On Wednesday’s Morning Joe, while discussing Roy Moore’s victory in the Republican Alabama Senate primary, Joe Scarborough and Jon Meacham mused about the possibility of a ‘chaotic,’ ‘left-wing,’ ‘populist’ political movement coming about in the future in response to politicians like Moore. In the process, everyone on the panel apparently forgot about the existence of Antifa, Black Lives Matter, or even the insurgent candidacy of Bernie Sanders last year in the Democratic presidential primaries.



Phew! That was close. It looked for a moment that Americans might be denied the trenchant political observations of Lady Gaga during the Super Bowl halftime show. The Huffington Post had reported that the NFL ordered Gaga to shut up and sing.



To say that cops and rappers have a tense relationship would be an understatement.

Long before the #BlackLivesMatter movement took hold, many rappers have been singing about police run-ins, alleged “police brutality,” and their overall hatred and distrust of the “system.” Using their talent and fame, stars like Nicki Minaj, Kendrick Lamar and Jay Z have recently bolstered the BLM movement by highlighting current events in their songs and social media. For example, on July 8, Minaj tweeted: “May the spirit of Malcolm X be reborn… for such a time as this.” Lamar’s song “Alright” from his 2015 album “To Pimp a Butterfly” included the words: “And we hate Popo, wanna kill us dead in the street for sure.”



Early this week, in an MSNBC interview, Tavis Smiley said that there's far too much attention being paid to "cop killers" and not enough to "killer cops."

Then, in a Tuesday USA Today column, he cast his sympathetic lot with Gavin Long, who killed three Baton Rouge police offices on Sunday before a police sharpshooter killed him. Smiley told readers that we should "Listen to the Baton Rouge police killer." Later in the week, he interviewed Corine Woodley, Long's mother, on his PBS show. Woodley's own words indicated that what caused her son to snap was that he bought into both the lies of the violent Black Lives Matter movement and the left's obsession with "the one percent."



Jorge Ramos' latest column clarifies and brightens a formerly blurry line between journalism and advocacy; between neutrality and partisanship, tacitly endorsing Hillary Clinton for President in the process.



In the wee hours of Tuesday morning during CNN Tonight with Don Lemon, the panel discussion descended into borderline chaos as guests and the host engaged in a wild shouting match. It all started when the topic of Mayor Rudy Giuliani’s convention speech was brought up. “Rudy Giuliani's speech tonight was rousing. It was. It was the definition of rousing,” stated Black Lives Matter supporter Bakari Sellers, “But it was also the definition of divisive.”



Less than 24 hours after the highly contentious interview between CNN’s Don Lemon and Milwaukee County Sheriff David Clark, CNN Host Erin Burnett demanded to know if Donald Trump agreed with him. “He’s [Sheriff David Clarke] going to be speaking tonight. He blames black lives matter for these tragedies against police. Does Donald Trump condone that,” Burnett asked to a Trump supporter on her OutFront panel. 



On Sunday's Meet the Press on NBC, former Nightly News anchor Tom Brokaw seemed bewildered and frustrated that race relations in the U.S. haven't improved as much as he hoped they would by now.

Brokaw didn't consider his own network's significant and largely dishonest contribution to this situation during the past nearly 11 years.



Adam Ragusea, writing at Slate.com, believes that the word "terrorist" has become "uselessly arbitrary and loaded," because it "has acquired a powerful religious—and specifically Islamic—connotation" that "is substantively consequential."

As a result, Ragusea believes that the Associated Press, whose Stylebook sadly exerts nearly ironclad control over language used in U.S. establishment press journalism, should follow the lead of Reuters and stop using that word. Oh, and based on looking at what Reuters shamefully did with little fanfare, the word "terrorism" also needs to go.



Only a week after returning to the airwaves after deciding that even for a liberal she was too young to retire in her mid-50s, Randi Rhodes has staked a firm claim on the churlish end of left-wing commentary.

The ex-Air America Radio host, now venting via podcasts and a Kickstarter-funded website, let loose last week with what those deemed more balanced would consider a peculiar irritation.



The Memphis Commercial Appeal died as a genuine newspaper on July 12.

Its journalistic pulse stopped when its editor, Louis Graham, apologized for the paper's three-word front-page headline after the July 7 race-motivated massacre of five Dallas policemen, which read: "Gunman Targeted Whites."



New York Times former editorial page editor Andrew Rosenthal, perhaps the most self-satisfied liberal on a Times staff that’s not exactly running short of them, was in rare form on the eve of the Republican Convention in Cleveland, going after multiple “racist” and bigoted GOP targets and comparing them to various notorious dictators.