Tom Blumer

Tom Blumer's picture
Contributing Editor


Tom Blumer has written for several national online publications  primarily on business, economics, politics and media bias. He has had his own blog, BizzyBlog.com, since 2005, and has been with NewsBusters since December 2005. Along the way, he's had a decades-long career in accounting, finance, training and development.

Latest from Tom Blumer

On Tuesday, David Roberts at the hopelessly left-biased Vox.com promoted a decidedly negative form of supply-side economics, namely "policies that choke off fossil fuels at their origin." He, and the authors of a paper he referenced which advocates "restrictive supply-side climate policies," act as if this is something new, when governments and sometimes violent envirozealots have long engaged in these activities.



The Boston Globe's Ty Burr reviewed Chappaquiddick Tuesday, admonishing readers that the movie "might even be accurate." Burr claims that "I'll never know" what really happened the night Ted Kennedy drove off Chappaquiddick Island's Dike Road bridge and left Mary Jo Kopechne to die in his submerged car, "and neither will you." Besides, he insists, though Ted was "flawed but human," he had "endless accomplishments in the Senate."



In early March, Tim Graham at NewsBusters noted that CNN's February audience fell by 19 percent from February 2017. Full first-quarter cable TV ratings released this week show serious year-over-year declines not only at CNN, but also at ESPN, which has continued to push politically correct causes. Perhaps CNN's Jeffrey Tucker should consider the shortcomings in his network's programming instead of immaturely tagging Fox News, which remained in first place by a significant margin, as "state-run TV."



On Sunday's MSNBC Live with Alex Witt, after panelist Jennifer Grossman invoked Martin Luther King's historic "content of their character" statement, TV One's Roland Martin, in a demanding tone, requested a "favor": "Please don’t quote Dr. King." Apparently in Martin's world, only a black person like him can quote King, while a white person like Grossman can't. To her credit, Grossman pushed back hard: "I will quote Dr. Martin Luther king every single day and you won’t stop me."



As Scott Whitlock noted Tuesday afternoon, CNN's perpetually aggrieved Jim Acosta was at it again, hinting at a conspiracy behind a lost broadcast connection: "I won’t read into why we lost connection just a few moments ago." Acosta's Tuesday whining shouldn't cause us to forget or ignore what he did on Monday, when he set a new low for journalistic rudeness by shouting questions at President Donald Trump during the White House Easter egg roll.



Tuesday, the Washington Post, whose motto since February 2017 has been "Democracy Dies in Darkness," gave precious access to a supporter of Xi Jinping's consolidation of power in mainland China. "Shanghai venture capitalist" Eric X. Li also taunted the West, claiming that "liberal democracy in its current state seems incapable of producing a leader half as good."



Early on March 29, the Original Series Twitter account at CNN, the network which has obsessed over President Donald Trump's mid-2000s alleged affairs with Stormy Daniels and Karen McDougal, posted this tweet about President John F. Kennedy: "JFK had a legendary love life. Did one of his affairs connect him with the mob?" The tweet remained up for over four days, but was pulled after its presence was noticed Monday morning by FoxNews.com, and in turn by Matt Drudge.



On Saturday's Fox & Friends, Geraldo Rivera contended that the Gaza strip is "the world's largest concentration camp." Thousands of Palestinians have recently massed along the Gaza border with Israel during a month-long protest. Fifteen have died in violent clashes with Israeli forces guarding the border. When show co-host Pete Hegseth reminded Rivera that Gaza is run by Hamas, a terrorist organization which has never recognized Israel's right to exist, Rivera deflected, saying "I'm not even going to argue it."



A Democratic House member has, by her own admission, failed to protect female staff members who said they were harassed and treated violently by her former chief of staff. Rep. Elizabeth Esty has also admitted that she gave the chief of staff a $5,000 payoff when he left, along with a favorable job recommendation. In her Friday evening report on the situation, the Associated Press's Susan Haigh played defense — for Esty, describing her as "an outspoken advocate for the #MeToo movement" who is now in an "awkward position." Haigh also tried to help her salvage her political career by describing her outreach to groups involved with "issues affecting women" when she knew the news was about to go public.



