NBC Champions New York’s ‘New Groundbreaking’ ‘Free’ College Tuition

The ultra-socialist state of New York became the first state in the union to saddle its taxpayers with “free” tuition to four-year public colleges and universities on Monday, and the liberal media couldn’t be happier. “The Empire State has become the first state to offer free four-year tuition to the state's public universities for low and middle-income families,” praised Anchor Lest Holt during NBC Nightly News, “It opens doors for students who otherwise couldn't afford it, but will other states follow New York's lead?”

Business Correspondent Jo Ling Kent shared Holt’s enthusiasm and touted New York’s expensive effort. “Today, a four-year-degree is within her grasp thanks to a new groundbreaking program in New York State,” she reported, “Students from families making less than $100,000 a year will get free college tuition at state universities starting this fall.”

According to Kent, the $100,000 a year cut off was only the start and would jump up to $110,000 and $125,000 in 2018 and 2019 respectively. “To qualify, students must enroll full-time and average 30 credits a year, maintain the GPA required to graduate and live and work in-state after college the same number of years they received tuition assistance,” she explained.

As someone who attended Binghamton University (a public school in New York), I’ll note that the credit and GPA requirement for the program match up with the bare minimum for qualifying as a full-time student in good standing.

“Free two-year-college is already offered in Tennessee, Oregon, Minnesota, and California,” Kent added as she cut to a supporter of the program. “Today's announcement in New York could really inspire other states to tackle the problem of college affordability,” the Institute for Higher Education Policy’s Julie Ajinkya told Kent.

Kent highlighted a clip of New York Governor Andrew Cuomo shouting to a crowd, saying, “College is what high school was 50 years ago. And 50 years ago we had the sense as a society to say, free public high school.” But all of America was witness to the skyrocketing spending for subpar results under our current educational system.

The cost of the program looks to be tremendous. According to The Washington Post, $163 million is the “estimated cost for the first year;” a cost that will surely balloon out of control as tuition costs continue to rise. This is also the state that is slowly introducing a $15 minimum wage. It’s almost as if Cuomo is doing everything in his power to drive up taxes, cost of living, and drive away residents. This News Analyst being one of them. It’s a phenomenon that has been well documented by New York reporters.

It’s clear that NBC doesn’t have a care in the world for what this will cost the average taxpayer in New York. They’re only concerned with the optics of how good it looks that liberals are purportedly helping the less fortunate. They didn’t even mention how much the program was going to cost and only focused on the ideas that were designed to make people feel good. This is evident by Holt immediately pushing for other states to follow suit.  

Transcript below:

<<< Please support MRC's NewsBusters team with a tax-deductible contribution today. >>>

NBC Nightly News
April 10, 2017
7:16:46 PM Eastern

LESTER HOLT: We're back now with a big announcement here in New York capturing the attention of families all across the country. The Empire State has become the first state to offer free four-year tuition to the state's public universities for low and middle-income families. It opens doors for students who otherwise couldn't afford it, but will other states follow New York's lead? Here is NBC News Business Correspondent Jo Ling Kent.

JO LING KENT: For Melissa Bolivar, going to college is a dream she feared was just out of reach.

MELISSA OLIVAR: It's very important because it could open a lot of doors, and especially from me, like coming from, you know, a low-income family.

KENT: Today, a four-year-degree is within her grasp thanks to a new ground breaking program in New York State. Students from families making less than $100,000 a year will get free college tuition at state universities starting this fall. The income requirement rises to $110,000 the following year and $125,000 the year after. With tuition at state four-year-colleges costing about $6500 a year, that adds up to $26,000, not including room and board.

ANDREW CUOMO: College is what high school was 50 years ago. And 50 years ago we had the sense as a society to say, free public high school.

KENT: The Olivar family is one of the 80% of New York families with college-aged children expected to be eligible for free tuition. To qualify, students must enroll full-time and average 30 credits a year, maintain the GPA required to graduate and live and work in-state after college the same number of years they received tuition assistance. Free two-year-college is already offered in Tennessee, Oregon, Minnesota and California.

JULIE AJINKYA: Today's announcement in New York could really inspire other states to tackle the problem of college affordability.

KENT: This fall Olivar heads to the City University of New York to major in chemistry and become a doctor.

OLIVAR: I will be able, you know, to go to college without having a big burden on my shoulder.

KENT: The financial freedom to fulfill her big dreams. Jo Ling Kent, NBC News, New York. 

CyberAlerts Economy Budget Taxes Wages & Prices Education Higher Education Bias by Omission Covert Liberal Activists Labeling Political Groups Liberals & Democrats NBC NBC Nightly News Video Lester Holt