A couple of weeks ago I heard the National Symphony perform Shostakovich’s symphony commemorating war and revolution, his Symphony 11. There was not much lyricism to it, not even a dulcet tune one could leave the symphony hall whistling. It was all ominous rumbling and groaning, with the tympani madly thundering away. Nonetheless, it was very affecting. After all, this 1957 work was about Russia on the road to the Bolshevik Revolution and the horrors of Lenin, then Stalin, his purges and Gulag, followed by the carnage of World War II. Rumble on. Rumble on.

 



The MRC’s Tim Graham joined Newsmax TV on Tuesday night with host Steve Malzberg to elaborate on the MRC’s Notable Quotables Worst of the Worst 2015 winners, including overall winner Melissa Harris-Perry of MSNBC declaring on October 25 that the term “hard worker” has racist connotations.



Making his television debut on the December 18 edition of One American News Network’s Tipping Point, NewsBusters managing editor Ken Shepherd promoted the 2015 winners of the Notable Quotable’s Worst of the Worst and the overall winner of MSNBC’s Melissa Harris-Perry scolding guest Alfonso Aguilar on October 25 for using the term “hard worker” because it’s racist.



On Saturday morning, MRC Research Director Rich Noyes joined co-host Tucker Carlson on the Fox News Channel’s Fox & Friends to highlight a few winners from the 2015 edition of Notable Quotable’s Worst of the Worst, including overall winner MSNBC’s Melissa Harris-Perry for her diatribe about the term “hard worker” having racist connotations. 



During an appearance on CNN’s Reliable Sources on Sunday, Clinton Cash author Peter Schweizer blasted ABC’s George Stephanopoulos for failing to disclose $75,000 worth of donations to the Clinton Foundation. Speaking to Brian Stelter, Schweizer maintained that after his interview with the ABC anchor that he "thought he was simply asking tough questions. Now I think the revelations that have come out put the interview at least in my mind in a totally different context.”



Speaking with Megyn Kelly on Thursday’s Kelly File, Fox News Channel’s MediaBuzz host Howard Kurtz slammed ABC News chief anchor George Stephanopoulos for committing an “unthinkable” blunder in making previously disclosed donations totaling $75,000 to the Clinton Foundation that’s “so severe that it really threatens to undo” his record over “his 18 years at ABC News.” When asked by Kelly just “how bad is” this scandal, Kurtz began by reminding viewers that it’s “[s]uch a bombshell that George Stephanopoulos has now had to withdraw as ABC's moderator in the Republican presidential debate next year.” 



A fiery Joe Scarborough on Tuesday denounced the media's double standard when it comes to investigating the scandal engulfing the Clinton Foundation's financial dealings. An angry Scarborough erupted "The Clintons have made $150 million over the past decade because of contacts they made during public service!" He described the typical journalist reaction as "Let's bow down before Bill and Hillary, because if we ask the same questions of them that we ask of every other politician, then oh, my God! We have crossed a line!" 



In an interview with Clinton Cash author Peter Schweizer on Monday's NBC Today about the scandal swirling around the Clinton Foundation, co-host Savannah Guthrie worried about the political fallout for Hillary Clinton: "Before we get into some of the details, let's put it bluntly. Are you hoping that this book and the issues you raise in it torpedo her candidacy?" And: "A lot of your critics say, 'Look, you are a conservative and that this is a right-wing hit job.' Are you really claiming to be neutral here?"



On Sunday’s This Week, ABC’s George Stephanopoulos interviewed Peter Schweizer, author of Clinton Cash, and repeatedly badgered his guest about the accuracy of his book and chose to focus on Democratic attacks against the author. During the heated discussion, Stephanopoulos hyped how Democrats accuse Schweizer of having a “partisan interest. They say you used to work for President Bush as a speech writer. You are funded by the Koch brothers.” Stephanopoulos never appeared interested in the actual substance of Schweizer’s book.



On the Thursday edition of NBC’s Late Night, host Seth Meyers jumped aboard the Clinton campaign’s push to discredit the upcoming book Clinton Cash by Peter Schweizer by mocking Schweizer’s background, previous book titles, and chalking the book up to be nothing more than the latest work from “the cottage industry of anti-Clinton books that come out every year.”



Even by James Carville standards, this was bizarre. Toward the end of his appearance on Ed Schultz's show today, Carville called Clinton Cash author Peter Schweizer "this anti-Disney, gay bike bar Glenn Beck or whatever this guy is."

Maybe Carville will come back and explain what he meant.  It's true that Schweizer was a contributor to one of Beck's books.  And Schweizer is the author of "Disney Betrayed," which criticizes the company for various things including sponsoring "Gay Days" at their parks.  But a casual viewer might well have come away with an entirely different understanding of what Carville was implying. Note also the way Carville's voice jumps by a couple of octaves when asked what advice he'd give Hillary's handlers.  Jittery, James?



CNN's Chris Cuomo did his best to downplay the emerging scandals about the Clinton Foundation on Thursday's New Day. Cuomo asserted that "the Clinton book was widely dismissed – about the money that goes into the CGI [Clinton Global Initiative]. And then...the left is pushing back hard on this book – saying, there's nothing there." He later underlined that the "examples that have come out so far" in the New York Times' coverage of the story were "not that impressive."