On Sunday's PoliticsNation on MSNBC, as Al Sharpton presided over a discussion of an upcoming march to commemorate Martin Luther King Jr.'s role in the Civil Rights Movement, the MSNBC host fretted that President Donald Trump is "killing the dream" after one of the guests claimed that MLK Jr.'s "dream" had become a "nightmare" for many.

 


The front page of the Saturday Metro section of The Washington Post offered breaking news on Christian attitudes. “Christians are far more likely than non-Christians to blame poverty on a lack of effort, a poll found.”

This poll from the Post and the Kaiser Family Foundation is three months old, taken from April 13 to May 1. This is not just a poll question; it’s begging for overgeneralization, with “the poor are mostly lazy” being judged by liberals as akin to “Muslims are mostly terrorists” or “Catholic priests are mostly child abusers.”


On the Monday edition of his eponymously named PBS show, host Tavis Smiley provided a forum with little pushback for author and American University Professor Ibram Kendi to claim that the social problems that disproportionately exist within America's black population are the result of continuing racial discrimination, and that those who do not agree with his conclusions therefore must believe blacks are "inferior."


On Sunday's PoliticsNation on MSNBC, during the show's regular "Gotcha" segment, host Al Sharpton was imagining racist dog whistles as he complained about "unmitigated, racially-tinged cruelty" from Congressman Steve King, and suggested that those who think like the Iowa Republican are "evil."

 


On Wednesday's New Day on CNN, during a discussion of how to pay for President Donald Trump's proposed border wall, co-host Alisyn Camerota seemed taken aback that Iowa Republican Rep. Steve King suggested shifting money from the food stamp program to help pay for the wall. Camerota fretted: "You want to take food from people that are s -- the people who are on the lowest rung in terms of the nation's safety net and their children -- in terms of food stamps, you're happy to take -- you're willing to take money from them to build the 1.6 or to give the 1.6 billion to the border wall?"

 


On Wednesday's The 11th Hour with Brian Williams, MSNBC contributor Charlie Sykes joined substitute host Nicolle Wallace -- formerly of the Bush administration -- for a "recovering Republicans" therapy session as the two discussed the Republican health care plan, and, true to form, Sykes made jabs from the left in spite of being a supposedly right-leaning analyst.


Appearing as a panel member on Wednesday's CNN Tonight, CNN presidential historian Douglas Brinkley was negative on Republican efforts to replace Obamacare as he called the effort a "tar baby" for President Donald Trump and asserted that it would "gut" Medicaid and "leave 20 or 22 million people without health care." Former RNC official Mike Shields was left as the only one of four guests to offer a right-leaning point of view on the issue with the other three guests leaning left.

 


On Friday's The Last Word on MSNBC, it was the place for demonizing Republicans as regular MSNBC guests Joan Walsh and Nancy Giles called Republican House Speaker Paul Ryan a "monster" and declared that the way Senate Republicans had handled health care reform has been "criminal."

 


On Friday's Real Time show on HBO, liberal comedian Bill Maher derided the Senate Republican health care plan as being like "a manifesto from the Zodiac killer," and trashed Republican Senator Ted Cruz as someone who does not believe the bill is "mean" enough, and who has experience at "making people sick." He ended the show with a commentary in which he encouraged his audience members to reproduce less and snidely portrayed children as "resource-sucking, waste-making human beings" who are bad for the environment.


As Montel Williams appeared on Friday's CNN Newsroom with Brooke Baldwin to discuss his recent USA Today article attacking Republican plans to repeal ObamaCare, the former talk show host accused congressional Republicans of not caring about their own family members and of supporting a plan that would send their relatives and 140 million other Americans to "death." Williams: "They are going to be looking for somebody to give them medication and health care. And what this bill does is sends them all to death. ... This Congress is the richest Congress we've ever had in history. They can afford premium health care. They don't care about even their own family members -- their cousins, their aunts or uncles or nieces who they all know have just been sentenced to death."


Appearing as a guest on Friday's All In with Chris Hayes on MSNBC, former New York Times executive editor Jill Abramson slammed the Donald Trump administration's accomplishments so far as a "debacle" and declared that the Republican budget has "savagely" taken money from poverty programs and education. Abramson: "I think both of the scenarios, Chris, that you just laid out equal debacle because, you know, he has done quite a bit, but I think what he's done has been, you know, altogether damaging both to the country and internationally. ... A budget that has savagely taken money from housing programs from the poor, federal money for the schools."

 


As the Reverend William Barber appeared as a guest on Saturday's AM Joy on MSNBC to give his religion-based views on current events, host Joy Reid at one point seemed to worry about not being able to talk more about Republican Rep. Steve Scalise's conservative views and his history on "race," as she recalled the discredited story that the congressman spoke to a white nationalist event 15 years ago.