Julia A. Seymour

Julia A. Seymour's picture
Assistant Managing Editor for MRC Business


Julia A. Seymour is the Assistant Managing Editor for the MRC Business where she analyzes and exposes media bias on a range of economic and business issues. She has written Special Reports including Global Warming Censored, UnCritical Condition, Networks Hide the Decline in Credibility of Climate Change Science and Obama the Tax Cutter.

Seymour has also appeared on Fox News Channel, Fox Business Network and the Christian Broadcasting Network and has been an in-studio guest on the G. Gordon Liddy Show. She has also done hundreds of radio interviews on a wide-range of topics with stations in more than 35 states as well as many nationally syndicated programs. Her work has appeared or been mentioned by radio host Rush Limbaugh, Mark Levin, The Drudge Report, WorldNetDaily, USA Today, CNBC.com, Motley Fool and “Ted, White and Blue” by Ted Nugent. Prior to joining BMI in 2006, she was a staff writer for Accuracy in Academia where she wrote  about bias in lower and higher education and contributed to the book “The Real MLA Stylebook.” She holds a B.S. in Mass Communications: Print Journalism from Liberty University.

Latest from Julia A. Seymour

California’s “exceptional drought” isn’t exceptionally bad any more. Winter storms have been good for the state, pulling it out of the worst rating from the U.S. Drought Monitor. However, this “huge improvement” barely registered with the broadcast networks that had blamed “climate change” for the crisis.

CNN.com reported on Jan. 26, that “California’s drought is almost over.” For the first time in 36 months, no part of California was under “exceptional drought.” It also showed that only a small portion of the state still in “extreme drought,” but cautioned the drought is not “officially over” yet. But with nearly twice the normal amount of snowpack for the time of year, there were reasons for optimism.


Critics gave former Vice President Al Gore grief for predicting in An Inconvenient Truth that major cities including lower Manhattan would be underwater if severe ice melt occurred. Now Gore is rewriting history to claim his prediction came true in order to promote his upcoming film, An Inconvenient Sequel: Truth to Power, which debuted at Sundance on Jan. 19.

In this case, context is the difference between honesty and self-interested revisionism.


Former Vice President Al Gore still has admirers among the media, if the latest issue of The Hollywood Reporter is any guide.

Timed to the Sundance Film Festival opening night premiere of Gore’s Inconvenient Truth sequel, Gore sits regally perched on a stool on the cover of THR’s Jan. 27, issue.

Tatiana Siegel’s cover story dripped with adulation for Gore’s “optimism” and environmentalism, and was entirely devoid of criticism of him or his films. There was no mention of the errors or failed predictions in the An Inconvenient Truth, no charges of hypocrisy for flying around the world to show a slideshow instead of using videoconferencing or some other technology, and no reminder that the planet managed to survive beyond Gore’s “point of no return.” 


Policing the unruly anti-pipeline protests in North Dakota since August came with an exorbitant price tag for North Dakota taxpayers. The Morton County Sheriff’s Department released new figures on Jan. 9, showing the state and local police response cost a whopping $22.3 million since Aug. 10. But the broadcast evening news shows paid no attention to that on Jan. 10.


When someone from Donald Trump’s transition team sent a questionnaire with climate questions to the Department of Energy, the liberal media quickly cried foul. But most ignored recent evidence of a politically motivated firing of a DOE employee under Obama.

The climate questions were condemned widely by the press, including by non-American media outlets including The Daily Mail which claimed Trump’s team was composing a "hit-list" of Energy Dept workers. Others called it a “witch-hunt” and “intimidation.” In contrast to the minimal coverage primarily in the conservative press and insider DC publications (The Hill, Politico) of Dr. Noelle Metting’s firing.


Liberals still sore over Donald Trump’s electoral victory are bashing the president-elect by any means, including through liberal media outlets.

In the latest volley, left-wing Slate and Vanity Fair both attacked Trump for how he’ll hurt the economy and Americans’ finances a day before Trump was scheduled to deliver an economic speech.


2016 was a crazy year. Americans had ringside seats to the presidential boxing match between Apprentice star Donald Trump, R, and former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, D. Trump won the prize fight in spite of the liberal media acting more like Clinton’s boxing promoter than the referee.

Throughout the tumult, the liberal agenda dominated economic and business news from media spin of the Dakota Access Pipeline fight, to repeatedly ignoring weak economic data, and failing to expose the economic damage of Castro’s communism.


If you scream loud and long enough for a liberal cause, the media listen. Pipeline opponents dominated network reporting of the Obama administration’s decision to refuse permission for a section of the Dakota Access Pipeline (DAPL).

#NoDAPL Protesters cheered the Army Corps of Engineers’ Dec. 4, announcement that it would not grant an easement allowing construction of the pipeline across Lake Oahe and the Missouri River, near the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation. None of the reports pointed out that the Corps. granted permission for the crossing in July 2016.


