Michelle Malkin

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Syndicated Columnist


Syndicated columnist and best-selling author.

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This week, “journalist, activist and humanitarian” Shaun King will give a keynote speech at the annual Innocence Network conference in Atlanta, Georgia. The theme of the event, whose attendees work to prevent and undo wrongful convictions, is “The Presumption of Innocence.” I've covered many flabbergasting things over the course of 25 years as a columnist, author, blogger and documentary host, but this one takes the cake.



If you're a sleazy male Democrat, you can always count on Nancy Pelosi to run interference for you and your pervy proclivities. While she has soaked up plaudits as a champion for women (most recently as the VH1 Trailblazer Honors recipient last month for International Women's Day), what she really deserves is Cheerleader of the Year Award from the Democratic Bad Boys Club.



How did hate crime huckster Jussie Smollett get away with it? All crooked roads in Chicago lead back to the Obamas. On Tuesday, as part of a sealed deal, the Illinois state attorney's office dismissed 16 felony charges brought by a grand jury against the Trump-hating actor, who blamed phantom white MAGA supporters for a brutal racist “assault” that left him with a teensy-weensy scratch under his eye. 



The Council on American-Islamic Relations is having a banner month. The militant Muslim group never lets a crisis go to waste. That means Americans should beware. When unappeasable CAIR is ascendant, our free speech rights, religious liberty and national security are at risk. Following the horrible massacre at two mosques in Christchurch, New Zealand, CAIR flacks were out in full force decrying “Islamophobia” and calling for crackdowns on “hate speech” (by which they mean any and all negative thoughts or words about CAIR or Islam).



The father of the World Wide Web is right: It’s time to take back “complete control of your data.” Tim Berners-Lee, who conceived the first internet browser 30 years ago this week, warned of its increasing threats to “privacy, security and fundamental rights.” To mark the anniversary, he argued that demanding transparency is key to stopping the web's “downward plunge to a dysfunctional future.”



Last week, the little birdies in Twitter's legal department notified me that one of my tweets from 2015 is “in violation of Pakistan law.” It seems like ancient history, but Islamic supremacists never forget — or forgive. My innocuous tweet featured a compilation image of the 12 Muhammad cartoons published by Danish newspaper Jyllands-Posten in 2005. It also linked to my Jan. 8, 2015, syndicated column on the Charlie Hebdo jihad massacre in Paris. 



Is it any wonder that American news consumers are at the end of their ropes of patience with the “mainstream media?” Three weeks ago, when I first documented troubling questions, contradictions and doubts about Trump-hating, attention-craving actor Jussie Smollett's absurd hate crime claims, few in the “professional” journalism herd paid heed. Now, with a grand jury investigation on the horizon, everyone's a Johnny-come-lately debunker. And everyone's making excuses: How could we have known? Why would anyone lie about racism? What could have possibly prepared us for such a scandalous swindle?



If you are puzzled by the nationwide rape kit testing backlog, Oklahoma provides maddening insight on the bureaucratic forces that create intolerable inertia — and injustice. An estimated 225,000 rape kits have gone unprocessed across the country; more than 7,200 have been neglected in Oklahoma.



Crying “hate” is a lazy way to debate. But in the Beltway, where honest discussion and vigorous deliberation are desperately needed, the rhetorical sloth is so thick you need a Big Foot circular saw to cut it. Take Minnesota Democratic Rep. Ilhan Omar, who thrust a Liberian immigrant, Linda Clark, into the limelight as her State of the Union special guest and poster child. “She has lived here over 18 years,” Rep. Omar lamented, “and there's no reason she should be taken from her family.” Ahead of the annual address to Congress on Tuesday, Rep. Omar blasted President Donald Trump for “threatening to deport” Clark and “thousands of Liberians for no reason other than hate.”



Here we go again. If you think the manure-spreaders of sensationalism who masquerade as ethical practitioners of journalism learned anything from last week's MAGA-bashing Covington Catholic High School hoax, I have three words for you: Ha, ha, ha. On Tuesday morning, uncorroborated claims by actor Jussie Smollett that he was the victim of a “brutal” hate crime by Trump supporters in Chicago went viral across social media.



