New York Times reporter Trip Gabriel was clearly smitten with Richard Ojeda, a Democratic congressional candidate in West Virginia, who rose out of the Times-supported teachers strikes in that state. The gushing headline matched the story’s enthusiasm: “How to Flip Coal Country? Ask the Democrat in Combat Boots.” Gabriel was busy arranging flattering vignettes for the Democratic candidate: "Even more than for his politics, Mr. Ojeda is known for his big personality, with a gung-ho idea of leadership and a rousing speaking style. He is George Patton with an Appalachian twang and minus the profanity."



Paid Off is a brand-new TV game show that claims to be “working to end the student debt crisis.” The show’s host even told a liberal magazine Paid Off stands on the shoulders of the Occupy Movement, revealing the game show’s tilt to the left on the issue of student loans.



One might expect Jerry Seinfeld's latest edition of Comedians in Cars Getting Coffee, "2018: Freshly Brewed," on Netflix to get political, since comedians just can't seem to help themselves right now in jumping on the Trump bashing train, so I was pleasantly surprised to find the focus on funny instead of on politics. In fact, when guests tried to get political, Seinfeld quickly shut them down, or - shock - they talked about liberal intolerance!



On Sunday's AM Joy, MSNBC host Joy Reid showed signs of being so far inside the liberal bubble that it's like she spent the last 20 years in an an alternative universe as she actually suggested that the dominant media were "enchanted" with George W. Bush and Sarah Palin because they spoke in a way that was not "erudite," but that Barack Obama was "disparaged" as "almost too erudite and too articulate."



In yet another disservice to its viewers, Telemundo, the Spanish-language sister television network of NBC, chose to blast the headline “Trump Against Minorities” when reporting on the Trump administration’s revocation of Obama-era guidelines on affirmative action.



Amy Wax, a University of Pennsylvania law professor, has come under attack and scathing criticism because she dared criticize the school's racial preferences program. In an interview with Brown University economist Glenn Loury, discussing affirmative action, Wax mentioned how racial preferences hinder the ability of blacks to succeed academically by admitting them into schools at which they are in over their heads academically.



President Trump ruffled the liberal media’s feathers again on Tuesday after his Justice Department released new guidelines instructing colleges and universities to not use a person’s race as a factor in admissions. It’s a reversal of an Obama-era guideline so, of course, ABC and NBC were against the move and downplayed the plight of Asian-Americans whose race meant affirmative action policies burdened them with a higher standard.



A Friday article from NPR drew attention to three teenaged artists, whose politically-charged work were recently featured at the headquarters of the U.S. Department of Education. L.A. Johnson detailed how a non-profit organization chose the creative activists as part of an exhibit that "gathered the work of student artists" on the subjects of "empathy, tolerance and acceptance." Johnson interviewed the three artists on their "queer" poetry, "androgynous" painting, and portraits memorializing victims of police violence.



The New York Times dubiously blamed girlish stereotypes and traditionalism in affluent districts for girls’ (relative) lack of representation among high-achievers in math in “Where Boys Outperform Girls in Math: Rich, White and Suburban Districts,” featured prominently in the news section of Sunday’s paper. As scholar and author Christine Sommers noted, “This New York Times article documents a large reading gap favoring girls and a small math gap that sometimes favors boys. Guess which gap is presented as a big problem?”



Tucker Carlson attempted to interview former DNC Press Secretary Jose Aristimuno on his Tuesday Fox News program. The effort quickly degenerated into a shouting match. Carson asked his guest to comment on the frightening situation at William Wirt Middle School in Prince George’s County, Maryland, where MS-13 members have made it "a ticking time bomb." Rather than respond substantively to Carlson's question, Aristimuno played the racism card.



“I also have a dream.” This rallying cry, handwritten on a simple white placard held up by an Asian-American mom at a protest this week against liberal New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio's plan to radically transform New York City's public schools, says it all. A new civil rights struggle in education has exploded — yet the national media and the usual celebrity voices for equality and justice are nowhere to be found.



In conversations with most college officials, many CEOs, many politicians and race hustlers, it's not long before the magical words “diversity” and “inclusiveness” drop from their lips. Racial minorities are the intended targets of this sociological largesse, but women are included, as well. This obsession with diversity and inclusion is in the process of leading the nation to decline in a number of areas. We're told how it's doing so in science, in an article by Heather Mac Donald, a senior fellow at the Manhattan Institute, titled “How Identity Politics Is Harming the Sciences.”