For-profit health insurance and government medical care mean one thing for patients: what
was once ‘basic and ordinary’ is increasingly regulated, rationed, and often denied to those who
need it most.



Sunday night’s episode of Lifetime’s Mary Kills People, “Raised by Wolves,” continued to praise Mary for her lethal mission despite her and her partner’s doubts. The episode also revealed that Mary helped her mother commit suicide when she was only 16. In the wake of her ongoing investigation for murder, Mary (Caroline Dhavernas) visits her sister and tells her about her side job. When her sister, Nicole, looks reasonably shocked, Mary explains, “These people need me okay? No one else will help them. I’m a doctor and it’s medicine.” Of course, Nicole quickly comes around to seeing the apparent good in the service Mary provides.



Sunday night’s episode of Lifetime’s Mary Kills People, “Wave the White Flag,” championed the cause for passive euthanasia (withdrawing medical treatment with the intention of causing the patient’s death) with both a Bible verse and statements by the police officer investigating Mary for murder. After a man is placed on life support, Mary (Caroline Dhavernas) advises his significant other, Sonia, on how to proceed regarding the next step. Although the doctors can still do more to save the man’s life, Sonia worries about his earlier wishes not to “breathe through a tube or something.” Mary offers a statement said to her earlier by an elderly woman whose life she was ending: “There's beauty in the inevitable.” Although his death isn’t inevitable, as there are other surgical options, Sonia equates Mary’s advice to a bible verse to justify letting him die.



Reminiscent of Scandal’s 2015 winter finale episode, which showed an abortion set to the song “Silent Night,” the second episode of Lifetime’s Mary Kills People, “The River Styx,” had Mary end someone’s life to Sarah McLachlan’s “Full of Grace.” On Sunday night’s episode, the 15-year-old son of a woman suffering from ALS holds life-ending “nurse” Mary Harris’s (Caroline Dhavernas) partner, Des (Richard Short) at gunpoint. The son, Charlie, demands that Des and Mary kill his sick mother. When Mary finally shows up to deliver the life-ending drug, Charlie plays his mom’s favorite song, “Full of Grace,” while Mary injects her. 



In the wake of pro-assisted-suicide films like Me Before You and the media’s applauding of Brittany Maynard’s choice to die, Lifetime’s new euthanasia drama, Mary Kills People, is the latest show to champion the cause of assisted suicide. The first episode, reasonably titled “Bloody Mary,” premiered Sunday night and began with Mary Harris (Caroline Dhavernas) and partner Des (Richard Short) giving a man his life-taking drug in a glass of champagne. When the man hesitates, Mary calms him down by comparing the fear of death to the fear of flying in an airplane. .



Friday night’s episode of CBS’s Blue Bloods, “Love Lost,” took a turn for the worse in promoting assisted suicide, but also showed the true dedication officers have for everyone in their communities, regardless of race.



The media is at it again trying to make news instead of reporting it concerning DC’s Assisted Suicide bill. The media has played cozy with the pro-suicide crowd in framing the argument to their liking, namely that only religious people are opposed to assisted suicide and only because they want to impose their values. They also have taken what has been and should be a bipartisan issue and making it polarizing. The reasons that one should oppose suicide and assisting a suicide are universal in that they harm people of all ideologies equally.

 



To follow-up on the adulterous priest (which still continues by the way), Friday night’s episode of Fox's The Exorcist delivers yet another awful depiction of religious figures. This time, it is a nun who must be demeaned as she actually suggests “mercy killing” as an option.



In “Hero Complex,” Wednesday night’s episode of CBS’s Code Black, two doctors practicing at Angel’s Memorial Hospital clash over California’s End of Life Option Act – state-sanctioned assisted suicide.



The new movie Me Before You looks to be an inspirational love story. A lower-class woman in England is hired to take care of a young man who recently became a quadroplegic after being hit by a car.  He inspires her to live a fuller life; she inspires him to find the joys he can still realize from his wheelchair.

That’s the commercial, but that’s not the actual plot. Spoiler alert: this isn’t a love story, it’s a story of a man’s self-love leading to assisted suicide.



Miguel Almaguer touted "medical aid in dying" in California on Thursday's NBC Nightly News, as the state's new assisted suicide law went into effect. Almaguer showed a clear slant towards proponents of the legislation by playing four soundbites from supporters, versus only two from opponents. He also failed to mention that one booster of the new law was involved in a lawsuit against California's state government to gain the so-called "freedom to control her death."



Jorge Ramos mostró su apoyo al suicidio asistido durante una entrevista reciente con un paciente enfermo terminal de cáncer en Puerto Rico que está tratando de poner fin a su vida en sus propios términos.