New York Times writer Amanda Hess issued surprise criticism of the media’s coverage of Bill Clinton’s sex scandals in her review of The Clinton Affair, A&E’s six-part mini-series on Bill Clinton’s scandal over White House intern Monica Lewinsky. Hess argued that the women who accused the former president of sexual harassment were unjustly mocked and shunned by the mainstream press: “Paula Jones Re-emerges In New Light – A time to listen to the women of the Bill Clinton scandals.” It’s sound advice from Hess, but 20 years too late for the partisan New York Times, which dismissed Juanita Broaddrick’s credible allegations of rape against Clinton as “toxic waste.



All the national journalists acting outraged this week that President Trump would mock the holes in the testimony of Christine Blasey Ford always forget that Bill Clinton's accusers were slashed by the "mainstream" press. Let's recall when Paula Jones sued President Clinton for sexual harassment in 1994.



The news media’s obviously insatiable appetite for scandal news surrounding Republican President Donald Trump is sharply at odds with their aversion to covering such stories about Democratic President Bill Clinton two decades ago. From March 7 through March 25, the ABC, CBS and NBC evening newscasts aired 23 reports about various allegations involving President Trump, totaling 40 minutes of airtime. None of Clinton's accusers ever had that kind of media attention lavished on their claims.



Donald Trump is not the first President to have been accused of sexual improprieties. When President Bill Clinton faced allegations of sexual harassment from Paula Jones and even a rape charge from Juanita Broaddrick, the media looked for reasons not to cover those charges.



On his Fox News show on Thursday night, Sean Hannity underlined an obvious point about the current push to publicize "adult entertainment" providers like Stormy Daniels and Karen McDougal and their allegations of (consensual) adultery with Donald Trump before he was president. The networks were extremely reluctant to publicize allegations of sexual harassment and even sexual assault when the accusers were talking about a Democrat president. Hannity cited Media Research Center data from the 1990s.



Anita Hill to Hollywood’s rescue? That was the theme on the front of Thursday’s Arts page. Cara Buckley’s Hollywood column hailed Clarence Thomas’s accuser as a movie-industry savior in “Can She Fix The Sexual Misconduct Problem?” Meanwhile, Buckley conveniently ignores the fact that the public backed Thomas’s interpretation of events, not Hill’s, and that Hill lost her passion for sexual harassment justice when it was President Bill Clinton under fire (Clinton’s not even mentioned here).



Senator Al Franken, Comedian of Minnesota, was pressed by a majority of Senate Democrats to resign in the wake of a growing pile of accusations of grabbing women in sexual ways. When the number of accusers reached a critical mass,“They turned on one of their party’s most popular figures with stunning swiftness,” reported The Washington Post.     That’s a pretty dramatic decline from the heights just nine months ago, when the Post was preparing him for the White House.



In a Friday radio interview, Hillary Clinton failed to answer a question about her hostile, orchestrated actions against women who credibly accused her husband of sexual harassment and assault during the 1990s. In the process, she accused the alleged victims of "misremembering or misinterpreting history." On Laura Ingraham's Friday evening Fox News show, Paula Jones took strong exception to Mrs. Clinton's nonsense. Naturally, the establishment press hasn't covered what Mrs. Clinton said.



In an age where sexual harassment is dominating the spotlight, has Bill Clinton’s media Day of Reckoning finally arrived? Michelle Goldberg’s op-ed in Tuesday’ New York Times, “I Believe Juanita,” marks another crack in the ice of the liberal media’s cover-up of Clinton’s shameful, and shamefully dismissed, sex-harassment escapades. “Juanita” is Juanita Broaddrick, who in 1999 raised a credible allegation that she was raped by Bill Clinton in 1978, when he was attorney general of Arkansas. Broaddrick was demonized by Democrats and ignored by the media. It's a fairly big step from a fiercely pro-abortion Democratic defender like Goldberg. But she still can’t stop blaming the “right-wing,” as shown in the text box, “Coming to terms with Bill Clinton and right-wing disinformation.”



The New York Times “gender editor” Jessica Bennett made her debut on Tuesday’s front page taking on the sexual harassment allegations against movie mogul Harvey Weinstein in “How Weinstein Scandal Became the Final Straw.” Bennett drew out the history of sexual harassment by political figures coming into the media spotlight (predictably skipping liberal Democratic Sen. Ted Kennedy). She conveniently dated the sexual harassment “tsunami” to the allegations by Anita Hill against conservative Judge Clarence Thomas, publicized in an attempt to sink his Supreme Court nomination. An enormous picture of Hill testifying during the hearings dominated the top of the online version, with 293 words devoted to her, not including the text box and two photo captions. Bennett also included 153 words related to Donald Trump, and let a source call him an “accused sexual predator.”



The long essay-cover story of Newsweek’s September 15 issue by journalist David Friend looked intriguing: Before Trump Was President, Online Sex Videos, Bill Clinton and the Naughty '90s Changed America.” Yet Friend's real targets weren't the Clintons themselves, but the Clintons’ awful right-wing enemies, the embarrassing people who dared accuse him of sexual harassment, and of course, Donald Trump. Anita Hill’s bizarre, unsubstantiated allegations against Clarence Thomas were passed over. Other villains of the piece included Rush Limbaugh and Matt Drudge.



The latest installment of "Stupid Fact Checks" involves the Associated Press, which appears to be determined to deny the truth of any statement, no matter how obviously correct, made by Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump or running mate Mike Pence. At Sunday's second debate, Trump said, "what President Clinton did, he was impeached, he lost his license to practice law, he had to pay an $850,000 fine to one of the women." The AP, as seen after the jump, claims Trump was wrong in saying Clinton "lost" his license: