PBS’s FRONTLINE episode “The Abortion Divide,” an update of a piece by Mark Obenhaus that examined abortion politics in Pennsylvania in 1983, aired on April 23. The film bounced back and forth between the 1980s and today, ranging from the inner city of Philadelphia to the suburbs and recording five separate abortion procedures. But one crucial topic was conspicuously missing: the crimes of Dr. Kermit Gosnell.



“Trump Court Pick Causes Stir With Abortion View,” in Wednesday’s New York Times contained a hefty dose of extraneous “conservative” labeling: 12 “conservative” labels in non-quoted material in a 1,200-word story. Meanwhile, Times science reporter Denise Grady tried to quell any qualms from the paper’s liberal readership under the soothing headline: “‘Executing Babies’: Here Are the Facts Behind Trump’s Misleading Abortion Tweet -- Infants are rarely born alive after abortion procedures, and if they are, doctors do not kill them.”



The New York Times ran an op-ed on February 26 with the provocative title “I Didn’t Kill My Baby.” However, the reader quickly learns that, although the contention in the title is correct, there’s no reason for it to be asserted other than to muddy the waters between abortion and an infant dying of natural causes, which are two completely different things morally, ethically, and legally.



The weekend editions of Fox and Friends on Fox News Channel spent a substantial amount of time highlighting the "outcry" over an "extreme' new law recently signed by New York Democratic Governor Andrew Cuomo that would allow abortions to be performed all the way up until right before birth. The weekend anchors even hosted an OB/GYN who argued that an abortion to save a woman's life would never be necessary in the third trimester as he also recalled receiving threats since he spoke out on the issue.



On October 12, the movie Gosnell: The Trial of America’s Biggest Serial Killer debuted in 673 theaters on October 12, and grossed $1.2 million in its first weekend.  But The Washington Post offered no review for its debut, although it was showing in eight Virginia theaters and six in Maryland. The New York Times offered reviews of 15 new movies that day, but not the pro-life one. The only major paper that reviewed it, the Los Angeles Times, lamented it had "a sanctimonious tone that’s anything but subtle.”



Gosnell works on so many levels it’s hard to count them all. The film tackles one of the most emotional subjects in our culture – abortion – with grace and care. The screenplay packs a specific point of view but leaves the soapbox storytelling off the frame. We’re gripped by a narrative that could chase away those with weak stomachs.



Arguably a contributing factor to the continuation of abortion is that it is performed out of sight and thus, out of many minds. A film about one of the worst practitioners of abortion, Kermit Gosnell, opens October 12 in at least 600 theaters. Gosnell is the Philadelphia abortionist sentenced in 2013 to life in prison without parole. The film is based on trial transcripts and police records.



“Gosnell: The Trial of America's Biggest Serial Killer” debuts in theaters nationwide on Oct. 12. I do believe this groundbreaking film by indie producers Phelim McAleer and Ann McElhinney is the most important movie in America right now — a true-life saga of good vs. evil, deadly medical malpractice, systemic government malfeasance and cultural apathy toward the most vulnerable members of our society.



Actor Dean Cain calls himself “pro-choice,” but that didn’t stop him starring in an upcoming film revealing the horror story of Philadelphia abortionist Kermit Gosnell. Cain stars as Detective James “Woody” Wood in Gosnell: The Trial of America's Biggest Serial Killer, which opens in as many as 750 theaters October 12. MRC Culture interviewed Cain Sept. 21 at Family Research Council’s 2018 Values Voter Summit. 



The new trailer for Gosnell teases the horror story of a murderous abortionist and his trial – including scenes of empty media seats in the courtroom. It’s right. I know because I was there. The trial of Philadelphia abortionist Kermit Gosnell, in which witnesses described baby abortion survivors “swimming" in toilets “to get out,” attracted a mere 12 – 15 reporters (many of whom, I noticed, were local). Only after 56 days did all three broadcast networks report on Gosnell. But the story is about to garner a new wave of attention with GVN Releasing opening the film, Gosnell: The Trial of America's Biggest Serial Killer, to as many as 750 theaters October 12.



For a summer installment of the entertainment industry’s winners and losers, entries include a successful sequel to a hit Pixar movie having libertarian undertones, Rob Reiner’s latest liberal flop, and a kids’ cartoon of all things joining the grievance industry. And skip down below the first review to avoid spoilers regarding the plot of Incredibles 2!



A former abortion worker is sharing her testimony, from storing aborted babies in milk jugs to learning to sleep in the dark again, in order to tell others like her: “get out.” Her story focuses on one of the most-underreported major crimes in years.