Julia A. Seymour

Julia A. Seymour's picture
Assistant Managing Editor for MRC Business

Julia A. Seymour is the Assistant Managing Editor for the MRC Business where she analyzes and exposes media bias on a range of economic and business issues. She has written Special Reports including Global Warming Censored, UnCritical Condition, Networks Hide the Decline in Credibility of Climate Change Science and Obama the Tax Cutter.

Seymour has also appeared on Fox News Channel, Fox Business Network and the Christian Broadcasting Network and has been an in-studio guest on the G. Gordon Liddy Show. She has also done hundreds of radio interviews on a wide-range of topics with stations in more than 35 states as well as many nationally syndicated programs. Her work has appeared or been mentioned by radio host Rush Limbaugh, Mark Levin, The Drudge Report, WorldNetDaily, USA Today, CNBC.com, Motley Fool and “Ted, White and Blue” by Ted Nugent. Prior to joining BMI in 2006, she was a staff writer for Accuracy in Academia where she wrote  about bias in lower and higher education and contributed to the book “The Real MLA Stylebook.” She holds a B.S. in Mass Communications: Print Journalism from Liberty University.

Latest from Julia A. Seymour

Following the resignation of Gary Cohn as top economic adviser, President Donald Trump selected CNBC contributor and former anchor Larry Kudlow for the spot.

Many liberal media outlets raced to attack the vocal free trade proponent who was the latest prominent person to join the Trump administration. Kudlow had previously served as an informal adviser to the campaign. They attacked him over his support for tax cuts and supply-side economics, as well as failed forecasts.


The Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) recently increased its estimates for U.S economic growth.Too bad it didn’t heighten network interest in the U.S. economy.

ABC World News Tonight with David Muir, NBC Nightly News with Lester Holt and CBS Evening News said nothing about the revised forecast on March 13 or March 14.

February job gains came in at a whopping 313,000 new jobs, so much that NBC Nightly News anchor Lester Holt acknowledged it “blows away economists’ expectations.” The Wall Street Journal said expectations were at only 205,000. Unemployment also remained at the 17-year-low of 4.1 percent. But only one of the big three networks gave the good news any serious attention.

For years, the liberal media have promoted erroneous claims that women are paid far less than men for the same jobs. So it was only natural, that many outlets would seize on the claims of a new study called “Women Can’t Win.”

Economic growth updates continue to be minimized or ignored entirely by ABC, NBC and CBS evening newscasts. When the expected revision to 2.5 percent growth during the fourth-quarter of 2017 was announced Feb. 28, 2018, all three programs failed to inform their viewers.

A majority of Americans now support the tax reform package passed by Congress and signed into law by Donald Trump just over two months ago. Just don’t expect the media to tell you about it.

The recent media frenzy over EPA administrator Scott Pruitt’s travel expenses and use of first-class cabins, often lacked crucial information — like the death threats he has received.

According to The Wall Street Journal in November 2017, Pruitt gets five times as many threats as the previous EPA administrator and there had been “explicit death threats.” His family was also threatened. Yet, some media outlets completely ignored the existence of threats as they criticized his travel costs.

The media rarely complain about deficit spending when liberals are at the helm, doling out taxpayer dollars like candy from a parade float. But once Republicans are in control, journalists can’t wait to complain.

The February 2018 stock market correction was painful to watch, but the news media exaggerated the situation — piling on panic and blame with descriptions like “crash” and “freefall” — after ignoring most previous records.

Two nights before the Philadelphia Eagles took home its first Super Bowl trophy, the networks were far more focused on stories related to the big game than to one measure of the U.S. economy. So pre-game stories still outranked the strong jobs report nearly 5-to-1.

While the early February market pullback has spooked some investors and already gained plenty of media attention, it illustrated all too well the broadcast networks’ tendency to cover bad economic news more than good. The networks skipped the vast majority of records as the market climbed throughout 2017 and the beginning of 2018.

When the Dow Jones Industrial Average “nosedived” by nearly 666 points on Feb. 2, it got plenty of network attention. In fact, it got more coverage than the two huge Dow milestones that preceded it — combined.

Although that one-day selloff was a 2.5 percent drop which followed huge gains, the networks emphasized the “worst week for stocks in two years.” ABC World News Tonight with David Muir, NBC Nightly News and CBS Evening News spent a combined 251 seconds on Feb. 2, covering the markets. Those same three shows spent about 33 percent more time on the selloff than on two major milestones during the prolonged stock market rally.

Since the campaign trail, President Donald Trump has made an economic turnaround and prosperity a top priority. But the network news media have not made covering economic news one of theirs.

Too often the networks focused on less important stories, such as Amazon’s unique “reinvented” office space called “The Spheres,” and skipped key economic news.

Thousands of workers across the U.S. were awarded bonuses, wages hikes or higher retirement account matches this year thanks to the tax reform bill recently passed by the GOP and signed into law by President Donald Trump. But this huge economic story affecting so many was practically ignored by the network evening news shows in 2018.

The mayor of New York City is suing the five largest oil companies in the world over climate change. Far left New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio said on Jan. 10, his city was suing BP, Chevron, ConocoPhillips, ExxonMobil and Royal Dutch Shell seeking billions of dollars to “recoup money spent by the city for resiliency efforts related to climate change,” Associated Press reported. Some of the companies disputed his allegations or argued they’ve made “good faith attempts to address climate change.”

A weaker than expected jobs report managed to capture the attention of the three broadcast networks evening newscasts. That was quite a switch.Those same news programs often underreported good economic news in the past year. ABC World News skipped reporting the jobs report four times in 2017.

As much of the U.S. shivers under extreme cold, the liberal media lashed out at President Donald Trump over a tweet about global warming, portraying him as stupid or confused about the difference between weather and climate. Trump had tweeted, “In the East, it could be the COLDEST New Year’s Eve on record. Perhaps we could use a little bit of that good old Global Warming that our Country, but not other countries, was going to pay TRILLIONS OF DOLLARS to protect against. Bundle up!”

British royal Prince Harry and actress Meghan Markle’s new engagement photos were a small part of all three network evening news shows on Dec. 21. But their news dwarfed coverage of U.S. economic growth (GDP), which got only 9 seconds.

Good news for the economy came quickly on the heels of the Republican-driven tax bill. AT&T, Boeing, Wells Fargo, Comcast and others announced employee bonuses or wage increases, additional contributions to training, charitable efforts and facilities, and U.S. investment. Some directly attributed the decision to changes that will affect them in the tax legislation.

For the first time in its 121-year history, the Dow Jones Industrial Average gained more than 5,000 points in a single year, according to CNBC. The major stock index set that record Dec. 18, following a 140-point rally and a new record closing high. CNBC.com also noted that there had been 70 closing highs for the DJIA in 2017.