Appearing as a panel member on Tuesday's CNN Tonight, CNN presidential historian Douglas Brinkley repeated as if were fact the claim that Ronald Reagan's campaign in 1980 pressed the Iranian government to delay the release of the Americans held hostage to hurt President Jimmy Carter's reelection chances. Neither host Don Lemon nor fellow CNN presidential historian Timothy Naftali noted that a Democratic Congress failed to find evidence of such illicit activity when they investigated the October Surprise conspiracy theory in the early 1990s. Brinkley: "Ronald Reagan was taking on Jimmy Carter, and there was the October Surprise meeting keeping the hostages in Iran. William Casey, people in the Reagan administration were interfering with foreign policy then saying, 'Keep the hostages in until after the election.' So it has happened before."



Although ABC’s Designated Survivor last invoked President Ronald Reagan in defense of illegal detentions, in this week's episode, "The Mission," he is associated with victory and success. 



A current hot topic in campaign coverage is Hillary Clinton’s underperformance among millennials, an unusually large number of whom favor the second-tier candidates, Gary Johnson and Jill Stein. Brian Beutler thinks those 18-to-29-year-olds who aren’t #WithHer don’t grasp what happened the last time a significant portion of the left was lukewarm about the Democratic nominee: 2000, when lefty votes for Ralph Nader cost Al Gore the White House. Should some millennials’ non-support of Clinton lead to a Donald Trump presidency, argued Beutler, “it will be the consequence of a liberal failure to build an oral tradition around the Bush administration…[the] plutocratic fiscal policy; the 9/11 intelligence failure; the war of choice in Iraq sold with false intelligence and launched without an occupation plan; the malpractice that killed hundreds in New Orleans; the scandalousness that makes the fainting couch routine over Clinton’s emails seem Oscar-worthy; and finally to the laissez-faire regulatory regime and ensuing financial crisis that continues to shape the economic lives of young voters to this day.”



The Hulu original Difficult People, starring Julie Klausner and Billy Eichner, got political in episode 7 of the second season. The pair concoct a plan to make a historical musical like the Broadway smash “Hamilton,” name it “Carter,” and yet somehow manage to find a way to bash President Ronald Reagan. 



Former president Jimmy Carter gave a lecture to journalists about racist Republicans and Trump supporters, and New York Times religion reporter Laurie Goodstein lapped it up religiously: “Seeing Resurgence of Racism, Carter Plans Conference to Promote Unity.” The text box to Tuesday’s story paraphrased Carter’s words of wisdom: “Saying the country has ‘reawakened’ in a bitter political climate.



As CBS News veteran Lesley Stahl appeared as a guest on FNC's Media Buzz on Sunday, host Howard Kurtz might have almost gotten her to admit to liberal personal biases among her colleagues as she seemed to hedge on the issue of whether there is a liberal pro-Hillary Clinton bias. After initially denying Kurtz's suggestion that "the liberal press wants Hillary Clinton to win," claiming that President Ronald Reagan received more favorable press than President Jimmy Carter, she then seemed to back off a bit when Kurtz pressed her.



Politifact, the leftist propaganda mill disguised as a "fact-checking" web site, always has its "Pants on Fire" matches at the ready for conservatives and Republicans. This is remarkable, given that it has never given any Hillary Clinton statement or campaign assertion a "Pants on Fire" evaluation. The one example it cites falsely claims to "involve" her, but has nothing to do with anything she or anyone in her campaign said.

One of the latest outrages concerns the web site's obvious problem with accepting the realities behind the January 1981 resolution of the Iran hostage crisis. GOP presidential candidate Marco Rubio made an obviously true claim about the timing of the hostages' release after 444 days, namely that it occurred as Reagan took the oath of office on January 20 of that year. He further stated that the Iranians knew that America would "no longer (be) under the command of someone weak."



Former John McCain presidential campaign advisor Steve Schmidt pushed back against Chris Matthews on tonight's Hardball when the latter whipped out his tired Bush-caused-ISIS talking point.



Jon Meacham is no conservative. The Pulitzer-winning historian is, after all, a former editor of Time and Newsweek. Which makes his declaration about President Obama that much more damning.

Asked on today's Morning Joe for a historical analogy to Barack Obama, Meacham harkened back to Jimmy Carter: "three years into his administration, [Carter] giving a speech about this very subject, saying that there was a crisis of the American spirit . . . And a lot of people thought that there wasn't a crisis in the American spirit, there was a crisis in the American presidency. And I think that's the analogy that comes to my mind."



The obvious pull quote of the day from President Obama's contentious press conference in Antalya, Turkey is this statement: "What I’m not interested in doing is posing or pursuing some notion of American leadership or America winning or whatever other slogans they come up with ..." Obama then claimed that any ideas coming from those who believe in such a notion have "no relationship to what is actually going to work to protect the American people and to protect the people in the region."

Ed Driscoll at PJ Media believes that these words are "the president’s equivalent of Carter’s malaise speech" in the 1970s. Just in case he's right, related stories at the Associated Press and the New York Times have not mentioned Obama's statement, a clear indicator of his lack of genuine resolve, in their coverage.



Chris Matthews has voiced over a new MSNBC Hardball promo which, among other things, hails the late Ted Kennedy as a paragon of statesmanship, a "great" "leader" a "lion" who "keep[s] me going non-stop."



Wednesday is the thirty-sixth anniversary of the seizure of the United States embassy in Tehran, Iran. Moreover, it is the thirty-fifth anniversary of what D.R. Tucker calls “one of the great tragedies in American history”: the election of Ronald Reagan as president. (The two events are, of course, related.)

Tucker asserted in a Sunday post that “Reagan’s election nearly destroyed this country” and commented, “Sometimes you have to wonder if the folks who cast their ballot for Reagan…really knew what they were doing. Did they realize what sort of ideology they would inflict upon this country and world over the course of the next thirty-five years? Did they understand that they were, in effect, voting to hold back the hopes and diminish the dreams of their children and grandchildren?”