On CNN's Reliable Sources on Sunday, Vox.com's Ezra Klein lamented the attention President Donald Trump continues to receive, whining that his rallies and tweets are crowding out "other important issues." Klein wants the establishment press and cable news — by that, he clearly means everyone but Fox — to pay less attention to Trump, even though he effectively admitted that doing so would cause hits to ratings and online traffic (Earth to Ezra: You're in charge of a business). Fox, which is already crushing its rivals, would probably love it if the rest of the press were to follow Klein's suggestion.



The idea promoted among the left that President Donald Trump is some sort of fascist is nothing new and the latest example of this comes from Vox co-founder Ezra Klein on May 28 in which he compares Trump to to fictional fascist president Charles Lindbergh in the late novelist Philip Roth's novel The Plot Against America:

 



The journalists on MSNBC are in a huff because Donald Trump isn’t catering to them. Appearing on Monday’s Last Word, Ezra Klein appeared “disappointed” that the infrastructure bill supported by the President and Congress doesn’t go far enough. Vox editor Klein marveled, “I do not understand why they didn't go big on an infrastructure bill. It would have been good politics and clearly it’s what Donald Trump actually believes.” 



CNN New Day was up to their usual antics Wednesday morning as they brought on two leftists to discuss the GOP’s “monstrosity” of a health care bill. Ezra Klein, Editor-in-Chief of the far-left publication Vox, and Andy Slavitt, former Acting Administrator of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services under President Obama, were chosen to analyze the GOP’s potential bill.
 



In the long run, Republicans’ health-care-reform efforts are going to backfire, suggested Vox editor-in-chief Klein last Thursday. He argued that if Congress junks the Affordable Care Act, “Medicare for all” will become a rallying cry for Democrats, and once Dems return to power, “they’ll pass what many of them wanted to pass” instead of the ACA: “A heavily subsidized buy-in program for Medicare or Medicaid, funded by a tax increase on the rich. A policy like that…will satisfy an angry party seeking the fastest, most defensible path to restoring [Obamacare’s] coverage gains.”



The liberal website Vox has recently released an article and video that calls for its adherents to not trust their own federal government, so long as President Trump is in office. This coming from the Editor-in-chief of Vox.



Hours after Donald Trump announced Republican Congressman Tom Price as his pick for Health and Human Services Secretary, the media had already begun their witch hunt against him. Price is a vocal opponent of Obamacare with a consistently conservative record on social issues such as abortion. This, of course, made him an easy target for liberal journalists who took to Twitter Tuesday morning to bash the cabinet pick as a disaster for poor people and the LGBT community.



It’s often noted that Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump are the most disliked presidential nominees in a long, long time. Vox’s Klein claimed in a Tuesday piece that their unpopularity extends to the media, especially in Trump’s case. “While it’s ridiculous to suggest the media likes Hillary Clinton — her relationship with the press is famously, legendarily toxic — the media is increasingly biased against Trump,” acknowledged Klein. “He really is getting different, harsher treatment than any candidate in memory. That he deserves it is important context to the discussion, but not, I think, the whole explanation.”



Like or dislike Barack Obama, his keynote address at the 2004 Democratic convention caused a lot of people to think of him as a potential president. Now we have a Donald Trump speech that’s supposedly disqualifying as far as Trump’s bid for the presidency is concerned. According to the headline in Vox, Trump’s Saturday remarks introducing his VP pick, Mike Pence, “showed why” Trump “shouldn’t be president.” The article that followed, by  editor-in-chief Klein, asserted that Trump’s speech “was weird [and] shocking. Forget the political mainstream. What happened today sat outside the mainstream for normal human behavior...This was also a scary speech to watch, and insofar as the presidential campaign is a test to see who has the character, the discipline, and the seriousness to be President of the United States, Trump is failing it.”



Raymond Shaw is the kindest, bravest, warmest, most wonderful human being I've ever known in my life.

Anybody who ever saw the movie The Manchurian Candidate would have quickly thought it rather odd that every soldier captured in Korea with Raymond Shaw gave identical answers when asked to describe him. However, when associates of Hillary used identical answers to describe her, Ezra Klein of Vox seems not to notice anything strange there. Here is Ezra making the observation about those identical (robotic?) descriptions without the least hint of curiosity as to the Manchurian Candidate quality about them:



Vox editor-in-chief Klein doesn’t often look back fondly at the good old days of the conservative movement, but he did so in a Sunday post inspired by the death of Nancy Reagan. Klein thinks conservatism was at its best in the 1980s, for which he gives considerable credit to the First Couple of the era.

Klein wrote that the “political genius” of the Reagans “was to shape the pessimistic, angry conservatism of Barry Goldwater into a more hopeful, inclusive ideology…an ideology that felt confident rather than scared…Today, though, conservatism feels like it's falling back into its pre-Reagan despair…Rather than believing in the essential greatness of America, conservatives today often speak as if the country is an election away from losing its magnificence forever.”



Discussing the fallout of Sunday’s Democratic presidential debate on the Monday edition of MSNBC’s All In, host Chris Hayes and Vox Editor-in-Chief Ezra Klein lamented that Clinton’s “tremendous command and mastery” of subject material when working with colleagues hasn’t exactly shown through to voters as she’s “seemed paralyzed by her knowledge of how many ways a straightforward position can get attacked.”