On Tuesday morning, syndicated talk-radio host Chris Plante mocked "National Panhandler Radio" for having some seriously high salaries for a taxpayer-subsidized network that begs for listener donations in pledge drives. Plante cited tweets by Washington Post media reporter Paul Farhi from the latest IRS 990 form for nonprofits revealing the high salaries of NPR stars. Plante marveled first at Weekend Edition Saturday host Scott Simon, who is a one-day-a-week anchor and yet made $479,578 -- a 16 percent pay hike. 



NPR Weekend Edition Saturday welcomed Parkland student leftist David Hogg for an interview, and host Scott Simon offered the typical "how are you coping" and "do you have time to be a teenager" softballs. But when he teed up Hogg to say something political, Hogg was obnoxious.



On National Public Radio on Saturday morning, Weekend Edition anchor Scott Simon interviewed Ed Martin, a pro-Trump author and Republican Party man, reveling in the Donald Trump-Steve Bannon feud. Simon claimed Bannon said the president has "lost it," meaning his mind. He asked Martin if he was "supporting a president who is incapable of being entrusted" with nuclear weapons?



On Saturday morning's Weekend Edition, in the wake of the despicable bombing of the Ariana Grande concert in Manchester, England, NPR host Scott Simon welcomed staunch atheist Richard Dawkins, author of (most notably) The God Delusion, to discuss the role of "religion" in terrorism. Simon tiptoed around singling out one particular religion as the most prone to terrorism in this century.



NPR comes to the news of police shootings ready and willing to feel the pain of “black and brown” people, including the children. On Weekend Edition Saturday, anchor Scott Simon launched into a commentary with the online title “For Students In Tulsa, Pain Frames Conversation About Crutcher.”

Simon shared a viral Facebook post by a teacher in Tulsa at a school attended by a daughter of Terrence Crutcher, who was shot on date. The teacher, Rebecca Lee, worried about “creating an identity crisis in all of our black and brown students. Do I matter? Am I to be feared? Should I live in fear? Am I human?”



NPR.org published an article on Friday headlined “Abdul Sattar Edhi, Known As 'Pakistan's Mother Teresa,' Dies At 88.” Edhi was a Muslim man, not a Catholic nun, so...NPR didn’t run around looking for his harshest critics as they did for Mother Teresa in 1997.

Charity was a "central tenet of Islam," NPR reported this week, but they turned to leftist Christopher Hitchens in 1997 to decry Mother Teresa and her Catholic "enthusiasm for the dignity of poverty as 'Middle Age theology,' a destructive comfort to keep people poor."



On NPR’s Weekend Edition Saturday, the play-down-Islam game was in full swing. The headline online was “Orlando Shooter Update: Few Warning Signs Point To Radicalization.”

NPR anchor Scott Simon said unnamed federal officials were “struck by the fact that the shooter, Omar Mateen, doesn't seem to have exhibited any of the warning signs often associated with radicalization. They're exploring whether Mateen invoked ISIS's name not because he follows that group, but perhaps in hopes of getting more publicity for his attacks.” Because, you know, shooting 100 people wouldn't get  much publicity otherwise.



On Saturday, NPR’s Weekend Edition celebrated atheist author Philip Pullman and the His Dark Materials trilogy he wrote for middle-schoolers, a sort of anti-Narnia series. Anchor Scott Simon celebrated the 20th anniversary of the first book in this trilogy and interviewed Pullman as he sat a BBC studio in Oxford, hinting they have "maybe the mark of real excellence."



In the October 13 edition of Time, they asked radical-left black professor Cornel West if he voted for Obama in 2012, and he said he couldn’t vote for a “war criminal.” NPR promoted this radical leftist on Saturday morning’s Weekend Edition, but in six minutes and 22 seconds, never mentioned the president or the 2014 elections.

This syrupy interview promoting West’s book Black Prophetic Fire ended with anchor Scott Simon utterly failing to notice (again) that the leftist Ferguson narrative of Evil Cop Shoots Gentle Giant is facing a serious clash with facts.



How enthusiastic can NPR be in avoiding the emerging Obama scandals? Try this: So-called “All Things Considered” aired no features on Benghazi or the IRS on Saturday or Sunday. (This excludes on-the-hour news updates.) But they found time for six minutes on the trade in rhino horns.

It was more ridiculous on “Weekend Edition” Saturday and Sunday – they also skipped both. NPR correspondent Michele Kelemen reported on Secretary of State John Kerry for 4 minutes and 22 seconds without a single word about Libya. Somehow the State Department’s Benghazi fiasco wasn’t listed as a “thorny issue” in the Middle East:



This week the Today show is celebrating 60 years of being on the air, and for over 20 of those years the MRC has been documenting the NBC morning show’s liberal agenda. From past anchors like Bryant Gumbel blaming “right wing” talk radio for the Oklahoma City bombing and  Katie Couric trashing Ronald Reagan as an “airhead,” up through current anchor Matt Lauer wondering how Barack Obama would “manage the expectations” of being called “The Messiah,”
MRC analysts have been documenting the worst the show has offered.

The following are 10 of the most obnoxiously liberal examples of Today show bias from the MRC’s archive; for even more bias from the Today show anchors please visit the Profile in Bias pages of Gumbel, Couric, Lauer, Meredith Vieira and Ann Curry. (Top 10 Video Countdown after the jump)



NPR is clearly relishing the Murdoch newspapers scandal in Britain. Its Weekend Edition headline on Saturday was "News Corp. Dynasty Crumbles From the Top Down." Anchor Scott Simon interviewed Financial Times columnist Clive Crook and asked if the scandal will cause sell-offs: "How big a dent that they represent in his holdings and his influence?...Can you foresee them having to make incisions in their holdings?" Just say it: What will happen to Fox News?

Crook said it was quite a "catalog of disasters" with closing down News of the World and now accepting resignations from top News Corp./NOTW executives like Les Hinton and Rebekah Brooks. But he also said the really tight relationship in Britain between politicians and the newspapers came about because...Britain has "largely succeeded in getting money out of politics." It dramatically increased media power. No wonder the liberal media favors it: