On Thursday, in a story which made the front page of Friday's print edition, Jonathan Martin at The New York Times reported that Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton is "effectively acknowledging how difficult they think it will be to defeat Donald J. Trump" in Ohio.



The first presidential debate between Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton is in the books, and the front page of the New York Times registered an amazingly slanted front-page “news analysis” by Michael Barbaro and Matt Flegenheimer. They sternly rebuked Trump for daring to suggest Hillary Clinton had once been insensitive about race: "No amount of practice, it seemed, could fully prepare her -- or perhaps anyone -- for Donald J. Trump’s hurricane of factual distortion, taunting interruptions and blustery generalities."



The Sunday before the first presidential debate of 2016 was filled with analysis and speculation about how the candidates were going to perform. It was the same on CNN’s Inside Politics were their panel touted Hillary Clinton’s ability to debate.  Host John King played a clip of Clinton leaving Senator Bernie Sanders speechless after slamming his questions about her speaking fees as a smear, saying it was a clue about how Monday’s debate might turn out. 



The New York Times on Sunday attacked Republican Donald Trump on several fronts, including instigating hate crimes against Muslims. Reporter Jonathan Martin filed “Anything Goes Campaign an Alarming Precedent.” The teary-eyed text box: “Long-held ideals seem of little concern to Donald Trump.” And Martin’s colleague Eric Lichtblau fingered Trump for a alleged rise in “hate crimes” against American Muslims.



Imagine if 2012 Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney had spent almost all of his campaigning efforts hobnobbing with rich donors to the virtual exclusion of public appearances. The press would have mercilessly pounded him for fitting the "they only care about the one percent" GOP stereotype.

The New York Times has noticed that 2016 Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton has been doing exactly what would subject any Republican presidential candidate to withering criticism. Saturday evening, in a story which appeared in on the front page of Sunday's print edition, reporters Amy Chozick and Jonathan Martin desperately tried damage control, while perhaps sending a warning to Team Clinton that, with the polls tightening, they need to get their candidate out more.



New York Times coverage of Night 3 of the Democratic National Convention could be characterized by an hour-long swoon over Barack Obama’s speech -- pardon, his “stirring valedictory address." Also, Democrats were (again!) finding their voice on gun control, Bill celebrated Hillary, TMI-style, and Frank Bruni celebrated the president as "our national poet."



Night 2 of Democratic Convention coverage: A New York Times reporter referred to the Clintons’ “very rich and complicated relationship,” the “historic” card was played nonstop, and the editorial page owes Mitt Romney an apology on Russia. The reporters weren’t particularly thrilled with Bill Clinton’s speech, but one reporter still found a euphemism for Bill Clinton's personal sex scandals, finding the Clintons' marriage a "rich and complicated relationship."



The final night of the Republican National Convention that crowned Donald Trump as the party’s nominee was greeted in dark tones on the front of Friday’s paper. Reporters Patrick Healy and Jonathan Martin found a “vehement” and “incendiary” candidate, while Michael Barbaro found himself flabbergasted by Trump’s failure to show  “humility, generosity and depth," and Adam Nagourney lamented "one of the darker speeches I’ve heard in American politics."

 



The New York Times continued to evade the issue of Islamic terror in its reporting on the Orlando nightclub massacre. Jonathan Martin and Alexander Burns targeted Donald Trump for his intolerance on the front-page under a lecturing headline “Branding Muslims as Threats, Trump Tosses Pluralism Aside.” Also, reporter Jim Yardley fretted about the bizarre aberration" of America's gun laws while finding threats among "evangelical Christianity" but not radical Islam. And the liberal Times apparently considers Mexico not to be an "advanced" country.



The New York Times reacted to the Islamic terror massacre in Orlando in predictable fashion, with muted gun control editorials in its news reports and warnings to Donald Trump not to “demagogue” the issue of radical Islam. Omar Mateen, who claimed loyalty to ISIS and went on a rampage at a gay nightclub in Orlando, killing 49, declared allegiance to the Islamic State in a 911 call. Yet some Times reporters did their best to downplay the Islam angle.



The New York Times filed some disturbing facts about what happened outside a Trump rally in New Mexico: “Protesters Throw Rocks at Police Horses Outside Trump Rally in Albuquerque.” But the troubling story of left-wing protestor violence against police and property -- a story that would seem to justify the anxieties of Trump supporters -- didn’t make the print edition. Instead, the reporting from New Mexico that actually made it into print was about Trump slamming the state’s Republican governor Susana Martinez, under an ethnically loaded headline: “Trump Takes a Female, Hispanic Governor to Task.”



The New York Times continues to list portside in its labeling, going particularly overboard in the last several months in using “hard-line” and “hard-right” to describe conservative presidential candidates, their policy positions, and the voters those candidates are appealing to. Yet no similarly unflattering term emerged in stories about liberal presidential candidates Sen. Bernie Sanders and Hillary Clinton, who take extremist positions on abortion, the minimum wage, and the evils of big banks and big business.The Times commented on Bernie Sanders’ “hard-left policies” on July 26, 2015. Since then, an analysis indicates there have been absolutely zero characterizations of either Bernie Sanders or Hillary Clinton as “hard-left,” and only one instance of Hillary Clinton being “hard-line,” and even that reference was flattering.