Tom Blumer

Tom Blumer's picture
Contributing Editor


Tom Blumer has written for several national online publications  primarily on business, economics, politics and media bias. He has had his own blog, BizzyBlog.com, since 2005, and has been with NewsBusters since December 2005. Along the way, he's had a decades-long career in accounting, finance, training and development.

Latest from Tom Blumer

At Politico, consistency has never been a strong point. Somehow, the just-signed tax law supposedly won't have that much of an effect on Americans' economic behavior, but there's no doubt that the bill's tiny cuts in taxes on alcoholic beverages will bring about disastrous results.


On Christmas Day, perhaps to minimize its exposure, the Associated Press published its top ten sports stories of the year. Readers will not be at all surprised that "NFL players kneeling during the national anthem" as a result of President Donald Trump's "feud with the NFL" was "the runaway winner ... in balloting by AP members and editors." Predictably, the AP didn't mention the lower attendance and lower TV ratings which have resulted from the players' ill-advised protests.


Early Saturday evening Eastern Time, CNN International Senior Correspondent Arwa Damon, opening a CNN-US panel discussion on the anti-government protests in Iran, read the Iranian government's reactions to Donald Trump's Saturday tweets which quoted and replayed related portions of the President's September speech at the United Nations. Damon followed that statement with a stunning example of the gratuitous America-bashing we've become so used to seeing at CNN, as she broadened the topic to "how frustrated other countries are with the United States," claiming that "a lot of nations and their populations" see the U.S. as "not having a moral leg to stand on."


NBC News has given us yet another fake establishment press story to cap off a year of media sloppiness unlike any other. On Friday, the network breathlessly tweeted out a copy of a search warrant "made public today," directed at "an e-mail address associated with Trump surrogate and former Milwaukee County Sheriff David A. Clarke Jr." That the warrant itself was dated March 7 apparently didn't curb NBC's enthusiasm.


In an unbylined 11:31 a.m. Eastern Time dispatch Saturday, the Associated Press demonstrated why anyone trying to get to the truth about the status of the Hillary Clinton's private server-scandal — which is clearly not over, and clearly has not been "litigated a million times," as CNN's desperate Don Lemon claimed on Thursday in shouting down a conservative panelist — needs to go somewhere else to find it.


New York Times "Your Money" scribe Ron Lieber seemed blissfully unaware that the suggestions he made and the language he used in his Friday column on how individuals and families might use their savings from the just-signed tax bill mirrors what President Donald Trump, Republicans, and conservatives have been saying for years.


At CNN, it's not unusual to see one conservative or center-right guest in a panel discussion stacked with leftists, including the host. That's bad enough, but there has clearly been an increase in the number of times the lone conservative or center-right guest also ends up on the receiving end of rude, abusive treatment one would never see directed at other panelists. Such was the case Thursday evening, when conservative talk radio host and CNN political commentator Ben Ferguson was shouted down and cut off by host Don Lemon.


This one's for the "They can't possibly believe what they're writing" file. Thursday morning, Ben White and Nancy Cook at Politico actually claimed that President Donald Trump is building "his 2018 political message by rebranding" predecessor Barack Obama's "economic legacy."


Charges that the Obama administration's FBI and Justice Department may have actively worked to prevent Donald Trump's election have really gotten under CNN's thin skin. On Wednesday, the network took out its frustrations on Ohio Republican Congressman Jim Jordan, both in John Berman's hostile interview and in the one-sided panel discussion which followed.


Early Thursday afternoon, Brad Wilmouth at NewsBusters posted on clueless Alisyn Camerota's morning interview of New York Governor Andrew Cuomo on CNN. After Cuomo whined about the new federal tax law's $10,000 limitation — not an "elimination," as he falsely claimed — on state and local tax deductibility, he contended that New York and California are the nation's "economic engines." There is some truth in that, but how long can that continue if so many productive people continue to leave those two states?