Liberals are struggling with the idea that elections have consequences. Sometimes those consequences include repealing regulations and policies of the previous administration.

For the past eight years, Obama and liberal environmentalists claimed that harsh regulations were essential to combat disastrous amounts of global warming. But now that Donald Trump is president-elect, Media groups, from left-wing nonprofits like Mother Jones and Grist, to for-profit outlets like The New York Times and Newsweek, are petrified for the environment.


Peaceful protest is a protected right in America. Trespassing on private property, tire slashing, damaging equipment, arson, Molotov cocktail-throwing and shooting at police are not acts of protest. They are crimes. Even eco-terrorism. Yet, the network news media sympathetically covered the “activists,” “protesters” and “demonstrators” in North Dakota opposing completion of the Dakota Access oil Pipeline (DAPL) — even as they grew violent.


Former California governor, actor and anti-carbon crusader Arnold Schwarzenegger issued some harsh words for anyone who doesn’t want the Environmental Protection Agency regulating carbon dioxide.

In a recently posted video, the Terminator star said, “Some politicians even want to shut down the EPA’s ability to regulate carbon! I would like to strap their mouth to an exhaust pipe of a truck, turn on the engine and let’s see how long it would take for them to tap out.”


Although many on the left wanted climate change to have a higher profile in the 2016 presidential race, one Washington Post editor claimed the heated campaign “could change the climate debate for the better.”

Washington Post Digital Opinions Editor James Downie repeated a series of climate alarmist claims and complained Hillary Clinton’s stated climate policy isn’t sufficient. But he found a silver lining in the way journalists chose to abandon objectivity this campaign season.


NBC executives had planned to use video of the vulgar discussion between Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump and Billy Bush to influence the election.

TMZ reported on Oct. 12, that NBC executives knew of the existence of this taped conversation before the The Washington Post released it to the public — although they’ve claimed to only know about it for about a week. The actual incident dates back to 2005.


While many activists fighting the Dakota Access oil pipeline have been exposed and even arrested for trespassing on the property, Climate Direct Action turned to criminal eco-terrorism in “solidarity” on Oct. 11.

Climate change activists disrupted crude oil flowing through multiple pipelines by tampering with pipelines in four states simultaneously, according to Reuters. Enbridge Inc. pipelines in Minnesota had to be temporarily shut down as well as Spectra Energy’s Express Pipeline in Montana.


There was major negative economic news on Oct. 4, when the International Monetary Fund released its latest World Economic Outlook, but the broadcast networks paid no attention that night. The group issued new estimates for global economic growth and particular countries. Bloomberg reported that “forecasts for U.S. growth were cut to 1.6 percent this year and 2.2 percent in 2017.”


Actor Leonardo DiCaprio sat on the White House lawn on Oct. 3, and proclaimed that anyone who doesn’t not believe in climate change “should not be allowed to hold public office.”

“The scientific consensus is in and the argument is now over, if you do not believe in climate change, you do not believe in facts or in science or empirical truths and therefore, in my humble opinion, should not be allowed to hold public office,” DiCaprio stated at the White House South By South Lawn (SXSL) event.


The first presidential debate pitting Donald Trump against Hillary Clinton on Sept. 26, kicked off with the topic “achieving prosperity.” Not that you’d ever really know it from the questions asked by moderator Lester Holt. Multiple polls show that the economy is foremost in voters minds, but the economic segment of the debate failed to dive deep into the state of the U.S. economy. And the tough economic questions were from one side: the left.


Energy & Environmental Legal Institute released new documentation showing what it called “collusion” between the Environmental Protection Agency, environmentalist groups and even reporters.

FOIA-ed emails obtained by E&E Legal, the Competitive Enterprise Institute and Jeb Harmon showed that the EPA’s Michael Goo used a private email account to correspond with individuals about EPA business. People contacting him through his private emails included lobbyists, eco-groups like the Sierra Club, Clean Air Task Force and National Resources Defense Council and journalists.

“Dozens of emails leave no doubt that moving select correspondence about EPA-related business to non-official email accounts was an understood, deliberate and widespread practice in the Obama EPA,” the report compiled by attorney Chris Horner stated.


Think old media are biased? New media is vying to be worse. Spotify, the streaming music service with 100 million active users, is rolling out an election issues video series targeting millennials through a partnership with Mic. And from the start it is leaning left. The Clarify video series will address a number of subjects like student debt, gun control, the economy and civil rights, according to Billboard.com.


The Dakota Access pipeline has attracted a host of liberal protesters including Black Lives Matter, in addition to the many Native American groups upset by the pipeline’s proximity to their lands. Over Labor Day weekend, protesters trespassed by entering the construction area, confronted security — some even threw rocks at security — and vandalized equipment.