NPR's Morning Edition on Monday zeroed in on a pro-life group's ongoing protest outside Kentucky's last abortion clinic. Correspondent Lisa Gillespie featured three pro-abortion activists during her report versus just one pro-lifer. Gillespie also let one of the abortion backers smear pro-lifers as potential terrorists. Vicki Saporta of the National Abortion Federation contended that prosecuting those who use the controversial tactic of blocking abortion clinic entrances prevents "the kinds of arsons, bombings, and murders that we've too often seen."


Last September, as I noted in a NewsBusters post, the Washington Post published a column by feminist freelancer Jody Allard, who used her perch to publicly shame her sons, lamenting how they were "blind to rape culture." Last week, facing criticism for continuing to expose her parent-child struggles and her sons' apparently unacceptable worldviews, she went to Medium.com to explain why she's not letting up. Those who continue to carry her columns need to be asked how they can justify continuing to enable her.


Mainstream media bias isn't just against President Trump, but also Israel. On Friday, CNN, NBC, ABC, and CBS published headlines equating three terrorists behind clashes in the West Bank during the day with three Israelis who were stabbed to death the following night in the area.


Friday morning on Fox & Friends, Washington Post Writers Group columnist Ruben Navarrette, Jr. gave President Donald Trump only grudging and partial credit for the steep decline in illegal border crossings from Mexico into the U.S. so far this year.


The Wednesday edition of NPR's All Things Considered spotlighted 15 teenaged Latina activists who protested a new law in Texas that allows law enforcement in the state to investigate the immigration status of individuals in police custody. The young women dressed in formal dresses during their demonstration outside the state capitol in Austin, and performed a choreographed dance. Correspondent Vanessa Romo identified the group that organized the protest, but failed to mention their liberal ideology.


The Women's March movement has received fawning and forgiving establishment press attention, particularly from the Associated Press and New York Times, since its first official event the day after President Donald Trump's inauguration. Now the movement appears to be (or at least should be) self-immolating for several reasons, most recently its unapologetic support for a 1970s convicted cop killer. That controversy has even pulled in the Black Lives Matter movement, which has also received consistent and undeserved favorable press treatment, also exposing BLM once again as consistently, violently radical. Now the AP and the Times aren't covering either group's direct association with this controversy.


On Wednesday, President Trump’s bipartisan Commission on Election Integrity, led by Vice President Mike Pence, assembled for the first time. The commission’s responsibility was to investigate possible election fraud and other election related criminal behavior. Despite the importance of this commission, ABC and NBC failed to give the commission any time at all during their evening broadcasts. CBS was the only network in the Big Three to mention it, but they were skeptical and mislead on its intentions.


How "far right" can Texas go? The scare-mongering theme about “vanishing Republican moderates” is a popular myth at the Times and other liberal media outlets, especially in red states like Texas. The New York Times really went overboard with it Wednesday in “Bathroom Bill Tests the Clout of a Rare Moderate in Texas” by Manny Fernandez and David Montgomery. Fernandez, Houston bureau chief for the Times, is clearly not comfortable in what he has called “ultraconservative Texas.”


Pausing briefly from the press's never-ending Trump-Russia obsession, both Politico Magazine and USA Today decided earlier this week to focus on the state of President Donald Trump's health. Nothing tangible appears to have prompted either report. USA Today absurdly issued a "breaking news" alert on the topic.


A Tuesday report from the Associated Press played up climate change's apparent impact inside the African country of South Sudan. Correspondent Sam Mednick acknowledged that the civil war in "the world’s youngest nation" was a factor, but still touted the "devastating effects of climate change" in the country.


Hootie Johnson, former chairman of the Augusta National Golf Club in Augusta, Ga., home of The Master’s Golf Tournament, died on Friday at age 86. The New York Times recognized him in an obituary by Richard Goldstein and could not resist getting in last swings at its unlikely foe. In 2002-03, Johnson was in the paper’s cross-hairs for refusing to admit women members to Augusta National. In a notorious editorial in November 2002, “America’s All-Male Golfing Society,” obsessive anti-Augusta crusader and Times executive editor Howell Raines even suggested Tiger Woods, then king of the golf world, boycott the tournament in solidarity. Raines targeted CBS as well, which had the broadcast rights to the tournament, and did multiple stories, many on the front page, keeping the pressure on CBS and Augusta National.


Keith Olbermann doubled down on his ridiculous accusations of treason against the Trump family with a tweet Monday morning. In response to President Trump’s tweet that most politicians would’ve gone to the meeting his son attended Olbermann replied, “Sure! Benedict Arnold would have. And Aaron Burr. And Charles Lindbergh. And Quisling. And Marshal Petain. That's politics! Annnnnd treason!” The initial charges of treason were idiotic enough, but now Donald Trump Jr. equates to the greatest traitor in American history?