On Sunday's episode of Meet the Press, as he introduced a discussion about the establishment media's reputation at the end of 2017, it seemed that host Chuck Todd did not expect two of his panelists to try to pretend that the press's execrable year was actually one during which its reputation went "way up." But that's what Hal Boedeker, the Orlando Sentinel's "TV Guy," believes, as did NBC's own Claire Atkinson, who cited online subscription growth as her "evidence." Their statements constitute the comedy gold of cluelessness.


On Sunday's This Week show on ABC, host Jonathan Karl and Bloomberg News's Margaret Talev displayed stunning historical naivete in characterizing the tax cuts for individuals in the tax law signed several days ago by President Trump as "temporary."


Up until the moment it was signed into law, many press reports on the tax law portrayed it or strongly implied that it contained increases or virtually nothing for most taxpayers while granting big breaks to "wealthy" households (the term preferred over the genuinely accurate "high-income" label). So imagine how surprised some Americans must be to learn that the press is having a very difficult time finding actual examples of individuals and families — both theoretical and in real life — whose taxes will go up.


Who knew that two words could drive the people at CNN this crazy? At the network which has exemplified fake news since Donald Trump's election in 2016, the "resistance" to Trump's preference for saying "Merry Christmas" during this time of year has led network talking heads to repeated denials that there ever has been a war on Christmas, while at the same time trying to open new fronts in that war. We should rename this outfit GNN — the Grinch News Network.


The Associated Press's failure to report Gloria Steinem’s early-December howler about how Donald Trump supposedly "lost" the 2016 presidential election "by 10 million votes" which I noted in a December 10 NewsBusters post is consistent with the press’s history of preventing leftists' most provocative and controversial statements from becoming widely known. The press considers Steinem a feminist “icon,” and thus especially worthy of protection. In preparing that post, I discovered that the New York Times appears to have taken their protection of Steinem to an unusual level.


On Sunday morning, Thomas Beaumont and Nicholas Riccardi at the Associated Press did all they could to convince readers that the tax bill just passed by Congress and signed by Donald Trump isn't seen as a big deal and has no genuine enthusiastic support (even though they found some) among those who voted for him in 2016. They predictably claimed that the law bestows "its richest benefits on companies and wealthy individuals,' and employed a classic statistical deception to support that false contention.


Anyone who has been out in the real world during current and previous Christmas shopping seasons knows that there has been an informal (and occasionally formal) proscription against stores wishing customers a "Merry Christmas" and promoting Christmas in their ads and promotions. On Friday, Wolf Blitzer's CNN panel tried to pretend that the hostility towards "Merry Christmas" has never existed, as they mocked a video which exaggerated its thanks to President Donald Trump for "allowing us to say merry Christmas."


During the past month, many establishment press pundits have pivoted from believing that Republicans will suffer major losses in the 2018 midterm elections because they haven't accomplished anything to predicting that Republicans will suffer major losses now that they have. They're now saying that the just-signed tax law, which they have declared is and will remain deeply unpopular (if so, that will be thanks mostly to their beat reporters' dishonest coverage), likely causing the GOP to lose a large number of seats, just as ObamaCare's passage led to serious Democratic Party losses in 2010. These attempts to draw a parallel fail for one obvious reason: ObamaCare's effective date was deliberately delayed for almost four years, while the just-signed tax law has gone into effect immediately.


On Thursday, Vivian Yee at the New York Times repeated the tired and unproven claim that "a large body of research has suggested that immigrants are no more likely, and often less likely, to commit serious crimes than native-born Americans." Though the article had plenty of links, there was no link to anything in that alleged "large body of research." Though Donald Trump has ordered his administration to change the situation, the fact is that there is not yet enough data to prove or disprove Yee's breezy contention, and the limited sliver of data available about federal crimes indicates that non-citizens disproportionately commit crimes.


On Tuesday, Maine Republican Senator Susan Collins bitterly attacked the press's coverage of her decision to vote for the GOP's tax bill. Though Collins didn't name a media outlet in her criticism, the New York Times has been the primary purveyor of now-popular leftist memes, which Collins characterized as "unbelievably sexist," that she was "duped" by party leadership, and that she was so hard-hearted that she wasn't "brought to tears" by protesting Mainers who met with her last week.