The media sported their real colors again as Cardinal George Pell was summoned to court in Melbourne, Australia, without knowing what the charges are or who the accusers are. But The New York Times fulminated anyway about how this will "test the credibility" of Pope Francis in dealing with sex-abuse allegations against the Catholic Church. To say that the pope's credibility is on the line is to suggest that he should act now to discipline a man who is presumed innocent. The contempt for civil liberties could not be more clear.



In Wednesday’s New York Times, Dan Bilefsky and Sewell Chan reported from London on the tragic medical and legal controversy around the infant Charlie Gard: “Baby’s Illness Grows Tragic on Global Stage.” The text box declared the science settled, and the opinion of world leaders that the baby’s life should be fought for a mere nuisance that promises to make things worse: “Support from the pope and President Trump may give parents irrational hope."



“When they go low...” well, New York Times columnist Paul Krugman goes even lower. On Friday the once-respected economist, who ia no stranger to classless rants, filed a blog post with the offensive title “The Sorrow and the Pity,” a ham-handed swipe of the incoming Trump administration as akin to the Nazi occupation of France. (The Sorrow and the Pity is a 1969 documentary about how the Vichy government of France infamously collaborated with Germany during the World War II occupation.)



Maja Czarnecka hyped in a Monday item for AFP that unnamed "experts" predict that Pope Francis "will have a hard time winning over hearts and minds" in Poland due to the legacy of Pope John Paul II. Czarnecka played up that "howls of criticism -- and even hate speech -- went up in ethnically homogenous, conservative Poland when the Catholic faithful saw Francis washing the feet of three Muslim asylum seekers." The journalist repeatedly emphasized the supposedly "arch-conservative" and "rightwing" climate among Catholics in the country.



Left-wing comedian Trevor Noah still found a way to blast Pope Francis on Monday's Daily Show as he gave mild praise to the pontiff over his recent remarks: "The Pope says the Church and all Christians should apologize to gay people...My question is, how?..it's not like Hallmark makes 'Sorry, I oppressed you for centuries' cards." Noah later dropped an obscenity: "It almost seems like the higher up the Pope goes, the more progressive he becomes. We got to send that mother-f***er into space just to see how liberal he can get!"



The Pope is at it again, this time issuing an apology to the LGBT community over the Catholic Church’s messaging over the nature of homosexuality and other LGBT related issues. During the segment discussing the Pope’s statement on CBS This Morning, co-hosts Gayle King, Norah O’Donnell, and Charlie Rose fawned and praised the Pope’s bending to the liberal tradition of raising up Christian figures who embrace the LGBT community, while attacking Christians who refuse to allow secular worldviews to bend their faith.



Media coverage of Pope Francis’s Amoris Laetitia typically noted that it reaffirmed the Catholic Church’s opposition to gay marriage. Slate’s William Saletan acknowledges the literal truth of that reporting, but suggested in an April 8 article that the document contains seeds that will sprout into Vatican acceptance of same-sex unions, though he admits that process “might take centuries.”

Saletan argued that in time, the Church will extend Amoris Laetitia’s treatment of infertile heterosexual couples to same-sex couples: “This double standard, between homosexuality and other forms of infertility, is the cracked pillar at the foundation of the church’s policy against same-sex unions. It’s how Catholic teaching on homosexuality will eventually collapse.”



What does it say about Bernie Sanders--and the Pope--that when it comes to economics, Sanders sees Pope Francis as more "radical" than he is?

Appearing on today's Morning Joe, Sanders discussed the news that he has been invited to visit the Vatican. Sanders mentioned that [other than on social issues] he is a "big, big fan of the Pope." Said Sanders: "people think Bernie Sanders is radical. Uh-uh. Read what the Pope is writing." Sanders went on to describe the Pope's views on economics: "he's talking about the idolatry of money, the worship of money, the greed that's out there . . . And he's trying to inject a sense of morality into how we do economics."



If you didn’t know the New York Times was in the tank for amnesty, Sunday’s stories would prove it. Reporter Jeremy Peters laid on a family guilt trip by strongly hinting that Sen. Marco Rubio was a hypocrite on immigration because of how his grandfather got to America: “Rubio’s Policies Might Shut the Door to People Like His Grandfather.” Turning to the New York Times Magazine, there was the 9,000-word cover story, “10 Shots Across the Border -- This Is The Wall Where A Mexican Teenagers Was Killed By A U.S. Agent Firing Through The Fence. Is the Border Patrol Out Of Control?” Gee, what do you think, New York Times? At the back of the magazine, Democratic activist Ana Marie Cox spoke to amnesty activist and Univision newscaster Jorge Ramos for the back of the magazine’s Talk page.



When The Washington Post took up publicizing a priest coming out of the closet as gay – in Chicago – it strangely put it on the front of the Metro section on Monday. You can be sure someone wanted that on the front of the whole paper.

The headline was a quote: “I’m gay and I’m a priest, period.” The subhead was “Catholic clergy grapple with whether to come out in the Pope Francis era. The Post viewpoint was clearer from the headline on B-6, the back of the Metro section: “The Catholic priesthood one of the last remaining closets.”



A year-ending survey of the most-admired men in the world finds President Obama topping the list, with second-place honors going to both Pope Francis and Donald Trump, who tied with 5 percent of the vote. Relaying news of the Gallup poll in their Cheat Sheet digest, Daily Beast editors sneered "Unholy," referring to the second-place tie, not to the controversial, unpopular Democratic president's top billing.



NBC's Today on Monday aired a sensationalistic report on the upcoming release of two books that are "exposing alleged corruption and infighting within the Catholic Church." Keir Simmons boosted a statement from one of the publishers involved, who claimed that "if the Vatican were a company they'd be in Chapter 11, and heads would be rolling from all the mistrust and financial abuses." Simmons also injected the political into his segment, underlining that "Pope Francis has introduced controversial changes opposed by some of the more conservative Church officials."