Michelle Malkin

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Syndicated Columnist


Syndicated columnist and best-selling author.

Latest from Michelle Malkin

Impolite question, but it needs to be asked: Is there a Republican dead body that left-wing partisans won’t use to bash Donald Trump? This week’s partisan corpse abusers callously exploited the passing of George H.W. Bush, America’s 41st president, to get in their digs at the current commander in chief. Their vulgar level of incivility was inversely propositional to their sanctimonious calls for decency.



This is a tale of two young, outspoken women in media. One is a liberal tech writer. The other is an enterprising conservative new media reporter. One has achieved meteoric success and now works at a top American newspaper. The other has been de-platformed and marginalized. Their wildly different fates tell you everything you need to know about Silicon Valley's free speech double standards.



The package of criminal justice reform proposals endorsed by President Donald Trump is not “soft” on crime. It's tough on injustice. And it's about time. Known as the “First Step Act,” the legislation confronts the Titanic failure of the federal government's trillion-dollar war on drugs by reforming mandatory minimum sentences, rectifying unscientifically grounded disparities in criminal penalties for crack vs. powder cocaine users, and tackling recidivism among federal inmates through risk assessment, earned-time credit incentive structures, re-entry programs and transitional housing.



Former President Selfie Stick is back in action, firing up Democrats before the midterms with his signature rallying cries: I, I, I, I! Me, me, me! My, my, my! According to a tally by The American Mirror's Kyle Olson, Barack Obama's campaign speech Monday for Nevada Senate Democratic candidate Jacky Rosen referred to himself 92 times in 38 minutes -- or an average self-allusion every 24.7 seconds. When he wasn't "I"-ing, the former narcissist-in-chief was lying.



The metaphors don't get any better (or worse) than this: A van carrying Hillary Clinton, fresh from throwing her #MeToo sisters under the bus this weekend, crashed into a parking garage pillar on the way to a New Jersey campaign fundraiser Tuesday for beleaguered Democratic Sen. Bob Menendez. At her side was Huma Abedin, who is divorcing convicted serial sexter and underage girl stalker ex-Democratic Rep. Anthony Weiner.



“Gosnell: The Trial of America's Biggest Serial Killer” debuts in theaters nationwide on Oct. 12. I do believe this groundbreaking film by indie producers Phelim McAleer and Ann McElhinney is the most important movie in America right now — a true-life saga of good vs. evil, deadly medical malpractice, systemic government malfeasance and cultural apathy toward the most vulnerable members of our society.



How did we get here? The Kavanaugh Supreme Court nomination circus didn't happen by accident. The emergence of incredible — and by “incredible,” I mean the literal Merriam-Webster definition of “too extraordinary and improbable to be believed” — accusers in the 11th hour was no mistake. It is my contention that this grand unearth-and-destroy spectacle was planned, coordinated and facilitated by Senate Judiciary Committee Democrats and their staffers.



No consent. No disclosure. No escape. For legions of unwitting students and teachers across the country, this is the dangerous, de facto data policy Google has imposed over their school districts. An estimated 80 million students and teachers are now signed up for free “G Suite for Education” accounts (formerly known as Google Apps for Education); more than 25 million students and teachers now use Google Chromebooks. A Google logon is the key to accessing homework, quizzes, tests, group discussions, presentations, spreadsheets and other “seamless communication.” 



I have a message for virtue-signaling men who've rushed to embrace #MeToo operatives hurling uncorroborated sexual assault allegations into the chaotic court of public opinion. Stuff it. Your blanket “Believe Women” bloviations are moral and intellectual abominations that insult every human being of sound mind and soul.



Remember. Forget. Repeat. For 17 years, America has engaged in a collective ritual every Sept. 11: Hang flags, light candles, bow heads and make vows to "Never forget." Then, every Sept. 12, it's back to business as usual: See something, do nothing. Did you remember that five of the 9/11 hijackers -- Mohamed Atta, Marwan al-Shehhi, Hani Hanjour, Nawaf al-Hazmi and Satam al-Suqami -- carried out their killer plot after overstaying their visas, evading detection and avoiding deportation?



Question: What is more cringe-inducing than a celebrity funeral? Answer: Two back-to-back celebrity funerals. The ghoulish twin spectacles last week memorializing Aretha Franklin and John McCain brought out the worst in family, friends and frenemies. No matter your partisan affiliation, these vulgar exercises in self-indulgence should serve as object lessons on how not to depart with dignity.



In the competition of ideas, you can't win the game if you're not on the playing field. That's why Silicon Valley bigwigs' stubborn refusal to put business above their own personal partisan biases doesn't just rankle. It reeks. Equal access to social media is not just about sharing food pics, pet videos, makeup tutorials and travelogues. It's about ensuring the ability to disseminate and distribute political speech on the world's biggest platforms.



At this unique moment in American history, liberals and conservatives have something in common: an abhorrence of government prosecutors run amok. Republicans are livid at the federal fishing expedition known as the Mueller investigation. Bit players have been dragooned into an endlessly politicized probe. The media has taken sides; nonstop leaks have tainted the process.



It's quite simple: Some political relatives are more equal than others. Agenda-driven journalists love to exploit familial dysfunction when a prominent politician is conservative and his or her kinfolk espouse liberal views. When a vengeful offspring, sibling, cousin or distant relation wants to wreak havoc, instant fame and adoration are just a tweet or call away. The media schadenfreude over such bloody bloodline battles is thicker than California wildfire smoke.



“Frontier justice” costs too many citizens of all races, creeds, and backgrounds their freedom and their lives. In the old days of the Wild West, vigilantes worked outside the judicial system to punish rivals regardless of their guilt or innocence. Today, outlaws operate inside the bureaucracy to secure criminal convictions at all costs.



“If it wasn't for my artwork and God, there's no way we'd be having this conversation right now.” I'm in Colorado on a three-way phone call with Valentino Dixon, inmate No. 91B1615 at New York's Wende Correctional Facility, and his 27-year-old daughter, Tina Dixon, a first-grade teacher in Ohio. Faith, family and drawing -- golf courses, jazz musicians, landscapes -- have kept him alive and sane behind bars.



To commemorate my 25th wedding anniversary this week to my husband, Jesse, I asked readers on Facebook to share their own secrets to a long happy marriage. In short, the crowdsourced recipe for marital endurance includes faith, forgiveness, romance, kindness, selflessness and a healthy dose of humor. A union built to last begins with a promise and persists through compromise and commitment. It is about keeping your word, choosing the right words and knowing when no words are necessary.



It costs a pretty penny to earn a diploma in stupid. The annual list price to attend Boston University -- including tuition, fees, room and board -- currently rounds out to $70,000. To acquire a degree in economics from this tony institution of higher learning, an undergrad must complete courses in calculus, microeconomic and macroeconomic analysis, empirical economics, statistics and assorted electives.



I thought we had seen it all from radical feminists — and what we've seen is way, way more than anyone other than a gynecologist needs to see. Six years ago, Code Pink zealots traipsed across the fruited plain in giant female reproductive organ costumes demanding “respect” for women's bodies and women's abortion rights. They called themselves “dancing vaginas.”



Amid all the raging political headlines and hyperventilating tweets of the Summer of Resistance, a searing ember of news stopped me in my tracks this week. Jahi McMath has passed away. I never had a chance to meet the young California teen, but her fight for life gripped me three years ago and was never far from my mind or heart -- especially as my own daughter, the same age as Jahi, battled her own health crisis.