We wouldn't normally evaluate a "fact check" when it lines up with all the available facts. But it can be noteworthy when Democrats are tagged as "Four Pinocchios" False. Both the Washington Post Fact Checker and FactCheck.org flagged Senators and presidential candidates Kamala Harris and Elizabeth Warren for incorrectly claiming Michael Brown was "murdered" in Ferguson, Missouri by police officer Darren Wilson. 



The creative team behind Unplanned couldn’t have been happier with their film’s debut north of the border. That’s not the end of the story, though. Unplanned earned a robust $18.8 million at the U.S. box office, but the film initially struggled to find distributors to bring it to Canadian crowds. For context, many indie features fail to crack $1 million at the U.S. box office.



Detective Armando Cruz (Armando Riesco) is known by fellow Detective Alice Toussaint (Crystal Ann Dickinson) as having a “bleeding heart for black men,” and in May 26’s episode of Showtime's The Chi, “Blind Eye,” viewers gain a glimpse as to why.



This week, “journalist, activist and humanitarian” Shaun King will give a keynote speech at the annual Innocence Network conference in Atlanta, Georgia. The theme of the event, whose attendees work to prevent and undo wrongful convictions, is “The Presumption of Innocence.” I've covered many flabbergasting things over the course of 25 years as a columnist, author, blogger and documentary host, but this one takes the cake.



National Public Radio hailed science-fiction author N.K. Jemisin, who has now won the Hugo Award for three straight years from the World Science Fiction Convention. NPR anchor Ari Shapiro explained her "Broken Earth" books "take place in a world where natural disasters are more common and more destructive. And the people with powers to mitigate those disasters are feared and oppressed."

But it turns out this is science fiction "ripped from the headlines" -- and somehow, in Jemisin's mind, the Ferguson riots of 2014 were an "unarmed, peaceful protest."



Over the past several days, during discussions of the white supremacist rally in Charlottesville from a year ago, MSNBC contributor Jason Johnson went off the rails again as he not only defended the far-left group Antifa's hostility to cops, but he even suggested that police officers in Ferguson, Missouri, responding to the 2014 riots could be likened to white nationalists attacking blacks.



Thursday on ABC’s The View, the hosts had on former Ferguson police chief, Tom Jackson, to talk about his new book about his experience in Ferguson during the Michael Brown shooting. During the conversation, Jackson tried to dispel many of the media myths concerning the shooting of Brown, but instead he got an earful from hosts Sunny Hostin and Whoopi Goldberg about the credibility of “Hands Up, Don’t Shoot.”

 


Wednesday night’s episode of Fox’s newest racially obsessed drama Shots Fired, “Hour 7: Content of Their Character,” took a short break from race-baiting to highlight the unnecessary destruction that comes from riots like Ferguson and Baltimore. In the wake of violent demonstrations in Gate Station, DOJ Special Prosecutor Preston Terry (Stephen James) becomes disheartened at the sight of the devastation of his kind friend’s restaurant. He states the obvious regarding the destructive riots: “I don't know what's supposed to be gained by all this.”



On Wednesday night’s episode of Shots Fired on FOX, “Hour 6: The Fire this Time,” the town of Gate Station, North Carolina became the site of violent, racially motivated riots, to the delight of Pastor Janae. As racial tensions in the town escalate, Pastor Janae follows through on her desire for another Ferguson. She urges a crowd to action by calling for a “fire to burn down police brutality,” “racism,” and “injustice.” Although she uses the word “riot,” she claims that this will be a riot of peace, not violence.



Wednesday night’s episode of Shots Fired, “Hour 5: Before the Storm,” officially established the show as over-the-top, race-baiting nonsense. While DOJ Special Prosecutor Preston Terry (Stephen James) and Investigator Ashe Akino (Sanaa Lathan) delve deeper into their investigation of the deaths of black, unarmed teen Joey Campbell and white, unarmed teen Jesse Carr, their discovery about the white, racist police department out to get black people takes an inexplicable turn. Akino pieces together that rich, white people are hunting poor, black people for sport. Literally.



He's the new Al Sharpton on steroids -- and he's coming to a TV near you.
Benjamin Crump, camera-lovin' lawyer for the families of Trayvon Martin and Michael Brown, rocketed to fame perpetuating the "Hands up, don't shoot" lie. Never mind that even the left-wing Obama Justice Department concluded that the 22 witnesses who manufactured the Black Lives Matter-promoted narrative were unreliable, inconsistent, self-contradictory, unsupported by a shred of forensic evidence, or outright lying.



In what could only be described as one of the most cringe-worthy and disrespectful interview to date, Fox News Channel host Martha MacCallum took on a petulant filmmaker in Jason Pollock and his “documentary” on the murder of Michael Brown during Monday night’s First 100 Days.