Since early April, the New York Times has presented a weekly "Red Century" series of op-eds dedicated to "Exploring the history and legacy of Communism, 100 years after the Russian Revolution" in 1917. The competition for the worst "communism wasn't all that bad" entry was pretty close until Saturday (seen in Sunday's print edition), when Kristen R. Ghodsee, a University of Pennsylvania professor of Russian and East European studies, told readers that "Women Had Better Sex Under Socialism," and deigned to tell us why.


Appearing as a guest on Friday's New Day on CNN to discuss the recent tensions between the U.S. and North Korea, New York Times columnist Tom Friedman went so far as to recommend that the U.S. should offer to recognize the legitimacy of the North Korean regime in an effort to get the dictatorial government to give up its nuclear weapons.


I spent much of my Friday binge-watching Comrade Detective, a show that resists genre, but is perfect in its oddity. Released on August 3, Amazon bills the show as a Romanian detective show from the 1980s that was actually thinly disguised anti-capitalist propaganda. They then brought in such talent as Channing Tatum and Joseph Gordon-Levitt to dub over the original Romanian dialogue. In reality, this is a new show created to make fun of these old propaganda pieces, and mocks their love of communism and fear of the capitalist west. Yes, it was filmed in Romania with Romanian actors, but specifically for this concept. It's weird, and it completely works.


On Sunday’s Reliable Sources, CNN host Brian Stelter offered zero pushback on CNN presidential historian Douglas Brinkley’s latest unhinged tirade in which he compared President Trump to 20th century dictators Francisco Franco of Spain and Benito Mussolini of Italy.


On Thursday's New Day on CNN, during a discussion of President Donald Trump's speech in Poland, CNN international correspondent Christiane Amanpour at one point hinted that those who are "denying climate science" are similar to those who used to think the planets and sun revolve around the Earth as she recalled Trump's decision to pull the U.S. out of the Paris Accord.

 


of the very many things that has been hammered home in the President Donald Trump era - is that if the media wants to make a non-story a story, they certainly can. At least for them and theirs. No matter how ridiculous and fact-free the tale. It can be patently obvious that the “A” they are selling is actually “Not A” - but that matters not. The media floods the zone with it, and that’s all we get.


Otto Warmbier, the 22-year-old student from Wyoming, Ohio and the University of Virginia who was returned to his family in a coma last week after being imprisoned in North Korea for over a year, died on Monday. Tuesday morning, the Associated Press and "experts" it consulted somehow found the communist nation's treatment of Warmbier "one of the more perplexing and heart-rending developments in North Korea's long, antagonistic standoff with its neighbors and Washington." A reading of AP's "analysis" indicates that it's fair to claim that restrictions North Korea has placed on the wire service in return for its presence there have pervasively affected the credibility of all of its reporting from and even about that country.


On the June 11 NBC Nightly News, correspondent Lucy Kafanov voiced nostalgia for the days of communism as she reported on poverty in rural Russia. "It wasn't always like this," Kafanov argued. "In the Soviet era, most villagers worked on huge collective farms. Life wasn't easy, but the government provided for the people."


Tonight (Monday), CBS-affiliated Showtime begins The Putin Interviews, a four-night series of interview excerpts with Russian President Vladimir Putin, conducted by far-left film maker Oliver Stone who, judging by a previous series on Showtime, has an affinity for KGB-connected strongmen.


Al retirar sus patrocinios, Univisión y otros patrocinadores corporativos tradicionales del Desfile Puertorriqueño de Nueva York escucharon la voz de la abrumadora mayoría de sus audiencias y consumidores, dijo el Centro de Investigación Mediática (MRC, por sus siglas en inglés), el principal organismo de vigilancia de los medios de comunicación de los Estados Unidos.


New York Times reporter Mike Ives covered the furor over Yang Shuping, a Chinese student who just graduated from the University of Maryland, praising the United States and criticizing her home country in her commencement speech: “Chinese Student, Graduating in Maryland, Sets Off a Furor by Praising the U.S.” Yet Ives, who works in an industry that relies on free speech, comes off as almost apologetic on behalf of the Communist Chinese and the loyal social media thugocracy who harassed Shuping into making a meek apology. Ives’ report managed to totally leave off the “Communist” descriptor of the authoritarian China regime. Meanwhile, the Washington Post's coverage made clear the regime’s intimidation of the student for speaking her mind.


The Washington Post put Democratic scandal – former Rep. Anthony Weiner pleading guilty to “sexting” a 15-year-old girl -- over on page A-3 on Saturday. On the front was a story to make Democrats feel righteous. The headline was “New Orleans removes Confederacy monuments.” Post reporter Janell Ross wasn’t trying to hide her feelings about how wonderful it was: an end to "more than 130 years of publicly honoring a man who embodied Southern pride and racial oppression."

So how does the Post feel about Vladimir Lenin? Isn't he a communist oppressor? There's a Lenin statue in Seattle, and the Post thinks that's a "wacky joke," an appropriate art piece for a "holy place of hipsterdom."