Julia A. Seymour

Julia A. Seymour's picture
Assistant Managing Editor for MRC Business


Julia A. Seymour is the Assistant Managing Editor for the MRC Business where she analyzes and exposes media bias on a range of economic and business issues. She has written Special Reports including Global Warming Censored, UnCritical Condition, Networks Hide the Decline in Credibility of Climate Change Science and Obama the Tax Cutter.

Seymour has also appeared on Fox News Channel, Fox Business Network and the Christian Broadcasting Network and has been an in-studio guest on the G. Gordon Liddy Show. She has also done hundreds of radio interviews on a wide-range of topics with stations in more than 35 states as well as many nationally syndicated programs. Her work has appeared or been mentioned by radio host Rush Limbaugh, Mark Levin, The Drudge Report, WorldNetDaily, USA Today, CNBC.com, Motley Fool and “Ted, White and Blue” by Ted Nugent. Prior to joining BMI in 2006, she was a staff writer for Accuracy in Academia where she wrote  about bias in lower and higher education and contributed to the book “The Real MLA Stylebook.” She holds a B.S. in Mass Communications: Print Journalism from Liberty University.

Latest from Julia A. Seymour

CNBC’s Squawk on the Street and Bloomberg.com viewed the latest U.S. GDP report as good news for the Trump administration. The 4.1 percent second-quarter GDP estimate announced July 27, was the best quarterly pace in almost four years. Bloomberg.com called it a “Win for Trump” that same day.



New York Daily News’ parent company Tronc announced it would cut the tabloids newsroom staff in half on July 23. DeadSpin viewed the act as class warfare.

Tronc attributed the cuts to “realities of our business and the need to adapt to an ever-changing media environment,” according to CBSNews.com. A $15 million payout to CEO Michael Ferro (bundling the three-year obligations into a single payment) ahead of sexual harassment claims against him surfaced in March, put Tronc $14.8 million in the red in the first quarter.



When it comes to profiling major political figures, the task should — and usually does — fall to a knowledgeable political reporter. But The New York Times Magazine’s profile of left-wing billionaire George Soros fell to a writer who specializes in ... tennis and wine.



More Americans are quitting their jobs and even some media are admitting “that’s a good thing.”

The rising rate of American workers quitting their jobs voluntarily shows their confidence in the economy, especially the labor market. The quits rate is the highest its been since 2001. Many news outlets reported the good economic news, but not ABC and NBC news programming according to a Nexis search from July 4-15. (During that time other media were focused on the numbers and the May data was released).



Paid Off is a brand-new TV game show that claims to be “working to end the student debt crisis.” The show’s host even told a liberal magazine Paid Off stands on the shoulders of the Occupy Movement, revealing the game show’s tilt to the left on the issue of student loans.



The June jobs report was more good news for American job seekers. The Bureau of Labor Statistics announced July 6, that 213,000 new jobs were added in June.

That was more than economists expected. The prior two months were also revised up, adding another 37,000 jobs.



Last month, 213,000 new jobs were added to the U.S. economy — more than expected by analysts. Jobs figures from the previous two months were also revised up by a total of 37,000 jobs. This good news about job gains and increased participation in the labor market drew praise from CNBC’s panelists on July 6, even from former Obama administration economist Jared Bernstein.



The climate alarmists writers at InsideClimateNews (ICN) seemed thrilled that Rhode Island became the first state to sue oil companies over climate change.

Rhode Island’s State Attorney General Peter F. Kilmartin filed suit against 14 oil and gas companies and affiliates on July 2, 2018, claiming “Big oil knew for decades that greenhouse gas pollution from their operations and their products were having a significant and detrimental impact on the earth’s climate.”



In a recent Rolling Stone interview, liberal billionaire Tom Steyer said perhaps a “nuclear war” would turn people against President Donald Trump, and “then we get a real course correction.” Contributing editor Tim Dickinson barely pushed back, simply saying, “Wow — that’s ... sobering.”



The eco-focused website Grist is thrilled that socialist candidate Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez beat out a 10-term Democratic congressman in New York. Because of climate change.

Her extreme environmental goals made meteorologist and climate alarmist Eric Holthaus positively twitterpaited.



It’s clear from MSNBC anchor Chris Hayes’s twitter feed, he was unhappy with the Supreme Court decision that limited the power of public sector unions.

The Supreme Court ruled 5-4 in favor of Mark Janus, a public employee who took his union to court, in the Janus v. AFSCME case. Janus claimed being required to pay fees amounted to “compelled speech” because public sector unions are inherently political. In a June 27, 2018, decision the court agreed that employees of public sector unions should not have to pay such “fair share” fees because it violates their First Amendment rights.



Once again, the broadcast networks have proven they care more about economic news that makes President Donald Trump look bad, than stories that make him look good.

On June 25, CNBC reported that its All-America Economic Survey found “more than half the public approving” of the president’s economic decisions for the first time and more people who said the economy was “good or excellent” than in the past decade.



Yahoo! Finance certainly has almost Krugman-like timing. New York Times economist Paul Krugman immediately reacted to the 2016 election of Donald Trump by warning of a possible “global recession.” Perhaps Yahoo! was taking pointers for its latest series.



Slacktivism may have reached its final frontier. Video gaming.

Grist’s Jesse Nichols touted efforts of University of Washington scientist Dargan Frierson to create climate change video games. The lefty environmental website asked, “Could a video game help us solve climate change?”



The official announcement of second-quarter economic growth won’t be out until July 27, but already the predictions look good. Just don’t expect to hear them on ABC, CBS and NBC.

Economists and Wall Street firms have been crunching numbers and making predictions Amherst Pierpont, Oxford Economics, the Atlanta Federal Reserve and Moody’s all forecast estimates of 4 percent or higher growth in the second quarter, CNBC reported on June 14. The very next day, Goldman Sachs released its model also pointing to 4 percent Q2 GDP, based on a manufacturing report.



The Aquaman movie will turn the typical Hollywood environmental themes on its head — with a villain at war with mankind over pollution. On June 15, Entertainment Weekly reported that actor Patrick Wilson would play Aquaman Arthur Curry’s antagonist and half-brother King Orm in the movie which will be in theaters in December.



An investment conference isn’t the typical place to hear climate change complaints and attacks on capitalism, but that’s exactly what attendees heard at the Morningstar Investment Conference in Chicago on June 12. Investor Jeremy Grantham, co-founder of $70 billion global asset management firm, Grantham Mayor Van Otterloo (GMO), blamed capitalism for threatening the planet, according to CNBC.



Billionaire Tom Steyer won’t be alone in pouring millions into the 2018 midterms to get liberals elected. The Washington Post reported on June 9, that fellow liberal billionaire George Soros also intends to spend at least $15 million to help the left this election cycle.



There are now more job openings in America than Americans looking for jobs.

The Wall Street Journal reported on June 5, that in spring 2018, the U.S. economy reached this unique milestone — the first time since the Labor Department began tracking the statistic in 2000.



The “booming jobs market” got very different treatment from each of the three broadcast networks as unemployment dropped to 3.8 percent.

While ABC, CBS and NBC evening news shows all reported the “stronger than expected” numbers, NBC Nightly News spent more than four times as long complaining about a tweet from President Trump ahead of the jobs numbers and fears of a trade war that “threaten” American jobs on June 1. CBS Evening News shortchanged the economy, spending only 17 seconds on the latest employment data.