Tom Blumer

Tom Blumer's picture
Contributing Editor


Tom Blumer has written for several national online publications  primarily on business, economics, politics and media bias. He has had his own blog, BizzyBlog.com, since 2005, and has been with NewsBusters since December 2005. Along the way, he's had a decades-long career in accounting, finance, training and development.

Latest from Tom Blumer

A peer-reviewed research report published last week by three highly qualified researchers with the agreement of seven others similarly accomplished charges that the entities reporting historical and current worldwide temperatures have adjusted their data to show global warming which has not actually occurred. The trio has concluded that this data is "not a valid representation of reality," and that as a result, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's 2009 "Endangerment Finding" — essentially that global warming has been occurring and continues to accelerate due to human activity — is, in the study's words, "invalidated." The establishment media's silence has been deafening.


If there's ever a "most pathetic correction ever" contest, the one posted by the Associated Press late Friday afternoon, conveniently ahead of what for many Americans will be a very long holiday weekend, has to be a serious contender. The wire service won't even acknowledge that it's a correction at its APnews.com site, instead calling it a "clarification." No one should be fooled. The AP's folly appears to have been triggered by an appropriately labeled correction posted at the New York Times Thursday evening which, as Kristine Marsh at NewsBusters noted Friday morning, "admitted (that) one of the media’s major talking points about the (government's) Russia investigation wasn’t actually true."


Seth Borenstein at the Associated Press and those pushing for radical wealth redistribution in the name of "climate change" just can't past their hysteria over President Donald Trump's unilateral decision to withdraw from the Paris Climate Accords. Trump's move reversed former President Barack Obama's unilateral decision to sign on. Borenstein's latest exercise in hyperbole on Thursday gave free publicity to a study which absurdly pretends to project the economic impact of alleged global warming over 80 years out. The study's authors appear not to realize that the allegedly frightening impacts they're projecting aren't intimidating at all.


One of the more annoying aspects of establishment press news coverage is how willing so many journalists are to accept obviously bogus statistics. One recent example was seen on June 20 at the Washington Post. At its Wonkblog, Christopher Ingraham (and presumably his editors) blindly accepted a statistic on children's exposure to violence which anyone in touch with the real world should have recognized as obviously wrong, namely that 1 out of 24 children "witnessed a shooting" in the past year.


On Tuesday, in a segment which could easily have been mistaken for parody, MSNBC's Ali Veshi relayed Planned Parenthood's long-discredited and tortured statistic that abortions constitute only three percent of its "services." As he did this, Veshi absurdly disclaimed association with this and other fundamentally dishonest claims by the group, saying "I don’t have enough knowledge" to evaluate them, and that he's "not advocating for Planned Parenthood."


The latest episode in the Trump administration's long-running legal battle to impose a temporary ban on travel from several nations concluded on Monday. Its result, as described by National Review's David French, was that "in a per curiam ruling, the Supreme Court restored the vast majority of the Trump administration’s temporary travel ban — including the temporary ban on refugee entry." Much of the establishment press is nevertheless describing this major Trump administration legal victory as "partial" and "limited." Most reports are also failing to note that the ruling was unanimous.


On Thursday evening, CNN.com ran a story by reporter Thomas Frank which, according to a now-posted Editor's Note, connected "Anthony Scaramucci with (congressional) investigations into the Russian Direct Investment Fund." The Editor's Note tells the network's readers: "That story did not meet CNN's editorial standards and has been retracted." Further, "Links to the story have been disabled. CNN apologizes to Mr. Scaramucci." Then, in a Monday evening bombshell, Fox News's Howard Kurtz reported that "Three journalists (have) quit CNN in fallout from (the) retracted Russia story" — although it's possible they may have resigned instead of getting fired. What in the world happened?


Until I read Wednesday evening's dispatch from the Associated Press by Deb Riechmann and Richard Lardner, I had no idea that the secretaries of state and boards of election throughout the land had surrendered their roles in compiling election results to the Associated Press. Now I know better. In a report which primarily concerned former Homeland Security Secretary Jeh Johnson's appearance earlier that day before the House Intelligence Committee, the AP buried news that the Democratic National Committee had refused DHS's help after its systems were allegedly hacked, but also told readers that prior to Election Day, Johnson "contacted The Associated Press, which counts votes."


With so much attention focused on the meaning of the results of Sixth District Congressional special election in Georgia, the establishment press has not looked into what happened to pre-election polls which showed Democrat Jon Ossoff ahead of Republican Karen Handel by as many as seven points less than two weeks before Tuesday's election. Though it may partially have been yet another in a long series of Democrat-driven polling failures intended to drive down Republican turnout, the plausible idea that the shooting of Congressman Steve Scalise the previous week and the ongoing campaign of violent rhetoric from the left had an impact is not getting the attention one would expect.


