"Dunn verdict renews call for gun reform" blares the teaser headline for the number one item in the lightbox at MSNBC.com.

The corresponding story by Michele Richinick was front-loaded with calls from liberal activists to exploit the outcome of a murder trial to promote an effort to repeal Florida's Stand Your Ground law, which was not even invoked as a defense in the recently-concluded trial of Michael Dunn (emphasis mine):



On the Monday night edition of All In, Chris Hayes featured a segment decrying what he considered a racially-motivated overzealous prosecution of Marissa Alexander, an African-American Florida woman who was sentenced to 20 years in prison after firing a warning shot in the vicinity of her estranged husband, with whom she was having a dispute. [Link to the audio here]

Hayes hosted a panel which included Rep. Corrine Brown (D-Fla.) to discuss the story, and its implications when compared against the outcome of the Zimmerman case. Rep. Brown passionately exclaimed that this case showed “institutional racism” in the justice system. Hayes and the panel agreed with Brown about her opinion that Alexander had been overcharged for her crime and called into question the legitimacy of “mandatory minimum” laws, which require a preset minimum sentence if convicted of certain crimes. But according to an Associated Press report, the story is a lot more complex than that.