Hollywood continues to be rocked by Ronan Farrow articles in The New Yorker unfurling charges against powerful men, accusing them of sexual harassment and assault. The latest piece includes a second passel of accusers against CBS CEO Les Moonves, who seemed to have survived a first salvo in July. This time, Moonves is being slowly lowered into a year-long consulting gig after new and nauseating on-the-record accounts from six women.



CBS This Morning co-host Gayle King on Tuesday launched a preemptive strike against her own network, attacking top officials for not showing transparency in an investigation of ex-CEO Les Moonves, a man now accused of sexual harassment and assault. “In our own house, we must have transparency,” demanded King, perhaps in a bid not to, once again, sound as though she was irritated at having to cover such stories at her network. 



CBS’s The Talk led off their Monday show with a nearly 10-minute-long discussion on the ouster of CBS chairman and CEO Les Moonves following another disturbing but thorough report from Ronan Farrow in The New Yorker detailing new allegations of sexual misconduct. The four remaining hosts stated their support for the women and the need to hold Mooves accountable, but they also focused on Chen and the fear that they could lose their jobs.



Almost ten months after bombshell accusations that ex-CBS This Morning co-host Charlie Rose allegedly sexually harassed and abused women, co-host Norah O’Donnell lamented how “hard” it was to have “my boss,” departing CEO Les Moonves, be accused of sexual assault. After a full report opened the show, O’Donnell began her personal remarks with self pity: “This is hard for everybody as CBS News.” 



WASHINGTON — It has been a pretty good week for Donald Trump. The economy is growing faster than anyone on the left or in the middle or among the Never-Trumpers believed possible. Inflation is low, and employment is at a record high. Moreover, the president and the European Union reached an understanding on trade last week that signals the likely end of a trade war, at least with Europe.



Since news broke on Friday of sexual harassment claims against both CBS CEO Les Moonves and longtime 60 Minutes executive producer Jeff Fager, the broadcast network has been in damage control. While CBS News provided full coverage of scandal, reporter Anna Werner made sure to tout the company line that the accusations may just be a case of “corporate hardball” as CBS fights off an attempt to re-merge with its former parent company Viacom.



Senator Marco Rubio continued his participation in the anti-Donald Trump crusade against the liberal media on Tuesday in an MSNBC Town Hall as he pointed out that Trump has received far more media coverage than all his opponents combined and was buttressed by recent comments from CBS chief Les Moonves that Trump has been great for his network’s ratings.



"It may not be good for America, but it's good for CBS."

That's how network executive chairman and reliable Democratic donor Les Moonves described Donald Trump's frontrunner status in the GOP primary, noted the Hollywood Reporter today.



Speaking to a Wall Street crowd at the UBS Global Communications Conference on Monday, CBS chief executive Les Moonves gleefully cheered Republican 2016 contenders going after one another in the primary contest: “We love having all 16 Republican candidates throwing crap at each other. The more they spend, the better it is for us.”



While liberals and journalists love to hype income inequality to slam CEO paychecks and push for a higher minimum wage, a new SEC law shows liberal media CEOs are the ones the media should be criticizing.

On August 8, the Securities and Exchange Commission approved a new rule that requires companies to “disclose the ratio between their chief executives' annual compensation and median, or midpoint, employee pay,” according to the Associated Press.



Look at the size of that wad! It's huge! And it is all 100 dollar bills! How much you carrying there, Les? $5000? $10,000? $20,000? More?

As we have seen, the networks declined to report that their CEOs including CBS CEO Les Moonves who earned over $54 million this past year were "overpaid." Perhaps they were embarrassed to report this. However, even more embarrassing is that Moonves is so cheap that he used a big wad of hundred dollar bills to stiff a restaurant parking valet out of a tip as you can see in the video on the Page Six report of the New York Post:



Les Moonves, chairman and chief executive officer of the CBS Corporation, responded to criticism that the network was replacing David Letterman, a liberal comedian and longtime host of the weeknight Late Show program, with Stephen Colbert, another liberal comic and host of The Colbert Report, who is likely to continue making fun of conservatives and Republicans when he leaves his Comedy Channel program to replace Letterman sometime in 2015.

“Ironically, Stephen Colbert is much more moderate than people think he is,” Moonves said on Wednesday. "He's a great social commentator, and that's sort of what we want. That's sort of what David Letterman has been."