Clint Eastwood did it again with his newest film, The 15:17 to Paris. The 87-year-old icon drove liberal critics batty with his 2014 smash American Sniper. Heroism? Sacrifice? All-American values? It’s like garlic to some film critics. They’d rather swoon at films depicting the U.S. Military in an unsavory fashion.



Clint Eastwood understands the cultural zeitgeist better than just about any Hollywood star. His “Dirty Harry” films arrived when the public had had enough of unchecked crime. Eastwood delivered “Unforgiven” just when we were ready to deconstruct the western genre. You don’t stay a star for more than five decades without understanding the culture at large. Yet “Sully” defies our current age.



During a recent interview with Clint Eastwood -- and his son, Scott  -- on the Esquire magazine's website, the popular actor and director criticized the current atmosphere of political correctness, telling writer Michael Hainey that when he was growing up, people could say a lot more and not be called a racist.

When the Cable News Network decided to discuss that topic, one of the panelists chosen to take part was Graham Beckel, an actor and the brother of liberal CNN pundit Bob Beckel, and the person who dominated the discussion by asserting such notions as the concept that Eastwood “transcends political correctness” and people should “just get over it.”



During a lengthy interview with a reporter from the Adweek magazine and website, Bill O'Reilly of the Fox News Channel discussed several topics, including the fact that he will not attend the Republican National Convention in Cleveland July 18-21 because he thinks the event will be “boring.”

When asked why he believes that, the host of the top-rated weeknight news program -- The O'Reilly Factor -- for the past 16 years responded: “Hillary's going to get up there, and she's going to be coronated. Maybe there'll be some Bernie fans, and he'll get his night to speak.” However, he noted "the big story” of both the Republican and Democratic gatherings will be who is selected vice president.



Vice Magazine has posted a long, fawning interview with limousine leftist documentary maker Michael Moore, infamous for his recent Twitter attack on U.S. Navy Seal Chris Kyle. Maintaining the offensiveness, Moore found American Sniper to be a racist "mess" and discredits the heroism of marksmen like Kyle, calling snipers "chicken-shit," saying the U.S. was the bad guy in Iraq. And on his Facebook page, Moore compared his conservative critics to the Islamic terrorists of ISIS.



In an article for Salon, Penn State professor Sophia McClennen claims the box-office blockbuster has “no nuance, no context and no subtlety” and that its director, Clint Eastwood, represents a dark, disturbing feature of the GOP mind-set.”



Edelstein gripes in New York magazine that “the native population are portrayed as invaders of our sacred space instead of vice versa,” and that “the people [Chris] Kyle shoots always represent a ‘savage, despicable evil,’ and the physical and mental cost to other Americans just comes with the territory.”



At this point in George W. Bush's presidency, Hollywood uncorked a barrel of anti-Iraq-war movies, all of them in their varying styles trashing the American military or intelligence agencies as vicious murderers, rapists, and all-around freedom-tramplers. Most were duds because the public wanted nothing to do with those messages. But oh, did the critics love 'em.

In Obama's "fourth quarter," as he calls it, Clint Eastwood has released his movie "American Sniper," starring Bradley Cooper as Chris Kyle, a NAVY Seal who survived four tours of duty in Iraq and was credited with an astonishing 160 confirmed kills. The story ended horribly in 2013, four years after he left the Navy, when he and a friend were shot down at a Texas shooting range. Oh, how the critics hate it.



Former New York Times executive editor Howell Raines (sacked in the 2003 Jayson Blair debacle) provided a positive review Sunday of Washington Post political reporter Dan Balz’s 2012-campaign book “Collision.” Raines claimed Balz was “a fair-minded reporter” in the mold of the late David Broder.

You can’t say the same for Raines, who insists Mitt Romney is “excruciatingly delusional” in assessing what happened last year. Bill Clinton’s convention speech gets “deservedly heroic treatment” from Balz, but somehow, Raines saw Clint Eastwood’s erratic convention speech as a “Monty Python moment,” perhaps one of few times anyone’s ever tried to put Dirty Harry next to Eric Idle in the cultural realm:



One of the greatest scenes in the classic comedy "Caddyshack" is when Rodney Dangerfield mocks Ted Knight for taking too much time teeing off at the first hole.

The folks at the USGA introduced a new public service announcement for this week's U.S. Open that features Arnold Palmer and Clint Eastwood somewhat replaying that marvelous scene.



David Letterman took a vulgar swipe at Clint Eastwood Thursday.

During his monologue on CBS's Late Show, the host played a mock post-election Obama commercial featuring an announcer saying, "Hey Clint - f--k you" (video follows with transcript and commentary):



Clint Eastwood made quite a splash when he spoke at the Republican National Convention in Tampa this summer.

Continuing his ringing endorsement of Mitt Romney on Fox News's Hannity Thursday, the actor/director said, "He is just a perfect guy for the job" (video follows with transcript):