A verbal brawl erupted on Monday’s The View. After liberal co-hosts Whoopi Goldberg and Joy Behar defended Barack Obama’s bland statement on Fidel Castro's death, token conservative Jedediah Bila slammed it as “nauseating.” Goldberg even hinted that the United States in 2016 could go the way of Cuba in limited freedom of the press. 



In the midst of liberal journalists praising the Fidel Castro dictator it is refreshing to hear a member of the media tell the truth about the murderous dictator. Fox News contributor and Washington Times columnist Mercedes Schlapp told the story of how her father and his compatriots were treated in Castro’s Cuba on Monday’s edition of FBN’s Varney & Company: “The military and the regime took over my father’s businesses, took over his home. My father stood up against the regime and he was thrown into jail for six years. He was a political prisoner for speaking up against the Castro regime. He saw many of his friends die, they were executed by a firing squad.”



How ironic it is that the announced death of Cuban Communist dictator Fidel Castro late Friday night coincides with the U.S. establishment press's obsession with smearing websites which dare to challenge their narratives as Russian-inspired "fake news."

Castro's original rise to power was arguably the product of a spectacularly fake dispatch written nearly six decades ago by reporter Herbert L. Matthews and published in the New York Times.



CBS This Morning co-host Charlie Rose on Monday reported live from Cuba and hyped the dead Fidel Castro as a “revolutionary hero” around the world known for “defiance of the United States.” In his first question to Cubans in Havana, Rose led with this loaded question: “What was the best thing he did for the Cuban people?” 



On Sunday night, ABC and NBC had teams assembled in Cuba to shamefully mourn the death of murderous authoritarian leader Fidel Castro with both newscasts turned to fear-mongering in touting claims the President-elect Donald Trump and not current Cuban leader Raul Castro’s communist regime could harm Cuban lives going forward if he goes back on President Barack Obama’s move to resume ties between the two nations.



It took Univision/Fusion anchor Jorge Ramos all of three seconds to set the tone of the post-Fidel Castro edition of his weekly public affairs shows, Al Punto. With a single sentence, Ramos put the rest of the establishment media to shame.



The New York Times and The Washington Post demonstrated again Sunday their warm feelings about communist dictators when they die. 

The Times headline was “A Revolutionary Who Defied the U.S. and Held Cuba In His Thrall.” The Post headline was slightly more balanced: “Revolutionary remade Cuba: Dictator who defied U.S. was loathed, beloved.” For the Times, Anthony DePalma found a “fiery apostle of revolution,” not a dictator:



During a Sunday filled with liberal media elites praising dead communist dictator Fidel Castrol, CBS’s Face the Nation was no different. CBS consultant Julia Sweig seemed to write off the focus on Castro’s atrocities, “There is the analyst that will say look this guy took power, shutdown speech, put people in prison, had a human rights legacy that was quite challenging and difficult for many people who were on the other end of it.” 



Geraldo Rivera is far from the only member of the U.S. press with what Fox News's Pete Hegseth described Saturday as a "reflexive desire" to see Communist dictator Fidel Castro, whose death was announced Friday night, as a "cult hero." Entire major U.S. news outlets fell prey decades ago.



In the wake of the death of Cuba’s brutal dictator, Fidel Castro, President Barack Obama released a statement that failed to condemn him for his crimes. The statement left NBC’s Meet The Press moderator Chuck Todd perplexed on Sunday, asking The New York Times’ Helene Cooper “Why was it so positive?” Cooper blamed Todd’s confusion on “a very Americano-centric view of Cuba,” and argued that Obama had a more nuanced understanding of Castro.



Following the death of communist butcher Fidel Castro on Black Friday, the Cuban exiles and their descendants took to the streets of Little Havana in Miami, Florida to celebrate the turning point for Cuba. But on NBC’s Sunday Today, reporter Andrea Mitchell glowed about the communist leader and shared her memories of him. “[Castro] was a voracious reader … And very, very aware of everything that was going on, very, very smart and very wedded to his revolutionary ideology,” Mitchell opined from Havana, Cuba. 



In a Saturday morning appearance on Fox & Friends, Geraldo Rivera, who interviewed Fidel Castro in 1977 when he worked at ABC News, mostly defended the Cuban dictator whose death was announced Friday night.

Rivera, while admitting earlier in the five-minute segment that "Communism stinks, we all know that," and that "Communism cannot compete with capitalism," nevertheless insisted in the segment's second half that the "all awful" view of Castro is "simplistic," and that "he will be remembered fondly" by the Cuban people.