On Wednesday's Full Frontal show on TBS, liberal comedian Samantha Bee tore into House Speaker Paul Ryan during the show's opening monologue, calling him "f---ing horrible," a "f---ing coward," and declaring that "he has always been a bad person" in response to the Wisconsin Republican announcing his retirement.



Monday’s network evening newscasts offered continuing coverage on the July 1 murder of a San Francisco woman allegedly at the hands of an illegal immigrant, but it was NBC Nightly News that shamelessly used the occasion to blast "the new Todd Akin" in Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump for having “seized upon” the story to promote his stance on illegal immigration as the GOP is “desperate to win Latino voters.”



NPR loves to label individuals and groups—but not all the time. They usually want listeners to know who Republicans are, as they did incessantly last year with GOP Senate candidate Todd Akin. A piece about the North Carolina General Assembly righting an old wrong on the July 25 All Things Considered evening news show took a different approach, with reporter Julie Rose entirely omitting party designations.

North Carolina, like many other states, had an involuntary eugenics-based sterilization program for most of the 1900s. The program finally stopped in 1974. In the four intervening decades, the state did nothing to compensate victims. Last week, that changed with the passage of a bill establishing a fund for victims.



CNN tarred the Romney campaign with Todd Akin's infamous "legitimate rape" comment, and now it is trying to do the same to Rep. Trent Franks (R-Ariz.) for making a much less controversial remark on rape and pregnancy.

Franks, referring to a bill that would ban abortions after 20 weeks, and arguing that no exception should be made for pregnancies from rape, claimed that "the incidents of rape resulting in pregnancy are very low." He clarified that the number of those cases was low and should not be the focus of the debate, but Democrats (and the media) pounced and lampooned him for saying that.



When the guilty verdict was handed down in the Steubenville, Ohio rape trial, on Sunday, CNN's Candy Crowley and Poppy Harlow painted the convicted rapists in sympathetic tones. Harlow emoted: "I've never experienced anything like it, Candy. It was incredibly emotional -- incredibly difficult even for an outsider like me to watch what happened as these two young men that had such promising futures, star football players, very good students, literally watched as they believe their life fell apart."

Crowley pondered: "You know, Paul [Callan], a 16-year-old now just sobbing in court, regardless of what big football players they are, still sound like 16 year olds. The other one, 17. A 16-year-old victim. The thing is, when you listen to it and you realize that they could stay until they're 21, they are going to get credit for time served. What's the lasting effect, though, on two young men being found guilty in juvenile court of rape, essentially?"

The initial sympathetic verdict coverage given to actual rapists stood in stark contrast to the harsher treatment CNN gave to the admittedly ignorant and offensive comments about rape, made by GOP candidate Todd Akin, during the 2012 campaign. (video after the jump)



Sitting in on Thursday's Randi Rhodes show, Nicole Sandler was reviewing 2012 and “all the rapey guys” like Senate candidates like Todd Akin and Richard Mourdock. “You could say they raped themselves...because they got all rapey on us.” In January, Sandler added, “Frothy Rick Santorum” said the same thing to Piers Morgan on CNN, that a baby, even “horribly created,” is a “gift of human life.”  Left out of all this comedy? That it was the liberal Morgans and the stack-decking moderators who kept asking the rape questions to embarrass politicians who want to defend the unborn.

Then she turned her attack to “The disgrace to the female gender, Dana Loesch." She played a clip of Loesch saying that women complaining about a trans-vaginal probe had already been well, probed in their consensual sexual activity. This sent Sandler over the edge, complaining that perhaps Dana Loesch, a married woman and mother, has never had sex: 



As NewsBusters readers know, one of my favorite things to do on Saturday is expose the stunning ignorance of HBO's Bill Maher.

The Real Time host didn't let me down Friday actually saying during his prepared opening monologue that Indiana's Richard Mourdock lost his senate bid Tuesday to - wait for it! - "Elizabeth Warren up in Massachusetts" (video follows with transcript and commentary):



Cher and Kathy Griffin on Friday released a campaign video accusing Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney of wanting to turn back time on women’s rights.

I guess these two brainiacs haven’t gotten the message that the White House’s phony Republican war on women has failed and failed badly (video follows with transcribed highlights and commentary):



AP reporter Andrew Taylor wrote up one of those teasing narratives Tuesday – the kind where he says, gee the GOP could have the Senate majority if it hadn’t managed to nominate Tea Party wackos that were successfully ripped down by harsh national press coverage.

Well, there was no actual reference to the press or its anti-Tea Party aggression. There are only “flawed, gaffe-prone nominees,” and no mention of who in the political world decides what a “gaffe” is and how the media's gaffe patrol never seems to locate them in the vicinity of Joe Biden. Taylor began his “bizarre GOP missteps” narrative this way:



Missouri's Republican senatorial candidate Todd Akin compared opponent Claire McCaskill (D-Miss.) to a dog Saturday.

Appearing at a fundraiser in Springfield, Akin said, "She goes to Washington, D.C., and it’s a little bit like, you know, one of those dogs, you know - ‘fetch.’”



So much for the idea that the children of public figures are off limits when it comes to criticism...

San Francisco Chronicle columnist Mark Morford best known to the world for turning himself into a laughingstock four years ago for his inadvertently hilarious suggestion that Barack Obama is some sort of spiritually attuned Lightworker, has demonstrated in his most recent column that he has no problem with wallowing in the spiritual sewer. Morford does not merely mock the daughters of Missouri Senate candidate Todd Akin but seems absolutely obsessed in attempting to make them as much the objects of ridicule that he has already become. Read Morford's insane rantings about them and you get the idea that perhaps a psychiatric intervention in the form of restraint straps is needed here:



CBS This Morning anchor Charlie Rose on Tuesday pestered Rick Santorum about Todd Akin and tried to goad the former Republican presidential candidate into bashing Mitt Romney. Highlighting Akin and his gaffe about rape, Rose needled, "What does that say to you? Does that say something about the party and its image?"

Rose followed up by pushing the former senator, who will be speaking at the Republican convention. The host demanded to know the "the differences today between Rick Santorum and the governor, in terms of how you see the world and how you see the particular issues that he will address?" After Santorum side-stepped the question, choosing to attack the President, Rose badgered, "Speak to the differences you have with [Romney] coming into this convention."