On Friday, the College of William & Mary announced that former FBI Director James Comey, a 1982 graduate, will "will teach a three-credit course on ethical leadership" beginning this fall. Establishment press coverage of Comey's assignment, coinciding with being named "an executive professor in education," has mostly avoided the myriad reasons why having him teach such a course is a horrible lapse in judgment by W&M.


Free speech, free expression, and the simple right to go about your business without being subjected to attempts at brainwashing or the equivalent of a political inquisition have been under attack for years at colleges and universities, and more recently in the workplace. Most Americans don't appreciate the seriousness of the threats because, as Tucker Carlson explained in his opening monologue on Wednesday, the press rarely covers them — and when they do, they usually side with the oppressors.


New York Times Education reporter Erica Green picked a bizarre fight against a Trump nominee for being too concerned about anti-Semitic violence on campus -- unless one remembers how hostile the paper is to pro-Israel voices and how accommodating it is to radical pro-Islamic ones: “An Advocate for Israel, Named to a Civil Rights Post, Draws Criticism” was the headline in Friday’s Times. The text box took the anti-Israel critics to heart: “Opponents see a narrow focus as a hurdle to fairness.”


Alone Together is a new show on Freeform which chronicles depressing Millennial best friends Benji (Benji Afalo) and Esther (Esther Povitsky) living in Los Angeles. The second episode, "Road Trip," aired on January 17 and followed the pair going on a road trip with their friend Jeff (Edgar Blackmon) to celebrate Benji's birthday and we find out how they feel about Republicans in what might be the most disgusting way possible.


A frequent point I have made in past columns has been about the educational travesty happening on many college campuses. Some people have labeled my observations and concerns as trivial, unimportant and cherry-picking. While the spring semester awaits us, let's ask ourselves whether we'd like to see repeats of last year's antics.


In June, the school hired Chassity Holliman-Douglas as its first Vice President and Vice Provost for Equity and Inclusion in response to the student uprising. PBS NewsHour interviewed her in an article published on Sunday titled “‘These conversations are not comfortable’ — How colleges can address racial inequality.” Authors Corinne Legal and Ivette Feliciano wanted to know “how predominantly white institutions can work to support all students and what Evergreen is doing nearly a year after the events.”


In the January 3 premiere of the new spinoff series Grown-ish on Freeform, freshman Zoey Johnson (Yara Shahidi of ABC's Black-ish) thinks she has the fictional California University all figured out after only three days on campus. Of course, just about everything she's figured out is pretty much worthless and has some kind of political slant to it - all liberal.


The educational achievement of white youngsters is nothing to write home about, but that achieved by blacks is nothing less than disgraceful. Let's look at a recent example of an educational outcome all too common. In 2016, in 13 of Baltimore's 39 high schools, not a single student scored proficient on the state's mathematics exam. In six other high schools, only one percent tested proficient in math. In raw numbers, 3,804 Baltimore students took the state's math test, and 14 tested proficient. Citywide, only 15 percent of Baltimore students passed the state's English test.


The front page of Sunday’s Washington Post was dominated by a mockery of conservatives for feeling – accurately – that higher education in America is cultural territory fiercely held by the Left. Post husband-and-wife duo Kevin Sullivan and Mary Jordan wrote a piece with the headline “On elitists, ‘crybabies,’ and ‘junky’ degrees: A Trump backer details conservatives’ anger at American universities and their students.” But the Post barely touched on the conservative argument, other than quoting a former Arizona state senator and repeating headlines from the conservative website Campus Reform. 


A common feature of our time is the extent to which many in our nation have become preoccupied with diversity. But true diversity obsession, almost a mania, is found at our institutions of higher learning. Rather than have a knee-jerk response for or against diversity, I think we should ask just what is diversity and whether it's a good thing. How do we tell whether a college, a department or another unit within a college is diverse or not? What exemptions from diversity are permitted?


The 2017 competition for Ingrate of the Year is now closed; the disgraceful distinction belongs to LaVar Ball. Rather than thank President Donald Trump for his part in keeping his son and two other UCLA basketball players from rotting in a Chinese prison for several years, Ball, when asked by ESPN about Trump's role, shot back "Who?" — and complained that "Everybody wants to make it seem like he helped me out." Well sir, that's because he did.


It has been known at least since Saturday that the three UCLA basketball players detained in China on shoplifting charges and forced to stay in the country while the rest of the team went home were accused of stealing merchandise from three stores. Somehow, that news never got through to Vox.com's John Kirby, who shortly after noon on Thursday, claimed that the trio had only stolen "a pair of Louis Vuitton sunglasses," and seemed more interested in getting in digs at President Trump than relaying accurate facts.