Liberal journalists don’t like conservatives bringing up religion and faith, but it’s apparently okay for them to insist God supports Democratic political opinions. On December 4, 2013, then-MSNBC host Ed Schultz weighed in on what God thinks about ObamaCare: “I’ll tell you what I think God thinks of the Affordable Care Act. It’s a big ‘amen.’” 



Remember back when journalists were skeptical of independent investigations into presidents? In the days when Ken Starr was looking into Bill Clinton, journalists weren’t so supportive. On November 25, 1998, 20/20's Diane Sawyer grilled Starr, saying of the Starr Report: “This has been called demented pornography, pornography for puritans.” 



Conservatives, you can blame them for everything. On the 50th anniversary of the assassination of John F. Kennedy, the Washington Post featured an essay by University of Texas journalism professor Bill Minutaglio blaming the Tea Party for killing of JFK. He offered this bizarre, nutty take: “To find the very roots of the Tea Party of 2013, just go back to downtown Dallis in 1963, back to the months leading up to the Kennedy assassination.” 



Before journalists were fantasizing about having sex with Barack Obama, they were musing about sex with another Democrat, Bill Clinton. On November 16, 1992, Time Senior Writer Walter Shapiro cheered that “for the first time in more than 30 years the nation has elected a President with sex appeal.” 



It’s been eight years since Barack Obama was elected. So, you may be forgiven forgetting just how effusive journalists were towards the Democrat on election night. On the November 5, 2008 Good Morning America (the day after), Bill Weir gushed over Obama’s election: “Last night was transcendent.... Voices from around the world shouted the greatness of America.” 



Journalists have been bashing conservative Supreme Court judges for decades. Even after Clarence Thomas was confirmed, reporters never liked him much. On November 2, 2007, Jeffrey Toobin sneered that Thomas is “angry,” “bitter,” and “isolated.” 



As readers of This Week in Media Bias History know, journalists aren’t good at hiding their partisan agenda. Yet, there’s some subjects they don’t want to take a stand on. For instance: Whether the terrorist attack on the Pentagon was wrong. ABC News President David Westin on October 23, 2001 mused, “The Pentagon as a legitimate target? I actually don’t have an opinion on that.” Talking to Columbia University journalism students, he lectured, “As a journalist, I feel strongly that’s something that I should not be taking a position on.” 



Remember when Chris Matthews fantasized about the death of Rush Limbaugh? Describing the conservative radio host as a James Bond villain, Matthews on October 13, 2009 fumed, “Rush Limbaugh is looking more and more like Mr. Big, and at some point somebody's going to jam a CO2 pellet into his head and he's going to explode like a giant blimp.” 



Do these people hear themselves when they talk? On October 11, 2002, ABC’s Barbara Walters offered this bizarre validation of Fidel Castro’s dictatorship: “If literacy alone were the yardstick, Cuba would rank as one of the freest nations on Earth.” Of course, if your yardstick for freedom is freedom, Cuba doesn’t do so well. 



No comparison is too extreme for liberals who hate Rush Limbaugh. On October 5, 2003, CBS Sunday Morning reporter Nancy Giles referred to the conservative radio star as “edgy.” She added, “Hitler would have killed in talk radio. He was edgy, too.” 



Then-Today co-host Katie Couric was SO excited about the opportunity to bash Ronald Reagan that she mangled a statement by biographer Edmund Morris. Couric opened the September 27, 1999 Today with this: “Good Morning. The Gipper was an airhead!” Two days later, Morris shot this down: “Oh, good God no! He was a very bright man.” 



CNN founder Ted Turner doesn’t think much of conservatives, but he’s got a blind spot to the atrocities in North Korea. On September 19, 2005, Turner appeared on CNN’s Situation Room and talked about his visit to the despotic country. He seemed to excuse the regime, saying, “I saw a lot of people over there. They were thin and they were riding bicycles instead of cars, but... I didn’t see any brutality.”