On Wednesday's Morning Joe, MSNBC again gave a demonstration of the phenomenon of right-leaning commentators -- who in some cases actually have a history of being pretty solidly conservative -- failing to insert much in the way of strident conservative commentary into the political discussion during their MSNBC appearances.



Last week, astoundingly from ex-FBI Director James Comey of all people, we learn this of his look into the Hillary Clinton e-mail fiasco: “At one point the attorney general had directed me not to call it investigation, but instead to call it a matter, which concerned and confused me.” A look back into the mists of the Obama era and we find stories like this one, as headlined here for a George Will column:



Last week, vehement anti-Trumper George Will declared that conservatism in 2017 is “soiled by scowling primitives.” Washington Monthly blogger Martin Longman doesn’t disagree, but he contends that Will is partly to blame for that sordid state of affairs.



The Nation’s Eric Alterman doesn’t mind that a few weeks ago, The New York Times added another conservative op-ed columnist. He just wishes it hadn’t been the “awful” Bret Stephens, who used to write for “the rubes who believe what they read in Rupert Murdoch’s Wall Street Journal” but now is tasked with impressing the “smarter and more sophisticated” readership of the Times.



Yes, Brian Williams is supposedly and genuinely fearful about the future of American conservatism. On Thursday’s The 11th Hour, the disgraced anchor fretted to George Will on liberal MSNBC of all places about conservatism and that “[f]or many years, you were the Republican on mainstream media, before the days where every American woke up to a cable network custom designed to agree with them.” 



Several decades ago, there were plenty of right-of-center Democrats and left-of-center Republicans. These days, however, almost everyone agrees that the Democrats have become a distinctly liberal party and the GOP a distinctly conservative party. One who disagrees in part is writer Conor Lynch, who in a Saturday article claimed that Republicans have transitioned out of true conservatism and now are “extreme nihilists” who have “embraced Bolshevism of the right.”

Lynch noted that pundits such as George Will and David Brooks “have widely condemned Donald Trump as a fake conservative, and they’re not wrong. Trump is clearly not conservative—but neither is the Republican Party...[which] has become an increasingly friendly place for…the kind of characters who used to make up the John Birch Society…For the sake of John Boehner’s mental well being, he is lucky he got out when he did.”



Recapping the liberal media's infatuation and uneasiness with Ted Cruz's "New York values" comment, Fox News Sunday panelist and Washington Post columnist George Will highlighted how Cruz's slogan has had nothing to do with 9/11 but instead how the city's liberal base has recently honored Soviet spies and elected a mayor who used to work for the Sandinistas.



On two separate Sunday morning talk shows following the third Super Tuesday, conservative writers George Will and Rich Lowry expounded upon their frustrations with the “rats” and “Vichy Republicans” in the GOP and conservative movement for their opportunistic bowing to presidential candidate Donald Trump.



Amidst all the discussions of the jockeying back and forth in the 2016 presidential race, Washington Post syndicated columnist and Fox News contributor reminded conservatives on Fox News Sunday of how the Democratic Party’s liberal base has been eroded and now largely has become almost desperately dependent on the votes of minorities and government works that all belong to public sector unions.



Three of the four Sunday network morning news shows commented on Saturday’s New York Times front-page editorial calling for massive gun control, but it was The Federalist’s Ben Domenech and The Washington Post’s George Will that provided the most succinct takedowns of the liberal paper and the disconnect it exhibited in opinion between the liberal media and President Obama versus the American people.



The war of words between Bill O’Reilly and George Will over the long-term effects on Ronald Reagan of the 1981 assassination attempt amounts to a loose thread that could eventually cause the unraveling of conservatism, argued Sean Illing in a Friday article.

Illing opined that “conservatism, as a governing philosophy, continues to resonate because of Reagan’s perceived success” -- “perceived” being the operative word, since Illing went on to argue that “Reagan’s policies…made government more bloated, more defense-oriented, more oligarchic, and less democratic. Conservatives never reckon with these facts because the ahistorical canonization of Reagan prevents them from doing so.”



After Hillary Clinton gave a rare interview with MSNBC’s Andrea Mitchell about her ongoing e-mail issues, the political panel on Fox News Sunday took the former Secretary of State to task for her refusal to fully take responsibility for her use of a private e-mail server. Conservative columnist George Will dismissed Clinton’s claim that she “absentmindedly set up an alternative e-mail system” as something that “doesn't pass the laugh test.”