank by 25 percent from May 2017. So it seems that obsessing over Stormy Daniels, having over 147 interviews with her lawyer, constantly going after President Donald Trump as an idiot and a racist, highlighting Jim Acosta's loutish behavior, giving an open mic to gun-controllers, and siding with Hamas terrorists attacking Israeli soldiers — only a few items from a much longer list — is not a winning formula. Imagine that.



Tuesday evening (for Wednesday's print edition), New York Times reporter Julie Hirschfeld Davis, covering President Donald Trump's rally in Nashville, Tennessee, reported that it attracted "about 1,000" attendees. The Times issued a correction on Wednesday, stating that "the fire marshal’s office estimated that approximately 5,500 people attended the rally." So the crowd was 5-1/2 times larger than originally reported. How can that happen?



On Maria Bartiromo's Wednesday morning Fox Business Network show, the host asked Starbucks CEO Kevin Johnson to respond a Tuesday Washington Examiner op-ed by Alveda King, a longtime pro-life activist and niece of Martin Luther King Jr. King contended that if Starbucks is "really serious about eliminating racism," it will "stop funding" Planned Parenthood.



On Tuesday morning, UK and many international media outlets finally began reporting on the Friday arrest and imprisonment in England of anti-immigration activist and journalist Tommy Robinson. The delay of over three days in covering the story was due to out-of-control statism combined with journalistic cowardice.



In one of the more bizarre self-awareness fails ever, leftist activists and politicians have taken to Twitter to denounce conditions unaccompanied illegal-immigrant minors face at federal detention centers. They're contending that the photos involved reflect conditions existing now during President Donald Trump's administration. There's one "little" problem: The photos involved are from a 2014 Arizona Republic story, i.e., they're from the Obama era. Even an item published Friday at the Washington Post uses two of those 2014 photos. It's a fake-news feast.



Former CIA Director Michael Hayden appeared on ABC's This Week on Sunday. Hayden criticized President Donald Trump's behavior during the on-off-on North Korean negotiations, and claimed Trump is "trying to delegitimize the Mueller investigation, the FBI, (and) the Department of Justice." Host Martha Raddatz then asked about statements made in a new book and on TV this past week by former Director of National Intelligence James Clapper, who wants the public to believe that Russian influence swung the 2016 presidential election to Trump. If Raddatz expected Hayden to confirm Clapper's assessment — Why else would someone who couldn't hold back her tears on Election Night 2016 ask about it? — he forcefully disappointed her.



As expected during this era of Trump Derangement Syndrome, several media members and outlets have had a tough time maturely handling President Donald Trump's pardon of early 20th-century boxer Jack Johnson, the sport's first black heavyweight champion. Likely topping them all were the reactions of Frank Bruni of the New York Times and former Barack Obama adviser and current CNN Senior Political Commentator David Axelrod.



On his Friday Fox News show, Tucker Carlson interviewed Nick Loeb, co-producer of Roe v. Wade, a dramatic film which plans to show viewers "what happened from 1966 through 1973" that led to the Supreme Court's decision declaring existing laws against abortion unconstitutional. Carlson's interview concentrated primarily on obstacles Loeb has faced in funding the film — obstacles which have included overt and covert suppression of his efforts on Facebook. Loeb also revealed that the film will show America "how the media was manipulated" during that critical period.



UPDATE, May 27: A writer at the BreakingDefense.com website estimates that Mainland China's defense spending on a Purchasing Power Parity basis is $434.5 billion, and that its spending plus Russia's PPP spending of $157.6 billion is only about 2 percent below the USA's $606 billion.

On Friday's The Five on Fox, Juan Williams sharply criticized President Donald Trump's speech that morning at the Naval Academy's graduation ceremony. Williams condemned Trump's speech as "wrapped in patriotism ... the flag, and ... the military," and claimed that his appearance was really about co-opting the military's "high approval ratings among the American people to transfer to him." Williams's attack, though predictable, was accompanied by a significant distortion of U.S. military spending compared to the rest of the world which the remaining show panelists did not challenge.



Many in the press and on the left won't let go of their disgraceful smear of President Donald Trump after he called MS-13 gang members "animals" last week. They continue to falsely claim that he was referring to all immigrants, or to all illegal immigrants. He wasn't. But to politicial writers like the Washington Post's Philip Bump, the truth obviously doesn't matter.