At the nation’s top two Hispanic television networks, the annual “Day of the Dead” celebrations were more important than tens of thousands of Latinos in the U.S. getting jobs, and driving unemployment among Latinos to yet another record low.



As voters head to the polls this Election Day, one thing on many of their minds is the U.S. economy. They just haven’t seen much of it on the network news.

The liberal media know the economy is one of the top issues for voters, yet broadcast network evening shows provided scant coverage of it the week before the elections in spite of an 18-year-high for consumer confidence and a 250,000 jobs report.



With one week to the midterm elections, the Conference Board released its latest survey of consumers showing their confidence soared to an 18-year high and also found high expectations for early 2019. This might well surprise many news consumers given how little effort the media have spent reporting on the good economy.



Amazon CEO and founder Jeff Bezos is now the world’s wealthiest man, and the liberal media love denouncing him for it.

They’ve also started telling him what to do with his money and power now that he’s begun giving some of it away. Bezos is estimated to be worth $162 billion, and he and his wife announced on Sept. 13, they would give $2 billion to address homelessness and preschool education.



Besides gay rights, Shameless, Showtime’s hit liberal show, has yet another social justice cause to champion. This time it's equal pay.



On Monday, the White House sparked controversy after the American flag atop the building was raised from half-staff before the remains of Senator John McCain were even in the Capitol. Also on Monday, the White House struck a brand new trade deal with Mexico that would end yet another theater in the administration’s trade wars and is said to help American businesses and consumers. The former was part of a long-running political feud while the latter affected the lives of millions of Americans. Both ABC and CBS actually spent more time during their evening broadcasts on the feud than the end of a trade war.



As Vermont Democratic gubernatorial nominee Christine Hallquist appeared as a guest on MSNBC Live with Ali Velshi, the MSNBC host went along with his liberal guest's premise that liberal policies should not be labeled as "progressive" as the liberal host referred to his Canadian roots and suggested that liberalism just be called "normal." Notably, a bit later in the segment, the graphics team made a faux pas as an image of Wisconsin Republican Governor Scott Walker appeared on screen while they were discussing the approval rating of Vermont Republican Governor Phil Scott.



The Trump administration’s winning record on Hispanic unemployment finally received a long overdue nod of recognition from top national Spanish-language media outlets Univision and CNN en Español. As unemployment among the nation’s largest minority group fell for the second consecutive, record-setting month, both Univision and CNN en Español trumpeted the news in their principal national evening news programs.



Poverty is no mystery, and it's easily avoidable. The poverty line that the Census Bureau used in 2016 for a single person was an income of $12,486 that year. For a two-person household, it was $16,072, and for a four-person household, it was $24,755. To beat those poverty thresholds is fairly simple. Here's the road map: Complete high school; get a job, any kind of a job; get married before having children; and be a law-abiding citizen.



The Canadian government, lining the pockets of its dairy producers, imposes high tariffs on American dairy imports. That forces Canadians to pay higher prices for dairy products. For example, Canadians pay $5.24 for a 10.5-ounce block of cheddar. In Washington, D.C., that same amount of cheddar sells for $3.64. Canadians pay $3.99 for a 1-pound container of yogurt. In Washington, D.C., you can get nearly twice as much yogurt for a little over $4. It's clear that the Canadian government's tariffs screw its citizens by forcing them to pay higher prices for dairy products.



Starbucks CEO Kevin Johnson announced Tuesday that the nation's number 3 fast-food outlet (by number of locations) is closing 150 U.S. stores. It's not difficult to read Johnson's comments as indicating that the shuttered stores will primarily be in "blue" or liberal sections of the U.S. At the same time, he has specifically targeted "middle America and the South" for expansion. The business press isn't even trying to make the obvious connection between Johnson's announcement and the respective presence or absence of high minimum-wage laws and excessive regulation.



There are now more job openings in America than Americans looking for jobs.

The Wall Street Journal reported on June 5, that in spring 2018, the U.S. economy reached this unique milestone — the first time since the Labor Department began tracking the statistic in 2000.