It only took four sentences for Bill Barrow and Kathleen Foody at the Associated Press to serve up a howler in their attempt to minimize the national significance of Republican Karen Handel's victory over Democrat Jon Ossoff in Tuesday evening's Sixth District congressional election in Georgia. Their report's fourth sentence claimed that the winner's victory speech "thank you to Trump was Handel's most public show of support of the man who wasn't embraced by many voters in the well-educated suburban Atlanta district in November." That's utter nonsense, as the AP pair essentially admitted two times much later in their dispatch.


Otto Warmbier, the 22-year-old student from Wyoming, Ohio and the University of Virginia who was returned to his family in a coma last week after being imprisoned in North Korea for over a year, died on Monday. Tuesday morning, the Associated Press and "experts" it consulted somehow found the communist nation's treatment of Warmbier "one of the more perplexing and heart-rending developments in North Korea's long, antagonistic standoff with its neighbors and Washington." A reading of AP's "analysis" indicates that it's fair to claim that restrictions North Korea has placed on the wire service in return for its presence there have pervasively affected the credibility of all of its reporting from and even about that country.


Saturday evening, Eric Tucker and Erica Werner at the Associated Press were clearly determined to tell readers as little as they possibly could about the list of GOP lawmakers' names found on James Hodgkinson after he was killed trying to assassinate several congressmen and others present at a baseball practice in Alexandria, Virginia on Wednesday. In doing so, the AP pair failed to disclose details already reported by several media outlets.


Thursday evening, CBS's Scott Pelley, who officially ended his tenure as the network's Evening News anchor the following evening, told viewers that "It's time to ask whether the attack on the United States Congress Wednesday was foreseeable, predictable and, to some degree, self-inflicted." It's clear from Pelley's subsequent commentary that his answers to all three elements are "Yes." It's equally clear from the examples he supplied as support that he sees (or wants viewers to see) the problem as predominantly about the conduct of those on the right.


As the Media Research Center's Brent Bozell noted Thursday morning, a Wednesday evening New York Times editorial which made it into Thursday's print edition outrageously perpetuated "a long-debunked leftist conspiracy theory about Gov. Sarah Palin inciting the (2011 Gabby) Giffords shooting," even though the paper's "own news reporters declared just yesterday that there was no evidence linking Palin to." The Times issued corrections which would have led its readers to believe that all mention of the 2011 Palin-targeting myth had been excised. That's not what happened.


HuffPost — previously known as the Huffington Post, the far-left entity whose cashed-out original owners made themselves millionaires on the backs of thousands of unpaid bloggers — "laid off 39 staffers on Wednesday, a move that follows parent company AOL's acquisition by telecom giant Verizon." On Thursday, Sam Stein, the website's senior politics editor, demonstrated such tone-deafness that one has to wonder how he escaped being among those who were let go.


On Tuesday, Time Inc. announced yet another in a long series of corporate downsizings. Wednesday evening, a horrid post by Time.com reporters Melissa Chan and Jennifer Calfas on "What to Know About Suspected Virginia Shooter James Hodgkinson" illustrated why the parent company is and deserves to be a continually shrinking enterprise.


There are people who appear to live in hermetically sealed bubbles, and then there's Chris Cillizza, formerly of the Washington Post but now at CNN. On the apparently safe assumption that he really thought President Donald Trump and the public would have a hard time coming up with answers, Cillizza challenged the Commander in Chief and, and in effect the Twitterverse, to "name a (news) story that is 'fake' or 'incorrect.'" A tidal wave of specific responses arrived in short order.


Late last week, the Associated Press attempted to troll President Donald Trump by claiming that his decision to withdraw from the Paris Climate Accord "may speed up" damage to his organizations' properties in Florida and other low-lying areas because of a "climate change"-driven acceleration in rising sea levels — by 2100. At the Weather Channel's Weather.com Friday evening, writer Pam Wright seemed to relish that prospect, and presented it as if it's far more than a possibility.


Washington Post media columnist Margaret Sullivan was almost beside herself with glee Saturday afternoon. Sullivan apparently believes that because a bunch of establishment press outlets which have relentlessly attacked President Donald Trump for nearly two years predictably called him a liar in the wake of James Comey's testimony meant that he had "another terrible, horrible, no good, very bad day." Though it numbered only nine, a CNN focus group panel in Fairfield, Ohio strongly begged to differ, appearing to surprise network reporter Gary Tuchman.


Two large corporations have withdrawn as sponsors of "Free Shakespeare in the Park" in New York City because of the theater group's presentation of a modernized version of Julius Caesar where a man who is clearly a stand-in for Donald Trump gets assassinated. Given the play's offensive content, a very pertinent question to ask would be: "When will Time Warner, the parent company of CNN, which at least pretends to be an objective news organization, pull its sponsorship?"