With the nation still in mourning from the passing of former President George H.W. Bush, NBC spent six minutes, 19 seconds during their Thursday evening broadcast on stories that amounted to bad news for President Trump and/or the Republican Party before they finally got around to mentioning the final day of the funeral services.



France’s increasingly violent “yellow vest” protests began as grassroots, working-class opposition to a fuel tax hike that was promoted by the government as climate change action. But network stories about the protests ignored the environmental motivations most of the time.



Though there have been many nice tributes recounting the life and legacy of George H.W. Bush, there’s also been the typically nasty moments one might expect from journalists in the liberal media. On Saturday night, during a two hour-long edition of Hardball, former Newsweek editor Jonathan Alter attacked Bush for going along with Ronald Reagan’s “discredited by history” tax cut policy.  



Former President George H.W. Bush was elected into office on his famous promise of “read my lips: no new taxes”. It was a promise he would come to break and many attribute to why he became a one-term president. As Sunday’s Meet the Press was nearing the end of its hour, NBC chief foreign affairs correspondent Andrea Mitchell praised the former President for breaking his promise to the public and raising taxes.



All three networks on Friday allowed just seconds to the new U.S., Mexico and Canadian trade deal lobbied for by Donald Trump. CBS This Morning deemed it a “win” for the President, but only allowed 30 seconds of total time to the deal. NBC’s Today barely did better, managing 34 seconds.  ABC’s Good Morning America offered the most, a still-not-impressive 44 seconds. 



If you’ve been tuned into TV news the past few days, you’ve probably heard “climate change could strip away 10 percent” of U.S economic growth by 2100. What you likely didn’t hear was why that was an “embarrassing” exaggeration based on the earth warming 15 degrees Fahrenheit.



Reporter Patrick Kingsley followed in the left-foot only footsteps of his New York Times colleague, Peter Goodman, in finding child “hunger” in the United Kingdom and blaming it on “gleeful” austerity by the ruling Conservatives, in Wednesday’s “Touring World’s Fifth-Richest Nation for Lessons on Poverty.” A Times’ front page from September warned, “Warning Sign in Leaner Times: Hungry Children.”



We are about to find out whether Democrats meant it when they lamented the loss of civility in Washington. Having won the majority in the House of Representatives in Tuesday's election, will they cooperate with Republicans and "reach across the aisle," or will they pander to their base, which wants President Trump's blood? Guess which scenario I'm betting on Rep. Maxine Waters (D-CA), who will likely head the Financial Services Committee, has promised to seek revenge on the banks, which she notes loaned money to people in the '90s so they could buy houses they couldn't afford. 



In describing the GOP tax cuts, House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi said that they and bonuses American workers were getting were "crumbs." They were "tax cuts for the rich." Some argued that the tax cuts would reduce revenues. Pelosi predicted, "This thing will explode the deficit." How about some tax facts?



At the nation’s top two Hispanic television networks, the annual “Day of the Dead” celebrations were more important than tens of thousands of Latinos in the U.S. getting jobs, and driving unemployment among Latinos to yet another record low.



As voters head to the polls this Election Day, one thing on many of their minds is the U.S. economy. They just haven’t seen much of it on the network news.

The liberal media know the economy is one of the top issues for voters, yet broadcast network evening shows provided scant coverage of it the week before the elections in spite of an 18-year-high for consumer confidence and a 250,000 jobs report.



With the election looming, the addition of a quarter million new jobs in October, grabbed headlines. But NBC Nightly News gave more than twice as much attention to the hot topic of celebrating Hollywood’s movie rating system.