The competition for dumbest quote I have been able to find by a leftist tonight just heated up.

Earlier this evening, I noted that Washington Post columnist David Ignatius on Thursday called President Obama "perhaps the least political president in modern U.S. history." One might think that nothing could possibly top that. Actually, I have found two which belong in the running in one long writeup at NewRepublic.com (HT to emailer "Just the Tip HQ") about Obama's chief adviser, Valerie Jarrett.



On Thursday, the first paragraph of a column by the Washington Post's David Ignatius on what he thinks President Barack Obama's foreign policy might be for the next two years contained what may qualify as the "Notable Quotable" of the year.

The first sentence was a pretty impressive failure at perception: "President Obama looked almost relieved after Tuesday’s election blowout." Look, David, even the Associated Press, aka the Administration's Press, noted that Obama "struck a defiant tone." But it's the second sentence of Ignatius's opening paragraph that is the side-splitter (HT Patterico):



One of the Republican winners in Nevada on Tuesday was Attorney General-elect Adam Laxalt, the 34-year-old grandson of former Sen. Paul Laxalt, 91. This came despite the local media favoring his Democratic opponent, Ross Miller.

Ciara Matthews at NevadaWatchdog.org reported that the state’s top political reporter, Jon Ralston of the Las Vegas Sun, was “instrumental” in helping Miller’s dad write a memoir, but he never disclosed it in his reporting on the A.G. race.



On Sunday, Governor Scott Walker (R-WI) appeared on NBC’s Meet the Press to discuss his reelection victory last week and was met with a barrage of questions from moderator Chuck Todd. During the interview, the Meet the Press moderator repeatedly pressed the Republican governor from the left over his economic record and wondered “is it possible that the idea of cutting taxes as a way to create jobs and stimulate the economy just isn't working in Wisconsin?” 



Appearing on ABC’s This Week w/ George Stephanopoulos on Sunday, Mark Halperin co-host of With All Due Respect on Bloomberg, pressed the GOP to take “take some risks” after winning control of the Senate during this year’s midterm elections. Speaking during a panel discussion, Halperin argued that the GOP runs the risk “standing up to the Tea Party caucus and talk radio” but that they must take risks “if they want to do what's good for their politics and good for the country.” 



On Friday night, HBO’s Bill Maher resoundingly mocked the Democratic Party’s electoral defeat during this year’s midterm election but made sure to attack the Republican Party as being motivated by race. During a panel discussion on Real Time w/ Bill Maher, Maher proclaimed that “the issue in this election was still the first black president. I really do. I think it was still resentment about his winning re-election and it was just those people who came out to vote, wanted to prove to the rest of America that they were right all along about how much Obama sucks.”  



CNN's Don Lemon, Chris Cuomo, and Alisyn Camerota stuck to the left's spin about the results of the 2014 midterm elections on Thursday's CNN Tonight, as they discussed President Obama's Wednesday press conference. Lemon wondered, "Why do people vote against their own interests? Because if you look at West Virginia, Kentucky, Arkansas...they put mostly Republicans in office...But they are the states that are benefiting the most from the Affordable Care Act."



Over at Politico, Kevin Robillard devoted a story on November 7 to the matter of "How Larry Hogan won in Maryland." But throughout the story, Robillard weaved a narrative that almost if not completely pooh-poohed the idea that the Anne Arundel County businessman had anything to do with his Tuesday night victory. Instead,he noted, the credit goes in large part to Hogan luckily running in a Republican wave year and the Democrats making key tactical blunders on the campaign trail.



"Md. looks for clues to what Hogan will do," blared the Metro section front-page headline in Friday's Washington Post. But rather than examine what the average Joe or Jane Marylander thinks about the Republican governor-elect, the Post's Jenna Johnson and John Wagner turned to reliably left-wing interest groups for their thoughts and fears about an administration that is likely to be considerably more conservative than the Democratic one on the way out the door.



The delusion is strong with this one.

On Friday's Morning Joe program on what remains of MSNBC, Al Sharpton, completely ignoring how late appearances in Maryland and Illinois by President Barack Obama and his wife Michelle coincided with significant deterioration in the situations of Democratic Party gubernatorial candidates in Maryland and Illinois, blamed Bill and Hillary Clinton, and not the Obamas, for Tuesday's Democratic debacle.



For years, liberal journalists have been predicting Republican doom with Hispanics, declaring that rage from the growing ethnic population would result in a permanent GOP minority. NBC's Matt Lauer, for instance, wondered if the severe "damage" could be repaired. Yet, the Republican landslide on Tuesday was powered, in part, by a strong showing with Latinos. So far, this has been met with disinterest from the three networks. 



On Thursday night, NBC Nightly News played up the current political state of affairs in Washington as both Republicans and Democrats having “dug in” to their policy preferences, but focused only on how Republicans want to repeal “the President’s signature accomplishment” and are angered that he will go through with an executive order on illegal immigration. 

Anchor Brian Williams first teased the upcoming segment by NBC News senior White House correspondent Chris Jansing by wondering “how's that cooperation going that everybody promised after the election results.”