Not even Christmas Day provided respite from New York Times bias: The Sunday Review was devoted to the Year in Pictures, and cast the just-concluded election as a clash of light vs. darkness. The front-page was wholly covered by a full-length photo of Donald Trump -- more accurately, Trump’s shadow -- in stark, Stygian darkness, while the back page featured a hopeful member of the Hillary faithful, clutching an American flag while watching the election results. In the Sunday magazine, devoted to remembrance of famous or significant personalities who passed in 2016, a loving remembrance of Bill Clinton’s liberal Attorney General Janet Reno stood in blunt contrast to a cynical one probing Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia for intellectual blind spots.



On Saturday's New Day on CNN, during a seven and a half minute segment dealing with Ohio's "Heartbeat Bill" that seeks to ban abortion after a heartbeat can be detected, partisan phraseology associated with the liberal side of the issue were repeatedly used by the various on-air CNN personalities who commented on the issue, while the only couple of times when the word choice preferred by conservatives could be heard was in a soundbite from a pro-life activist when the word "pro-life" was used.



Almost every edition of MSNBC’s Hardball offers a spit-take moment courtesy of host Chris Matthews, but it instead was a guest on Tuesday as openly gay former Democratic Congressman Barney Frank (Mass.) smeared late Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia by quipping that on the issue of flag burnings, Scalia wasn’t really supportive that right as much as he was for “fag burning.”



Dahlia Lithwick knows her highly focused resistance movement will fail, but she proposed it anyway. In a Monday piece, the Slate legal analyst exhorted Democrats to “obstruct the nomination and seating” of anyone Donald Trump chooses to succeed Antonin Scalia, because “the current Supreme Court vacancy is not Trump’s to fill. This was President Obama’s vacancy and President Obama’s nomination. Please don’t tacitly give up on [the seat] because it was stolen by unprecedented obstruction and contempt. Instead, do to them what they have done to us. Sometimes, when they go low, we need to go lower, to protect a thing of great value.”



While the liberal “Big Three” networks were up in arms Wednesday evening over the a comment Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump made about “second amendment people” in reference to stopping Hillary Clinton, they were strangely silent then when a Democratic Senate candidate from Ohio was caught celebrated the death of Justice Antonin Scalia.



When George Mason University announced plans to rename its law school after the late Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia, the outrage in liberal academia (to be redundant) was unconfined. The Times followed up Wednesday, with reporter Nicholas Fandos relaying the grim news that Scalia's name would stay. Right from the lead sentence, Fandos really made the libertarian-leaning university sound like the heavy in this story, deaf to the pathetic pleas of students and faculty.



George Mason University law school announced it would be renamed the Antonin Scalia School of Law in honor of the recently deceased justice. Yet even in death, the left and its allies at the Times won’t cease their attacks. Friday’s New York Times featured young reporter Nicholas Fandos, “University Critics Draw a Line at Naming Law School for Scalia.” The online headline was positively “fearful” of the change: “What’s in a Name Change? Politics, Some at George Mason University Fear."



Eight Is Enough was a popular television series in the late 1970s and early ’80s. Dahlia Lithwick hinted in a Saturday article that a show about Republicans’ sour attitude toward the current Supreme Court situation might be called Eight’s Not Enough, with the key role played in absentia by Antonin Scalia.

Lithwick theorized that for Republicans, “the 2016 term was meant to be the Supreme Court’s year to destroy Obama…Had [Scalia] lived until July the docket was full of poisoned pills and silent time bombs that would have exploded in President Obama’s face this summer…GOP senators aren’t just angry about losing Justice Scalia’s seat. They are angry because the court as the weapon of choice to screw the president has been taken from them, and they want it back.”



On the regular "Shields and Brooks" on Friday's PBS NewsHour, it was another case of a liberal analyst and a faux-conservative agreeing with each other as allegedly right-leaning New York Times columnist David Brooks gushed over U.S. Supreme Court nominee Merrick Garland, calling him "an excellent choice," a "model of judicial restraint," and "a man of both amazing integrity and capacity to be emotionally moved" as he urged confirmatiin since a President Hillary Clinton would likely nominate someone who "from a Republican point-of-view, could be a lot worse."



On Friday's Real Time on HBO, host Bill Maher joked about having a fantasy that an apparently unstoppable Donald Trump will unexpectedly drop dead on stage, and, moments later, joked about the possibility that discussing former Vice President Dick Cheney on his show might result in his death as he recalled the coincidental passing of Antonin Scalia and Nancy Reagan right after Maher had mentioned them on the air.



This issue: MSNBC host Chris Matthews says the GOP's "number one goal is to keep blacks from voting," while journalists debate whether Donald Trump more resembles an American Adolf Hitler or a "right-wing" talk radio host. Meanwhile, NBC anchor Lester Holt is already getting tingles up his leg about the prospect of "the first female President;" Disney boss Robert Iger insists that George Stephanopoulos is "fair and unbiased;" and an NPR reporter gushes that being kissed by Fidel Castro's brother is "kind of like getting the blessing of the Holy Trinity."



As Supreme Court arguments loom next week for an abortion-rights case in Texas, the New York Times went all-in, with its former Supreme Court reporter and fervent abortion supporter Linda Greenhouse making the case on the front of the Sunday Review section. While Greenhouse claimed a factual approach, she predictably attacked the Texas clinic regulations as an obvious smoke-screen for an anti-choice agenda. Greenhouse herself certainly has a strong opinion on abortion and many other things, including the "inflammatory" Antonin Scalia, who she criticized just a few days after his death.