On the front of Thursday's Style section, Washington Post media reporter Paul Farhi wrote a piece on blazing-hot author Michael Wolff and his Trump book Fire and Fury. The headline was "A whale of a Trump tale, but is it fishy?" Inside, the headline is "Wolff made up quotes, some of his sources say." 


On Monday morning, NBC News finally terminated the contract of political analyst Mark Halperin five days after allegations surfaced thanks to CNN’s Oliver Darcy that Halperin had been alleged to have engaged in disturbing sexual misconduct while serving as ABC News political director. The Washington Post’s Paul Farhi noted that Halperin’s termination also meant that he will no longer be appearing on MSNBC, where he was a frequent guest on Morning Joe.


On Friday, Washington Post media reporter Paul Farhi asked the question “A briefing room clash may be good TV, but is it good journalism?” The Post mostly answered “yes,” and Farhi never compared today’s clashes to anything that happened under Barack Obama. The journalists who badgered Trump aide Stephen Miller “say they have no regrets for aggressively seeking answers,” Farhi reported.

Jim Acosta boasted “As my mother told me recently, ‘Let other people be the wallflower,’....If quoting from the Statue of Liberty is pushing too hard, I’m going to keep pushing.”


The Washington Post profiled perpetually yelling CNN White House reporter Jim Acosta for Monday's paper under the headline "CNN's Jim Acosta airs the news -- and his irritation." What stuck out most in media reporter Paul Farhi's story was White House spokesman Sean Spicer letting Acosta have it, saying his overt editorializing is all about getting more airtime and Internet clicks: "If I were a mainstream, veteran reporter, I’d be advocating for him to knock it off. It’s hurting the profession.”


The Washington Post offered a strangely bifurcated approach in covering the scandals at CNN. On Wednesday, media reporter Paul Farhi reported an entire story on the firestorm over an unsubstantiated story causing three (voluntary) resignations in the Investigative Unit, but offered no reporting on the Project Veritas expose. On Thursday, Farhi wrote a piece on PV that sounded more like an opposition-research report.


The liberal media is still defending its “mainstream” presence and trying to shame the Trump team out of “normalizing” conservative media outlets. On Saturday, The Washington Post published an article headlined “Press pool, no longer just for the mainstream.” Media reporter Paul Farhi relayed the panic over the strange being who was assigned as the pool reporter for the vice president: Fred Lucas of the Daily Signal.

An “employee of the Heritage Foundation, a conservative think tank…a journalist employed by an organization with a vested interest in the direction of White House and federal policy.” Let those words sink in.


WASHINGTON — Over the weekend some pathetic wretch — obviously a casualty of the Nov. 8 election — writing under the pen name Paul Farhi filed a column in the Washington Post lamenting that after an extensive search of the newspapers of this great country, he could hardly find any pro-Trump columnists. 


CNN media reporter Dylan Byers was seriously unhappy that Washington Post media reporter Paul Farhi wrote a story about how "objective" reporters are unleashing harsh opinions all over Twitter. Byers went on a five-part Twitter rant about how "poorly executed" this story was -- mostly because these liberal opinions were only demonstrated "clever assessments" or a "well-informed understanding" that Trump's campaign was a strategic disaster.


It’s two newspapers in one! The Washington Post ran a bizarre story about Trump and the media on the front page of the Style section on Tuesday. “Trump’s blacklist turns out to be a bit gray” was the headline. Trump’s campaign may deny press credentials, but reporters can easily just attend events and file stories, as Jenna Johnson for the Post is doing now.

But then the “blacklist is really gray” story ends with an overwrought quote from former Washington Post assistant managing editor Susan Glasser suggesting Trump was more “undemocratic” than Vladimir Putin in his press relations. “It is astonishing that something like this is happening in the United States.”


There's no doubt that the current presidential campaign has been more antagonistic than previous contests for the White House, and as a result, one national news organization is taking action to train its correspondents in “hostile environment awareness.”

According to an article by Washington Post media reporter Paul Farhi, the National Public Radio system has sent its political reporters to take part in a 90-minute training course that teaches employees how to handle outbreaks of violence at campaign stops in a system the reporter dubbed “Trump Training.”


Washington Post media reporter Paul Farhi reported Tuesday something that TV news junkies know: “ABC News” is beginning to sound tinny. It’s more like “ABC Fun to Know.” Farhi softened it to “It’s brighter, tighter and indeed quite a bit lighter than its evening rivals.” That’s code for “dumber.” 

Farhi noted ABC has no full-time congressional correspondent for the evening news, and despite the title World News almost never leads with....world news. “During May, the broadcast led with domestic news almost every night of the week, despite a flood of developments in Syria, Iraq, Europe and elsewhere.”


Washington Post media reporter Paul Farhi dragged out a series of tiresome Stephanopoulos defenses on Monday. First, he weirdly claimed no new developments in the scandal (not true). Then he found liberal experts to say that this isn't  a scandal because it doesn't change the ABC anchor's "persona," which is already identified with the Clintons. They even suggested Good Morning America isn't really a news show, so it's not as serious as the Brian Williams scandal.