Sometimes, a three-point celebration is just a three-point celebration. Sometimes, a pep rally is just a pep rally. Sometimes, a smile is just a smile. And sometimes, a hat is just a hat. Only among the most deranged partisans could a universal sports ritual, a common high school activity, a typical teen face and patriotic headgear be construed as evil symbols of patriarchal oppression. These, however, are the soul-sapping, lunacy-inducing times in which we live.



One of the world's most successful brands committed ideological hara-kiri this week. Recognized around the world as a symbol of manly civility for more than a century, Gillette will now be remembered as the company that did itself in by sacrificing a massive consumer base at the altar of progressivism. To which I say: R.I.P.-C. (Rest In Political Correctness). In case you hadn't seen or heard, parent company Procter & Gamble launched a Gillette ad campaign blanket-demonizing men as ogres and bullies. 



In the still of the last night of 2018, the silence of California Dems chilled the air and airwaves. Border wall opponent Sen. Kamala Harris tweeted three times between Christmas and New Year's Eve bemoaning the plight of illegal immigrants and their children. But not a peep was heard from Harris about the brutal shooting death of Newman, California, Police Department Cpl. Ronil Singh at the hands of a Mexican gang member illegally in the country and protected by the very sanctuary policies Harris champions.



Men get a bad rap. They’re blamed collectively for rape culture, violence, war, poverty, climate change and all other manner of global suffering. They’re forced to apologize on college campuses for their chromosomes, anatomy and athleticism. They’re vilified incessantly in women’s magazines, on women’s talk shows and at women’s confabs promoting the male-bashing #MeToo movement. Not me.



This week, I did something that USA Today’s executive leadership apparently hadn't done lately: I read the newspaper’s “principles of ethical conduct for newsrooms.” It's pretty highfalutin. The media manifesto of virtue, posted online, applies to all employees “working with any news platform, including newspapers, websites, mobile devices, video, social media channels and live story events.” 



Impolite question, but it needs to be asked: Is there a Republican dead body that left-wing partisans won’t use to bash Donald Trump? This week’s partisan corpse abusers callously exploited the passing of George H.W. Bush, America’s 41st president, to get in their digs at the current commander in chief. Their vulgar level of incivility was inversely propositional to their sanctimonious calls for decency.



This is a tale of two young, outspoken women in media. One is a liberal tech writer. The other is an enterprising conservative new media reporter. One has achieved meteoric success and now works at a top American newspaper. The other has been de-platformed and marginalized. Their wildly different fates tell you everything you need to know about Silicon Valley's free speech double standards.



The package of criminal justice reform proposals endorsed by President Donald Trump is not “soft” on crime. It's tough on injustice. And it's about time. Known as the “First Step Act,” the legislation confronts the Titanic failure of the federal government's trillion-dollar war on drugs by reforming mandatory minimum sentences, rectifying unscientifically grounded disparities in criminal penalties for crack vs. powder cocaine users, and tackling recidivism among federal inmates through risk assessment, earned-time credit incentive structures, re-entry programs and transitional housing.



Former President Selfie Stick is back in action, firing up Democrats before the midterms with his signature rallying cries: I, I, I, I! Me, me, me! My, my, my! According to a tally by The American Mirror's Kyle Olson, Barack Obama's campaign speech Monday for Nevada Senate Democratic candidate Jacky Rosen referred to himself 92 times in 38 minutes -- or an average self-allusion every 24.7 seconds. When he wasn't "I"-ing, the former narcissist-in-chief was lying.



The metaphors don't get any better (or worse) than this: A van carrying Hillary Clinton, fresh from throwing her #MeToo sisters under the bus this weekend, crashed into a parking garage pillar on the way to a New Jersey campaign fundraiser Tuesday for beleaguered Democratic Sen. Bob Menendez. At her side was Huma Abedin, who is divorcing convicted serial sexter and underage girl stalker ex-Democratic Rep. Anthony Weiner.