Tom Blumer

Tom Blumer's picture
Contributing Editor


Tom Blumer has written for several national online publications  primarily on business, economics, politics and media bias. He has had his own blog, BizzyBlog.com, since 2005, and has been with NewsBusters since December 2005. Along the way, he's had a decades-long career in accounting, finance, training and development.

Latest from Tom Blumer

MSNBC's Stephanie Ruhle interviewed Stephen Cloobeck, "a big-time Democratic donor," on Thursday. At one point, she characterized Cloobeck, the former Chairman of Diamond resorts, as "in the middle," i.e., supposedly moderate. He sure didn't come across that way.


On Wednesday, Starbucks added itself to the long list of companies announcing moves benefiting employees while crediting the tax law passed in December. The company's strong leftist pedigree is making things awkward for the left-leaning press, which has, among other things, conveniently forgotten that just three months ago, Howard Schultz, the company's executive chairman and former CEO, slammed the Republicans' tax-cut plan as "fool's gold," claiming that corporate America "does not need" a sharp cut in its top tax rate.


The Associated Press reported early Thursday that the bill which ended the government shutdown contains Obamacare-related tax cuts, indicating that Republicans got even more of what they've wanted as a condition for ending the government shutdown. The AP's Marcy Gordon seemed quite unhappy about all of this, as she whined about a projected increase in budget deficits that isn't even a rounding error.


On Tuesday, Verizon announced that it would grant 153,000 of its 155,000 employees a bonus in the form of 50 shares of restricted stock (approximate value: $2,650), while Disney announced $1,000 bonuses for 125,000 of its cast members. Verizon also announced a significant increase in donations ($200-$300 million over the next two years) to its STEM education philanthropic effort, while Disney is "making a $50 million initial investment" (plus $25 million per year in future years) to help 88,000 employees cover college tuition costs. CNN Money's coverage of these developments still refused to fully acknowledge how unprecedentedly good the past five weeks' tax cut-driven news has been.


On Friday, the College of William & Mary announced that former FBI Director James Comey, a 1982 graduate, will "will teach a three-credit course on ethical leadership" beginning this fall. Establishment press coverage of Comey's assignment, coinciding with being named "an executive professor in education," has mostly avoided the myriad reasons why having him teach such a course is a horrible lapse in judgment by W&M.


CNN's Jim Acosta has had a rough four days. It's hard not to take some pleasure in that situation, given the Chief White House Correspondent's habitual rudeness and petulance with President Trump, and with his representatives during White House press briefings.


There is probably no better indicator that facts and the truth really don't matter to today's journalists than the fawning coverage disgraced former news anchor Dan Rather receives whenever he makes a post-CBS career move. CNN's story on Rather's latest foray into online broadcasting typifies the kid-glove treatment he has received since he was relieved of his anchor duties at CBS almost 13 years ago.


Dedicated tax-and-spend liberals often get help from the press in describing their plans to raid constituents' pocketbooks in vague terms, while nobly describing the alleged benefits of their plans to use the money. Washington's Democratic Governor Jay Inslee has the Associated Press running that kind of interference for his carbon tax.


At the Politico on Wednesday, Dan Diamond and Jennifer Haberkorn tried to portray a plan by the federal governments HHS to increase health workers' conscience protections as something vaguely sinister. In the process, they completely misstated the history of what they called "so-called conscience protections," and dishonestly whined that HHS's plan to enforce existing law is "a significant shift for the (HHS's Civil Rights) office."


Free speech, free expression, and the simple right to go about your business without being subjected to attempts at brainwashing or the equivalent of a political inquisition have been under attack for years at colleges and universities, and more recently in the workplace. Most Americans don't appreciate the seriousness of the threats because, as Tucker Carlson explained in his opening monologue on Wednesday, the press rarely covers them — and when they do, they usually side with the oppressors.


The Department of Justice announced Friday that Rene Boucher, the person who attacked and seriously injured Kentucky GOP Senator Rand Paul 2-1/2 months ago, has been charged with a federal felony and admitted to the attack. Several press accounts are crowing that the DOJ's announcement proves that the attack was not politically motivated. It does no such thing.


New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio played make-believe during his Wednesday Morning Joe appearance, and everyone else present let him do so without challenge. Hizzoner's deepest dive into fantasyland was his contention that he can raise the money needed to repair and improve Gotham's decrepit subway system by "taxing millionaires and billionaires," which would only raise about 5 percent of the money needed.


The Daily Caller's Eric Lieberman reported early Friday afternoon that Google is discontinuing (for now) its "fact-check" feature. The company is now characterizing the effort, which the Daily Caller exposed as a thinly veiled attempt to target conservative sites while leaving leftists alone, as an "experiment" which has been put "on hold," while the its engineers see, in Lieberman's words, "how they can vastly improve a fact-check system."


On Monday, Valerie Richardson at the Washington Times noted that no teams with players who continued to kneel during the National Anthem before National Football League games until the end of the regular season qualified for the playoffs. A sports psychologist sees a potentially important lesson in this result, while NBC, which has promised to showcase kneeling players during the Anthem before the beginning of this year's Super Bowl, may be destined for disappointment.


The Dow Jones Industrial Average closed above 26,000 for the first time on Wednesday. When it first jumped the 26,000 hurdle during Tuesday's trading, only to fall back at the close, CNN's Christine Romans somewhat surprisingly noted it. But as she did, she positively and erroneously spun the market's awful pre-presidential election history in a way that even some conservatives have ignorantly come to accept.


Reporters continue to concoct reasons to complain as more than 2 million American individuals and their families have suddenly become better off than they were three weeks ago. Even the news that the nation's largest retailer is raising its nationwide minimum wage while paying bonuses of up to $1,000 to every employee, and that an automaker is investing $1 billion in U.S. production, haven't moved cynics who refuse to concede the unconditional positivity in all of this.


In a January 8 New York Times column, novelist and self-proclaimed dog lover Jennifer Weiner (rhymes with "diner") showed that she has problems with the Trump family not owning a dog. In the process, she lied like one about Trump's attitude towards the family pets of Vice President Mike Pence, and repeated the lie on Saturday when she appeared on Michael Smerconish's CNN show.


One reason a coherent debate about immigration is almost impossible in this country is that the press fails to honestly and accurately report even the most basic facts. A Saturday Associated Press report on the topic by Nicholas Riccardi exemplifies this consistent failure.


It takes a special talent to spin news which is unquestionably positive into something negative. But Christopher Rugaber and Josh Boak at the Associated Press were up to the task in a Wednesday afternoon report on bonuses, pay raises, and other benefits which now have been showered on well over 2 million American workers since the December passage of federal tax cuts.


The City of Seattle probably didn't expect pushback from Costco, seen by many on the left as retail's "anti-Walmart," after its "sugary drink" tax of 1.75 cents per ounce went into effect January 1. But that is exactly what has happened. In moves the national press, which largely supports such taxes, has thus far ignored, Costco is itemizing the built-in cost of the tax on its Seattle store's shelf tags, and informing customers that they won't pay the tax if they shop at one of two other Costco stores outside Seattle's city limits.