NPR reporter Vanessa Romo embarrassed the taxpayer-funded network on Good Friday. In a breaking-news article online on the controversy over a journalist's claim that Pope Francis denied the existence of Hell,  Romo described Easter as "the day celebrating the idea that Jesus did not die and go to hell or purgatory or anywhere at all, but rather arose into heaven." Good grief.



On March 21, The National Sheriffs Association released a letter signed by 380 of its members demanding that Congress pass legislation "tightening border security" and "support(ing) the replacement and upgrades to current barriers and fencing and construction of barriers along the U.S. and Mexico international boundary." The press has virtually ignored this effort.



On Thursday, shortly after Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced that he would not appoint a second special counsel, CNN's Jeffrey Toobin agreed with the decision, claiming that "as far as I could tell, most of the accusations against the FBI are lunatic conspiracy theories." That would lead one to question why Toobin didn't complain about having an inspector general and federal prosecutor John Huber look into these matters. The fact is that there is enough evidence of a conspiracy and coverup to justify some form of inquiry — and Toobin, in his heart of hearts, should know that.



The Boston Globe has published at least three reports about Bryon Hefner, the husband of now-former Massachusetts State Senate President Stanley Rosenberg, culminating today in coverage of Hefner's indictment on "multiple charges of sexual assault, criminal lewdness, and distributing nude photographs without consent." None of the stories reviewed directly tagged Rosenberg as a Democrat.



The Trump presidency has driven many leftists to expose their true beliefs — radical, loony, or both. Cathy Areu was quite a bit of both in her appearance on Tucker Carlson's Fox News show Thursday evening, as she advocated non-citizen voting, "contributing" foreigners voting and resident foreign diplomats voting, and even cross-U.S. state voting.



In June 1994, a Time Magazine cover photo of O.J. Simpson after his arrest generated heated controversy because his photo had been significantly darkened. The magazine's latest issue treats Jeff Sessions similarly, even though the Trump administration's Attorney General hasn't been accused of murdering anybody or credibly accused of any crime.



On Monday, University of Utah Professors Paul G. Cassell and Richard Fowles published a study primarily blaming the 58 percent murder spike in the City of Chicago in 2016 — to 754 from 480 in 2015 — on a steep decline in police "stop and frisks." The 2016 "stop and frisk" decline occurred because of an agreement the City made with the American Civil Liberties Union designed, according to the Chicago Tribune, "to curb racial profiling and other unconstitutional practices." 



In Asheville, North Carolina, the Gannett-affiliated Citizen Times gave wall-to-wall coverage to the city's version of Saturday's March For Our Lives. Somehow, though, the paper didn't find the time or energy for almost three weeks to report a March 7 comment by a Democratic candidate for county sheriff who told a Michael Bloomberg-funded "Moms Demand Action" group that prying guns out of owners' "cold dead hands" would be "okay." Finally, the paper noted the controversy on Tuesday — and came down on R. Daryl Fisher's side.



On Thursday, both online and on MSNBC, NBC News unskeptically relayed bogus claims by the liberal Center for American Progress that the House Intelligence Committee's decision to end its Trump-Russia collusion investigation was negligently premature.



Both in its related tweet and the story's headline, CNN has promoted Sandra Gonzalez's Tuesday column about the movie Chappaquiddick as being about "one of Sen. Ted Kennedy's darkest hours." This begs two questions: "Wasn't Chappaquiddick far worse for Mary Jo Kopechne?" and "Did Ted Kennedy have other darker hours?"



On Sunday, CNN's Reliable Sources host Brian Stelter spoke with Marjory Stoneman Douglas school newspaper co-editor Rebecca Schneid. When asked if she sees "a difference right now between journalism and activism and what you're doing," Schneid responded that "in its own right journalism is a form of activism." In a telling Twitter follow-up, Los Angeles Times reporter Matt Pearce, who should know better, showed that he doesn't see a difference, and is shamelessly proud of it.