Tom Blumer

Tom Blumer's picture
Former Contributing Editor


Tom Blumer has written for several national online publications  primarily on business, economics, politics and media bias. He has had his own blog, BizzyBlog.com, since 2005, and was with NewsBusters from December 2005 to July 2018. Along the way, he's had a decades-long career in accounting, finance, training and development.

Latest from Tom Blumer

Tim Goodman, chief TV critic at the Hollywood Reporter, intensely despises President Donald Trump, the TV industry's alleged failure to go after Trump(!), and especially the Roseanne reboot. In September, he claimed that television programming hadn't "caught up" with anti-Trump outrage — which even then was out of sync with the experiences of regular TV watchers. Monday, while slamming Roseanne and its viewers, he despaired that such programming will ever appear — and then decided it wouldn't matter anyway.



CBS News broke the absurdity meter in a Monday afternoon tweet and related story about today's sidewalk attacks by the driver of a van in Toronto. Despite acknowledging that the man's actions appeared to be deliberate, the networks described them as "hit-and-run."



Laura Ingraham interviewed Former Attorney General and former federal District Judge Michael Mukasey on her Friday Ingraham Angle show. Mukasey reminded viewers, contrary to assertions made by most other so-called experts, that memos and notes prepared by former FBI Director James Comey while he performed his federal duties "were classified as soon as he wrote them." He also recalled that James Comey's decision not to prosecute Hillary Clinton over her illegal use of a private server while she was Secretary of State was orchestrated by President Barack Obama, who telegraphed his expectation that she would be spared to protect his own illegal actions.



On April 13, Minnesota Congressman and DNC Deputy Chair Keith Ellison told a "progressive" audience that "Women are dying because we are losing elections," specifically alleging that this is the case in Texas and Missouri. It was yet another false claim — even if numerically true, the results would have to be tied to specific actions by Republican lawmakers in those states, and they aren't — in what has been a series of false claims made by Ellison during the past several weeks. Democratic Party operatives posing as "fact-checkers" have been predictably AWOL.



In 2010, some Obamacare opponents conducted scattered protests at politicians' homes. They backed away from the tactic when Tea Party groups and others declared that home protests should be out of bounds. Don't expect leftist protesters to receive any similar admonishments — especially if they continue to receive borderline-sympathetic coverage like protesting gun-control promoters, and even a person arrested for vandalism, received at the Washington Post on Friday.



Looking at the grief Starbucks has received for problems with two patrons at a Philadelphia store, one might ask why current Executive Chairman and former CEO Howard Schultz didn't buy some media protection by purchasing a major newspaper. Fellow Seattle-area resident and Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos did that with the Washington Post in 2013. Amazon's alleged engagement in 21st-century sweatshop practices and union-busting has gone virtually unnoticed in the establishment press since Bezos bought the Post.



Friday, the Associated Press reported that in early 2017, President Donald Trump and then-FBI Director James Comey agreed there should be a crackdown on leaks from within the administration. But the AP reporters refused to apply any form of the word "leak" to Comey's release of a memo through an intermediary to the New York Times in May 2017 — even though it did when the leak originally occurred.



The Associated Press and many of the AP's colleagues in the establishment press have had a nearly 60-year romance with Cuba's brutal communist regime. They have frequently regaled readers with the island nation's "free healthcare" and "free education," as if that makes up for the fact that the typical Cuban subsists on far less than the $2 a day the international community considers extreme poverty. Today, the AP, in a tweet and at least two headlines, pretended that it was a free election that elevated Miguel Diaz-Canel to Cuba's presidency.



CNN's Monday Situation Room tortured its audience with an out-of-thin-air assessment by Ron Brownstein that James Comey's book and his public visibility would hurt President Donald Trump's standing with white, college-educated voters — because they "look like" him. This is what passes for "analysis" on the formerly serious cable news network.



