Given the ongoing anti-Trump onslaught in late-night television, it should come as no surprise that Republicans and Democrats have very different perspectives on how political content is used in those  “comedy” shows, whether they’re on the mainstream networks or cable TV. According to a recent survey, 54 percent of Democrats said they watch late-night talk shows, compared to 26 percent of Republicans. Also, Democrats were far more likely than those in the GOP to say they like it when late-night hosts discuss politics or personal political views.



Dana Carvey on Monday wondered whether Donald Trump will get credit if the efforts to de-nuclearize North Korea are successful. Talking to Conan O’Brien on TBS, he even joked about a Nobel Prize: “As far as Trump is concerned, if he solves the thing in thing in North Korea... are we going to give him the Nobel Peace Prize?  I mean, we’d have to, right?” 



Comedian Dana Carvey discussed politics and comedy with Carl Koslowski on his podcast Kozversations. “Because of the sensitivity of having an African-American president, which is completely understandable...It took a while to find a way to satirize our president," Carvey told Kozlowski. He admitted it took time to figure out how to satirize Obama. “We were all getting to know him as a country.”

The host asked about his appearance at a Reagan Library event and whether he performs at benefits for both sides. Carvey said actor-activist Gary Sinise asked him to appear, and insisted he didn't change his jokes in any way. Then he turned to how it's "disturbing" that people on the left can't take a joke like conservatives can, and people are afraid to offend "the PC snake."



Former Saturday Night Live co-workers Dennis Miller and Dana Carvey are touring together this summer. On Sunday, The Washington Post published an interview with Carvey as the two head to the Kennedy Center in the nation’s capital for a show on July 12.

While Miller now delights the right with a radio show and humorous appearances on Fox News, Carvey claims “I ride both sides.” But it became clear he doesn’t mock Barack Obama, because somehow he’s so much more serious than our other presidents and presidential candidates:



Friday’s Wall Street Journal tackled the issue of joking about the candidates – especially how hard comedians have found it to mock President Obama. Four years ago, "you couldn't tell jokes about Obama," said the leftist political humorist Will Durst. "You couldn't even see him—the halo was too bright."

"Since I've been doing this, going back to the '70s, I don't remember two contenders for the presidency who had fewer handles for comedy between them," said Saturday Night Live writer Jim Downey, but even now, Obama is too perfect (?) for humorists:



While filling in as the host of Dennis Miller's nationally syndicated radio show last week, Jon Levitz and his guest, fellow comic Dana Carvey, discussed why people get so upset at Obama jokes, noting that liberals label such material as. "hate speech" and, therefore, is unworthy of any further consideration.

Carvey criticized the “sensitivity” people have when jokes are told regarding President Barack Obama and that affect freedom of speech as “scary and dangerous.”



Appearing as a guest on Friday's The Tonight Show on NBC, former Saturday Night Live cast member Dana Carvey demonstrated the tendency of comedians to have fun with President Obama in a fashion that builds him up while poking fun at Republicans in a way that tears them down.

When asked by host Jay Leno about the presidential election, Carvey remarked that Obama is "like a Zen master of speaking" before mocking Mitt Romney's speaking ability:



Update 11-25 8:20 AM: Morning Joe Makes SNL References -- see discussion at foot.

Call it "The Wild 'n Crazy Guy–Billionaire Style."  Maria Bartiromo's interview of Saudi Prince Alwaleed, the largest shareholder of Citigroup, is literally a Saturday Night Live skit waiting—begging—to happen.

CNBC's Bartiromo conducted the interview by remote this afternoon. When the camera went to the prince in Riyadh, you might have expected to find him in a TV studio, or perhaps in his business office, maybe even in one of his palace rooms.  But no, there he was sitting outdoors, apparently by his stables, with seated camels and sleek horses very visible in the background.   And rather than being attired in business or traditional Saudi dress, the Prince was duded up with an open collar, tinted glasses and a scarf warding off the desert's cool night air.  He could be seen occasionally fingering what appeared to be golden worry beads.

View video here.