Tom Blumer

Tom Blumer's picture
Contributing Editor


Tom Blumer has written for several national online publications  primarily on business, economics, politics and media bias. He has had his own blog, BizzyBlog.com, since 2005, and has been with NewsBusters since December 2005. Along the way, he's had a decades-long career in accounting, finance, training and development.

Latest from Tom Blumer

On Monday, shortly after President Trump asked two employees at a suburban Cincinnati manufacturer to describe their plans for the $1,000 bonuses they had received, MSNBC's Katy Tur ridiculed them on Twitter. Tur considered $1,000 a pittance, and contended that the bonus money wouldn't genuinely help the employees involved achieve their stated goals. On Wednesday, Tur responded poorly to the outrage over her condescension by trying to change the subject.


At the Cincinnati Enquirer on Monday, reporter Jessie Balmert "fact-checked" President Donald Trump's afternoon speech at a suburban manufacturer. Balmert is the Enquirer reporter who in mid-2016 told readers that there were 220,000 U.S. murders in 2015 (actual number: 15,192). As would be expected, her Monday "fact check" was riddled with obvious errors and distortions.


During his speech Monday in Blue Ash, Ohio, a Cincinnati suburb, President Donald Trump invited two Sheffer Corporation employees to share their plans for the extra money they are receiving because of December's tax law. Minutes later, demonstrating how utterly out of touch she is with working families, MSNBC's Katy Tur posted two error-filled, condescending tweets mocking their plans.


The Philadelphia Eagles took the field before Sunday's Super Bowl kickoff to the "tune" of "Dreams and Nightmares" by rapper Meek Mill. The cowardly sports press has avoided criticizing the team and its players for their horrible de facto endorsement of Mill and their objections to his alleged persecution.


On Friday, TheFederalist.com's John Daniel Davidson described the deeply politicized Steele dossier-related actions of the Obama administration and its still-present apparatchiks. Concerning a separate politics-driven attack, Davidson noted that "Obama’s Justice Department failed" at the Supreme Court in 2016 to compel the Little Sisters of the Poor to fund abortifacient drugs. That's true, but attempts to force the Sisters into compliance have not ended.


On Saturday's Fox & Friends, syndicated columnist and investigative reporter Michelle Malkin sharply criticized the establishment press's sharp U-turn on law-enforcement transparency from George W. Bush's presidency. She in effect observed that one of the key reasons for the current "stonewall media" environment is self-protection.


Shortly after the Nunes memo's Friday release, five reporters — three at the Associated Press and one each at MSNBC and CNN, pushed the long-discredited claim that, in the AP's words, "(Christopher) Steele’s opposition research effort was initially funded by the conservative Washington Free Beacon."


Wednesday afternoon, the Tennessean reported that Nashville Mayor Megan Barry disclosed that "she had an extramarital affair with the police officer in charge of her security detail." The paper's story tagged Barry as a Democrat (in their fourth paragraph), but national stories seen at the Associated Press and ABC News have not.


In a breathtaking, unhinged display apparently triggered by President Donald Trump's well-received State of the Union address, Counterpunch Editor Jeffrey St. Clair outrageously mocked invited guest, double amputee, and North Korean defector Ji Seong-ho as "Korea's version of Tiny Tim who brought his own crutches."


Those who linger at the The New Yorker magazine's website eventually see a splash advertising its dedication to "fighting fake stories with real ones." Staff writer John Cassidy's ridiculous assertion that "George Soros Upstaged Donald Trump at Davos" shows that this is clearly false advertising.


At the New York Times, Wednesday's print edition version of Adam Goldman's and Matt Apuzzo's story on Deputy Director Andrew McCabe's departure from the FBI claims he "abruptly stepped down ... after months of withering criticism from President Trump ... (and) pressure from the head of the bureau ..." That isn't where the Times started when news of McCabe's departure first broke Tuesday. None of the story's original or six subsequent iterations seen at NewDiffs.org mention the "insurance policy" controversy which has tarnished McCabe's tenure.


There's a war on plastic straws. Its proponents are demanding that restaurants not offer them unless requested, with criminal penalties for violations. Some jurisdictions have enacted outright bans. The basis for the movement is research done in 2011 by Milo Cress, then 9 years old. Seriously.


On January 11, Nancy Pelosi slammed as "crumbs" the wage increases and bonuses well over 100 companies had announced at that point after the new tax law's passage in December. Thursday, she went to the same well more stridently. The establishment press, including the Associated Press, still won't report Pelosi's and others' similar comments, because they know how toxic they are.


Mayor Joy Cooper of Hallandale Beach, Florida, was forced to resign by Sunshine State Governor Rick Scott on Friday after her Thursday arrest on three felony charges: campaign finance violations, official misconduct and money laundering. At least four Florida news outlets have run reports failing to tag Cooper, who is accused of accepted illegal campaign finance checks from Russians, as a Democrat.


On Thursday, USA Today headlined the possibility, with an accompanying video, that President Donald Trump might "be giving a speech to a empty room in Davos" on Friday. It didn't work out that way.


Friday, Fox Business's Maria Bartiromo interviewed Philip Jennings, General Secretary of the UNI Global Union, as he took a break from supposedly helping the downtrodden by attending the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland. Jennings whined that unions can't organize in America because of government and employer obstruction, and brought the host to a boil when he falsely claimed that 62 percent of the benefits of December's tax-cut legislation go to the top 1 percent.


Wisconsin Republican Governor Scott Walker gave his annual State of the State speech Wednesday. Naturally, Scott Bauer at the Associated Press, who has been on a seemingly singular mission to dispute and distort Walker's statements and actions during the Governor's seven years in office, treated absolutely true statements Walker made during that speech as somehow untruthful in a Thursday "Fact Check."


Twitter's #ReleaseTheMemo hashtag, referring to the four-page memo which allegedly contains evidence of extensive "abuse in ... surveillance practices" at the FBI and Department of Justice, has gotten on Beltway Democrats' nerves. An attempt to pass off Americans' interest in having it released as a campaign led by Russian bots appears to have blown up in their faces, because two of their leaders believed a bogus report from the far-left media fever swamp.


MSNBC's Stephanie Ruhle interviewed Stephen Cloobeck, "a big-time Democratic donor," on Thursday. At one point, she characterized Cloobeck, the former Chairman of Diamond resorts, as "in the middle," i.e., supposedly moderate. He sure didn't come across that way.


On Wednesday, Starbucks added itself to the long list of companies announcing moves benefiting employees while crediting the tax law passed in December. The company's strong leftist pedigree is making things awkward for the left-leaning press, which has, among other things, conveniently forgotten that just three months ago, Howard Schultz, the company's executive chairman and former CEO, slammed the Republicans' tax-cut plan as "fool's gold," claiming that corporate America "does not need" a sharp cut in its top tax rate.