In a podcast posted on Monday, CNN's Don Lemon told National Review's Jamie Weinstein that some pro-Trump panelists on his show have admitted that, in Weinstein's words, "they don't believe what they are saying" — as if knee-jerk leftists never engage in such disingenuous behavior (sure, Don). Lemon apparently has no problem allowing people who have allegedly admitted to this behavior to continue serving as panelists. Lemon's statement is a de facto admission that he and his network are willing to broadcast fake opinions.



It turns out that Rachel Maddow's speculation, articulated twice on Friday, that President Donald Trump ordered air strikes in Syria "because of scandal" is not limited at MSBNC to one far-left host. It's a perceived, widely-shared likelihood which has frequently been tied to Wag the Dog, a movie which appeared just before the late-1990s Clinton-Lewinsky scandal broke.



The press has clearly chosen to downplay the Inspector General's damning Friday report on the conduct leading to former Deputy FBI Director Andrew McCabe's dismissal. The worst such example was a grudging Saturday item at the Associated Press.



On Friday, shortly after President Donald Trump's announcement of air strikes against Syria, MSNBC's Rachel Maddow twice put on her tinfoil hat, alleging that there is a "perception that the president may have ordered these strikes in part because of scandal," and that Trump's decision "may have ... (been) inflected by the scandals surrounding him." Maddow even contended that this alleged perception of scandal-driven decision-making will "affect the impact and the effectiveness of these military strikes."



Most of the establishment press's coverage of President Donald Trump's pardon of Scooter Libby has not mentioned Richard Armitage, the person who admitted that he first leaked allegedly covert CIA agent Valerie Plame's name to journalist Robert Novak in 2003. This pervasive failure includes items at the Associated Press, New York Times, the Washington Post, and over 80 percent of Google News stories about Libby.



A one-sided Wednesday report at CBS News tried to convince readers that University of Tennessee-Chattanooga student Brenna Spencer's "I don't take normal graduation photos" tweet picturing her with a firearm generated significant "backlash." To create a false impression, the network cited critical tweets from two users with a combined eight Twitter followers, ignoring far more significant support Spencer received, including two Second Amendment-supporting women with a combined 160,000 followers.



The Arizona Supreme Court ruled unanimously Monday that illegal immigrants protected from deportation under former President Barack Obama's Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program are not eligible for in-state tuition rates at state universities and community colleges. Press coverage is glossing over the fact that the state's educational establishment unilaterally took obviously illegal actions to institute this practice, directly defying a 2006 measure approved by 71 percent of the state's voters.



Saturday was, as Katie Yoder at NewsBusters noted Tuesday afternoon, a "sad day." That's when the Women's March sprang to the defense of Backpage.com, tweeting that its Friday seizure by the Justice Department "is an absolute crisis for sex workers." In that same tweet, the group declared that "Sex workers rights are women’s rights." Backpage and seven associated individuals were indicted Monday on charges relating to facilitating prostitution — including child prostitution conducted by human sex traffickers. Thus far, the establishment press has been almost unanimously running cover for the Women's March by ignoring its disgraceful position.



In a Friday New York Times op-ed, Neal Gabler, merely described as "writing a biography of Edward Kennedy" to feign neutrality, expressed alarm that "the despicable Kennedy" seen in Chappaquiddick "will eradicate the honorable if flawed real one." Anyone who knows the history, dramatically retold in the movie I saw, can only hope that the actually despicable Massachusetts senator accurately portrayed in the film makes the history books.



On Tuesday, David Roberts at the hopelessly left-biased Vox.com promoted a decidedly negative form of supply-side economics, namely "policies that choke off fossil fuels at their origin." He, and the authors of a paper he referenced which advocates "restrictive supply-side climate policies," act as if this is something new, when governments and sometimes violent envirozealots have long engaged in these activities.



The Boston Globe's Ty Burr reviewed Chappaquiddick Tuesday, admonishing readers that the movie "might even be accurate." Burr claims that "I'll never know" what really happened the night Ted Kennedy drove off Chappaquiddick Island's Dike Road bridge and left Mary Jo Kopechne to die in his submerged car, "and neither will you." Besides, he insists, though Ted was "flawed but human," he had "endless accomplishments in the Senate."