WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange was arrested, and the front page of Friday’s New York Times featured Scott Shane and Steven Erlanger’s recap of Assange and the effect of his leaking of classified national security information (and Democratic Party secrets) in “A Divisive Prophet of the Public’s Right to Know.” The paper noticed that the tide of sophisticated opinion, once favorable to the Assange, turned in 2016, when Assange’s actions started hurting Democrats and helping the hated Donald Trump. But Shane and Erlanger didn’t make an issue of the glaring political hypocrisy on display or mention the strange new disgust toward Assange coming from the Democratic left.



Now that the liberal media have had a few weeks since Attorney General Bill Barr’s March 24 letter on the Mueller report, liberal journalists and pundits have returned to insisting that Trump-Russian collusion still took place and it affected voters and thus rendered Trump an illegitimate President. Not surprisingly, that nonsense was alive and well on Thursday’s Hardball.



The co-hosts of The View had a heated exchange Thursday over the arrest of Wikileaks founder Julian Assange. When co-host and ABC legal analyst Sunny Hostin made the case that Assange deserved to be protected under the First Amendment, Meghan McCain took her to task, calling her argument, “straight propaganda.”



WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange has been arrested after being kicked out of the Ecuadorian Embassy in London...finally. For media who have spent the fast few years focused on the narrative, Assange was seen as the face that symbolized the threat posed to the United States by Russia, second only to Vladimir Putin. However, it wasn't always that way.



On the Friday broadcast network evening newscasts, ABC’s World News Tonight and NBC Nightly News played the role of faithful PR representatives for the Democratic National Committee (DNC), giving legitimacy and life to a DNC lawsuit seeking to somehow avenge their 2016 election losses and lay blame on, among others, the Russian government. 



Media columnist Jim Rutenberg’s latest New York Times column provided the odd image of a reporter regretting that his colleagues actually covered news, under the neutral headline “Germans Covering Election Await a Trove of Stolen Files.” The Times in 2006 proudly used leaks to cripple anti-terrorist programs put in place by Republican presidents, as well as secret diplomatic cables via the stolen Wikileaks trove. A December 2010 article treated the anti-American oddball Julian Assange and his Wikileaks as a Christmas gift, under the galling title “The Gift of Information.” But publication of the hacked emails from the Democratic National Committee may have hurt Hillary Clinton, so it’s suddenly time to break out the sackcloth and ashes and apologize for actually covering the news.



ABC continued blaming everything but Hillary Clinton for her election loss on Friday’s Good Morning America. Even though it’s been over six months since the election, ABC has continued touting the Democrats’ line that WikiLeaks and Comey caused Trump to win.



After its favored candidate lost the presidential election in shocking fashion, the New York Times is suddenly wide awake to the threat posed by Russia. It devoted 8,000 words and Wednesday’s front page to “Hacking The Democrats – How Russia Honed its Cyberpower and Trained It on an American Election.” The accompanying photo of the filing cabinet broken into during Watergate made it clear the Times considered this a national (and Democratic) tragedy. But the paper has not always been so concerned about the Russia threat, especially when it’s a Republican presidential candidate sounding the alarm. It's tone toward WikiLeaks has also changed since it was gleefully puttting hacked foreign policy memos in print.



During Thursday's edition of the Cable News Network's weeknight Amanpour program, liberal host Christiane Amanpour asked guest Oliver Stone what the well-known film director, screenwriter and producer thought regarding the inclusion of Russia into this year's presidential election.

Stone -- who has generated controversial movies ranging from Midnight Express to the upcoming Snowden “biopic” of the man who released classified documents in 2013 -- called the accusation of Russians hacking into the Democratic National Committee “a great fiction” that disguises “what's really going on.”



Wikileaks Founder Julian Assange doesn’t think that MSNBC or the New York Times would have published the Democratic National Committee e-mails that his website released, messages that showed party collusion with Hillary Clinton. Talking to Fox News’s Megyn Kelly, he explained, “I would like to believe that no organization, no organization, no media organization in the United States would not have published the DNC e-mails.” 



Adjectives matter in politics. The latest release of Hillary Clinton e-mails produced a little embarrassment for CBS News. State Department public-relations chief P.J. Crowley assured Secretary of State Clinton in 2011 that they successfully “planted” questions and suggestions for experts to "balance" a 60 Minutes interview segment by Steve Kroft with WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange.



Let's assess the winners in losers in American culture for 2013. Our first obvious winner is "Duck Dynasty" and its Phil Robertson. He's a winner for standing by his Christian principles after some inartful remarks about homosexuality.

A&E suspended him and put the usual statement that they are "champions" of the gay agenda -- and proceeded to start running "Duck Dynasty" marathons. Mark Steyn put it just right: the gay-left blacklisters insist "espousing conventional Christian morality, even off-air, is incompatible with American celebrity." Robertson has successfully shattered intolerance of the anti-Christian left.