Washington Post reporter Bob Woodward is best known for his role in the Watergate scandal, but that reputation didn’t help him at all when he attempted to moderate a discussion on a new book concerning the #MeToo phenomenon. Instead, Woodward ran into a buzzsaw of criticism with boos and heckling while hosting a discussion with New York Times reporters Megan Twohey and Jodi Kantor, the authors of a book that describes the beginning of that sexual abuse scandal.



After almost a month of attempts to impugn Brett Kavanaugh with flimsy, uncorroborated, 11th hour allegations, the liberal media saw their attempts come up empty on Saturday with Kavanaugh’s official confirmation to the Supreme Court. But left behind in their wake was one dumpster fire after another, ranging from fake news to bias that radicalized even the most hardened Never Trumpers to rally behind the Judge. 



Appearing on Thursday’s CBS This Morning ahead of the Senate hearing on Christine Blasey Ford’s sexual assault allegations against Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh, New York Times reporter Jodi Kantor claimed that Ford’s unsubstantiated claims were “growing stronger” and touted how there was no longer a “presumption of innocence for the man” in such cases.



CBS This Morning journalists on Friday lectured that Republicans during the Brett Kavanaugh sexual assault hearings are at risk of, once again, of being portrayed as “clueless and insensitive men.” Just like in the Anita Hill/Clarence Thomas hearings from 1991. To bolster this, CBS played clips of Senators questioning Hill, except the examples included mostly weren’t of Republicans, but instead Democratic Senators Joe Biden and Howell Heflin and then-Republican Arlen Specter, who would later switch parties to become a Democrat. 



The journalists at CBS This Morning on Monday fawned over the march by liberal women over the weekend, devoting eight minutes and 36 seconds to it. Co-host Charlie Rose was so excited, he marveled, “Is it comparable to anything in history we have seen?” 



Fresh off her glowing column on Sunday polishing First Lady Michelle Obama’s apple, author and New York Times correspondent Jodi Kantor appeared on Monday’s CBS This Morning to similarly praise President Obama for being “a big believer in taking a kind of above the fray, unifying, nonpartisan tone.”



The front page of the Sunday Review was graced with a half-page photo illustration of first lady Michelle Obama under a story by Jodi Kantor, “Michelle Obama’s Turn.” Kantor is author of “The Obamas: The Partnership Behind a Historic Presidency,” which didn’t exactly speak truth to power. In her latest Kantor, who is an actual reporter for the Times, portrayed president-elect Donald Trump as an interloping brute come to wreck the first lady’s house.



The ultimate night of the Democratic National Convention saw the coronation of Hillary Clinton as the first female presidential nominee, celebrated on whole top half of the front page of Friday's New York Times. Meanwhile, Patrick Healy and Amy Chozick did their best to both humanize and historicize Hillary, "who sacrificed personal ambition for her husband’s political career and then rose to be a globally influential figure....a prize that generations of American women have dreamed about for one of their own."



The New York Times dove right back into a controversy it instigated last month on public pools segregated by sex for religious reasons, in which the paper showed himself to be a very selective supporter of public religious accommodations. The nasty double standard resurfaced on Thursday, with Sarah Maslin Nir’s Metro story on the Brooklyn pool controversy, “A Battle Over Gender and Religion, at the Pool.” The online headline was more colorful: “Pool Rules: No Running, No Eating and, Three Times a Week, No Men.” Nir felt free to mock the “prudish” Hasidic outfits in a way the Times would never do with Muslim women clad head-to-toe in burkas.



In a display of awe and admiration, the cast of CBS This Morning were stunned to learn of the “generosity and trust” of Canadian families who currently host Syrian refugees in Toronto. During the interview with New York Times reporter Jodi Kantor, the hosts were excited to hear of the friendly and open Canadians while painting Americans (primarily Republicans) as “fearful” and Islamophobic.



New York Times San Francisco bureau chief Thomas Fuller embraced a major shift toward European-style social policy in that city in Wednesday's “No Pay Cuts for New Parents in San Francisco – City Becomes the First in the Country to Approve Six Weeks of Fully Paid Leave.” As shown by that headline, the Times got really excited about the local liberal ordinance, with a full story on the front of the National section, including two large photos with parents and cute toddlers. (Conservative legislation protecting religious freedom wasn’t welcomed with the same enthusiasm.) The paper clearly saw the socialist-style measure as an indisputable good thing, and Fuller himself questioned on Twitter why it took so long for America to get with the program of becoming more like European social democracies.



On Monday’s CBS This Morning, co-host Norah O’Donnell asked New York Times reporter Jodi Kantor about how the Supreme Court’s gay marriage ruling would impact 2016 Republican candidates: “...none of the 13 Republican candidates who are running for president have embraced gay marriage. How does that affect the ongoing presidential campaign?”