Talk about a hypocritical, mealy-mouthed non-apology apology . . . On today's Morning Joe, Joe Scarborough condemned Republicans who "support[ed] George Zimmerman before they even knew the facts of the case."  Scarborough then added: "you know, I got out early, said some things about George Zimmerman myself, I shouldn't have said, perhaps. I got overly emotional. But I'm not in office. And if I were in office I would have apologized."

Scarborough didn't reveal to viewers the "some things" he had said about Zimmerman. In fact, early on in the case, long before the facts were on the table, Scarborough branded Zimmerman a "murderer."  But Scarborough doesn't feel the need to apologize because he's not a politician.  Is that Scarborough's standard?  The host of a major national show can go on the air and cavalierly and unjustly accuse someone of murder.  But because he's not in public office, he has no need to apologize?  View the video after the jump.



In March 2012, NewsBusters reported NBC’s Today show deceptively edited George Zimmerman’s 911 call to make it appear he was a racist.

On Sunday, HBO actually had one of its primary characters on the series The Newsroom deceptively edit that call exactly the way NBC News did it (video follows with transcribed highlights and commentary):



As NewsBusters has been reporting, CNN's Don Lemon has been taking a lot of heat from black media members as a result of his opinions concerning race relations in America.

On Saturday, in a very lengthy segment on CNN Newsroom, Lemon once again addressed his detractors doing so in a fashion that folks on both sides of this debate should be extremely proud of (video follows with commentary and full transcript at end of post):



On Monday's The Last Word on MSNBC, host Lawrence O'Donnell claimed to present "proof" that FNC's Bill O'Reilly was wrong in his July 22 commentary on race to warn about the negative effects of out-of-wedlock births on the black population.

The MSNBC host also managed to take O'Reilly out of context as O'Donnell suggested that the O'Reilly's were not relevant to Trayvon Martin because he was the product of a two-parent family, the FNC host, in reality, was arguing that out-of-wedlock birth leads to high crime rates among the black population, which leads to people having elevated fear of young black men.

And, while O'Donnell claimed that O'Reilly "defended" the shooting of Trayvon Martin, O'Reilly actually asserted that "it was wrong for Zimmerman to confront Martin based on his appearance," which hardly amounts to a total defense of Zimmerman's actions.

O'Donnell teased the segment by predicting that O'Reilly would be "embarrassed." O'Donnell:



Oprah Winfrey on Monday said the killings of Trayvon Martin and Emmett Till are the "same thing."

This transpired during an interview with The Grio that aired on NBC's Today show (video follows with transcript and commentary):



"A Hoodie. A Symbol. A Museum Piece? What will become of Trayvon Martin's sweatshirt, the latest piece of trial evidence to capture the public's fascination?" That's how the editors of the Washington Post-owned free tabloid Express grabbed the eyeballs of Washington Metrorail riders this morning.

Manuel Roig-Franzia's cover story on page 12 -- "Iconic Evidence Has Unclear Fate: Supporters view Trayvon Martin's hoodie as more than a trial artifact" -- seems to be spun off from a July 31 Post Style section front-pager, "Where's the Evidence," which looked more broadly at "iconic exhibits" of evidence in high-profile trials such as the infamous glove in the O.J. Simpson murder trial or the Bushmaster rifle used by D.C. snipers John Allen Muhammad and Lee Boyd Malvo. But the closing paragraphs of Roig-Franzia's Express piece chiefly served as a vehicle for MSNBC host the Rev. Al Sharpton to promote his designs on Trayvon's hoodie, not to mention Sharpton's insistence that Martin is the Emmett Till of the millennial generation (emphasis mine):



The bad news just keeps on coming for the openly left-wing liberal MSNBC channel, which is now in fourth place behind Fox News Channel, CNN and HLN after losing 12 percent of its viewers from a year ago. CNN, meanwhile, had another strong month.

Whether it's because of lineup adjustments made by CNN or because Obama-supporting Democrats are tuning out MSNBC, the fact remains that Cable News Network saw double-digit growth in both total day and prime-time ratings in July when compared to the same month in 2012.



Fox News Channel's Bill O'Reilly began his Monday evening edition of The O'Reilly Factor by pointing out what anchors on two of his cable network rivals said about his statement that people in “the grievance industry” don't discuss complicated racial problems.

O'Reilly then went on to contrast the actions of Don Lemon -- an anchor on CNN-- who the Fox News host called “honest” and courageous for daring to state that the FNC host was not some sort of racist for daring to state that a number of young black men have destructive habits that are encouraged by entertainment media.



Those who falsely smear the other side in an attempt to make an argument tend to do so because they have run out of real ones. It would appear that the New Haven Register's argument cupboard is completely barren of everything but poisonous rhetoric.

In an opinion piece which I can hardly believe is a house editorial, the Register characterizes Ann Coulter, Fox News, the Republican Party, anyone who thinks George Zimmerman really was innocent, Ted Nugent, and Toad's Place, the venue where Nugent is playing next week, as among those who have "embraced" the "same basic message that the KKK has promoted for 148 years." Tellingly, the paper turns on many of its readers, adding "a burgeoning array of fringe 'conservative' media and members of our own community commenting on stories on the New Haven Register’s website" to the KKK-sympathetic cadre. Brace yourself for what follows after the jump, and ask yourself why any person of genuine good will -- left, right, or middle -- would willingly support a publication such as this.



As NewsBusters has been reporting, CNN’s Don Lemon has taken a lot of heat from the left for having the nerve to agree with Fox News’s Bill O’Reilly about problems in the black community.

On Fox News’s Happening Now Monday, liberal talk radio host Alan Colmes marvelously stated, “We’ll have true equality in this country when someone like Don Lemon or any other person of color can make a statement that doesn't conform with what the so-called majority believes without being called names, without being called an Uncle Tom” (video follows with transcript and commentary):



As singer and liberal activist Harry Belafonte appeared as a guest on Friday's All In show, MSNBC host Chris Hayes brought up  Civil Rights Movement-era murder victim Emmett Till and wondered if Trayvon Martin's death would have a similar "catalyzing effect" in a "civil rights struggle."

While both acknowledged that the circumstances were different, Belafonte lumped in Trayvon Martin as having been "murdered" and observed:



“It's easier to ask for forgiveness than it is to get permission” states an adage that the staff of the New Republic magazine has apparently adopted, especially when it comes to writing disparaging things about George Zimmerman, the man who was found not guilty of murdering black teenager Trayvon Martin three weeks ago.

In an essay entitled “The Law That Acquitted Zimmerman Isn't Racist But That Doesn't Mean the Outcome Wasn't,” Richard Ford -- a Stanford law professor -- claimed: “Zimmerman was an edgy basket case with a gun who had called 911 46 times in 15 months, once to report the suspicious activities of a seven-year-old black boy.”